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daijobu

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About daijobu

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    Hive Mind Worker Bee

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  1. I relate to this a bit. By the time my dd was in 10th grade I had no input into her education. She was making all her own choices and I was writing checks. So in a sense, we gradually moved toward unschooling rather than away from it.
  2. I don't think AoPS text covers loci specifically, but I do remember them in high school math. I recall a student asserted without proof that the locus of points equidistant from 2 skew lines is a hyperbolic paraboloid. Seems reasonable. And I remember we had a school evaluator visit our class on the same day when a student found an error in a locus problem in our textbook. The teacher had been using it for years and it was the first time someone noticed. I wish I could remember the problem.
  3. This. What other math curriculum allows us to deploy our well-honed pirate voices?
  4. Have you got to the part where the Native Americans are evicted from their lands? Ma has some choice words to describe them! Still I didn't mind so much because I think it's apparent this reflects the attitudes of people from a long time ago. I appreciate the honesty, and it's remarkably how attitudes have changed. Does anyone remember how in the Beverly Cleary books, Ribsy is fed horse meat? HORSE MEAT people! How weird is that, and it wasn't that long ago. OTOH, I think attempts to update or sanitize books is a disservice. I remember reading some Fudge book to the kids an
  5. I want to add as well that the AoPS textbooks include constructions not in its own chapter but as a short section at the end of several (but not all) of the relevant geometry chapters. I think doing all the constructions at one time is a bit much.
  6. I would further argue that if an older student suddenly finds they need to play catch up on some prerequisites you are setting them up to temporarily memorize material that often takes years to fully digest. Young kids to have so much free time, why not take a small fraction (just a small fraction really) for learning? It's us old folks who are short on time. I'd love to continue pursuing my foreign language studies, but don't have time. How I wish I could go back and learn it all when I was in elementary!
  7. I can say my kids were not interested in coding when they were young, but I felt it was an important skill no matter what field they were in. Our unspoken compromise was studying CS 10 minutes a day, going at their own pace. Now my older daughter will pick up a CS minor in addition to applying to med school. My younger daughter is a high school senior but is considering a CS major. So yeah, despite a lack of initial enthusiasm I would say they did really learn the material. I think they won't forget WHILE loops even as the little old crazy cat ladies they are destined to be.
  8. Did anyone else see this and picture a kitchen island full of tarts and cupcakes? (I'm hungry...) I personally think constructions are fun, but skippable. Your student may enjoy the Euclidea app for android or apple phones for a gamified version of constructions.
  9. Yes, I taught AoPS PreA just using the textbooks. I did a lot of contest math when I was a student, so it was familiar to me. The solutions are complete with every step explained, but if you aren't accustomed to more challenging problems you may need to prepare the problem sets yourself in advance to refamiliarize yourself with the topics and grow your problem solving skills.
  10. Thank you for posting this because it gets cited so much and I think it's worth a closer look. Here are some of my thoughts/questions: 1. Table 1, p. 201. 37% male students. I mean I was aware more women were enrolling in college, but I had no idea it was that low. 2. I agree that correlating GPA and ACT score with 6 year graduation rate is a pretty low bar. 93% of U Chicago undergrads graduate in 6 years, and I suspect it's similar at other top colleges (92% at UC Berkeley, e.g.). So I'm guessing if a college is having difficulty graduating its students, they may want to shif
  11. I just remembered where the SAT subject test came in handy for us, quite unexpectedly. After middle school, dd enrolled in a regular high school. She wanted to take their AP bio class, but were refusing to allow her in. Finally we submitted a high SAT bio test score from middle school and they let her in. My advice to homeschooling families had always been to take the SAT subject test in the May or June after the corresponding high school class, just in case. Take 1 year of high school biology and then take the SAT bio test. Take 1 year of precalculus and then take the Level 2 SAT
  12. To the growing list of easy AP classes, I'll add AP CS A. I had both my dd's take AP CS and AP stats. My younger dd started AP statistics in March and my older daughter started AP CS in January and both made 5's on both exams. AP CS A was dumbed down in 2009. I don't think the loss of SAT subject tests will affect high achieving, wealthier students who can show achievement with other contests, research, or other activities. It will affect students applying to less competitive schools with admissions departments that need to distinguish students who have earned their high school diplo
  13. I strenuously disagree that any AP course is college level. I think those classes are honors level high school at best, and more likely just what a regular high school level class ought to be, but rarely is. I'm melancholy about the end of SAT subject tests, mainly because I took them back when they were called SAT II's. If you paid attention in class, and got an A, you usually didn't need much (or any) additional study to clear 700-800, and showed colleges that at least your learned something, albeit not very much. While I'm no fan of the College Board, their AP courses provid
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