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Lawyer&Mom

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About Lawyer&Mom

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  1. I’ve ordered from Amazon France for delivery to the US, and in my experience it is exactly like Amazon. Here is their gift guide for women: https://www.amazon.fr/gcx/Cadeaux-pour-Femmes/ Here is a trick that works well for books or music, or anything that will be listed on both sites. Find the item you want on Amazon.com. Go into the URL and change the “.com” to “.fr” and voila! It will take you to the same item on the France site. (You can do this with all the Amazon sites. If they have the same item, just changing the domain will take you to the item on the other site.)
  2. I don’t think anyone would think she was using biology as a cover story for “undeclared.” She *teaches* herpetology classes! She’s presenting a paper at Worlds! She did a team sport, so demonstrated ability to play well with others. Plus amazing scores!?! She absolutely stands out in a crowd. You are way over thinking this.
  3. This is such a fascinating question. I think the well-advertised red flags are popular because they are clear-cut and easy to spot, not because they are universal. And like you said, the symptoms may have been there from day one, but they were more subtle. The stereotype is the introverted boy, sitting alone, spinning tops in the corner. What if you have a loud girl, always in motion, socially active, if not socially adept? Who talks constantly about princesses and has memorized entire chapters of the Blue Fairy Book verbatim? My kid passed the toddler pediatrician Autism screening without even a single red flag. Girls get diagnosed later than boys. But I also think outliers diagnosed later than the more stereotypical presentation, boys or girls.
  4. As an Autistic adult, I firmly believe an Autism diagnosis is good news. So, Congratulations! I hope this diagnosis is a tool that open doors and provides insights to help you develop her strengths, support her weaknesses and ultimately deepen your relationship with your child. I agree with the comment above, I would wait to see what treatment plans she suggests before seeking a confirmation. If she can give you good ideas and connections, you may already have what you need.
  5. I didn’t realize we are talking about a girl. I don’t expect a screener to get an 11 year old girl. It if the ASD was that clear cut, she would have been diagnosed already. Even the “gold-standard” ADOS isn’t a sure thing. I passed the grown-up ADOS and I’m definitely autistic. (Formal diagnosis and everything.) My daughter passed the toddler ADOS, and we’ll see how she does on the little-kid version with a more experienced psych. I’m so glad you are exploring this. Girls are under-diagnosed, because some of us can mask so well. Until we can’t. Knowledge will really help you with the teenage transitions. Trust your gut and keep asking questions.
  6. I probably shouldn’t have been so flip before. I haven’t met a screening test I’ve really liked, and between myself and my kids I’ve done a bunch. For me the conversation with the psych is much more important. You said she asked lots questions. Did you feel like she got a meaningful overview of your kid’s behaviors? I’ve had one where it never felt right, and a second where I felt she really got my kid, whether she decides to diagnose or not. (Waiting for results at the moment.)
  7. All of them? I’ve done several and they all tend to cover the same material. Some one may know the exact one, but I can say from experience they aren’t all that different from each other. They are all hitting the same diagnostic criteria after all.
  8. I was allowed an index card in High School chem. It really is a wonderful study tool. I didn’t end up using it much on the day, but making it was great. Most of my law school exams were open book. If the exam is requires synthesis of information, all the books in the world won’t help if you don’t already understand the material. But it is nice to be able to double check a detail or two.
  9. This really resonates with me right now. Last week was my eldest’s first week of Kindergarten and I was a wreck. We had everything ready, she was excited to go, everything went super well, I was still a wreck. I had to remind myself that transitions are just hard for Autistic me. Even good ones. Even when I’m prepared. It’s just hard. The second part too. After I crashed out of undergrad (with a degree, but it was *ugly*) my mom believed me right into grad school. Which I did really well in! I’m so grateful she had the perspective about my ability that I lacked. I hope the transition back to school goes smoothly, and the structure of school helps him regain momentum.
  10. Gas prices are similar. The prices people complain about are usually way below what we pay.
  11. I looked up “antibody screening,” which led to “Hemolytic disease of the newborn,” which I think was the most confusing Wikipedia article I’ve ever tried to read... Good luck with your testing tomorrow. I hope they can give you meaningful answers quickly. You are so right, pregnancy is not for the faint of heart!
  12. I grew up in an affluent area where “going away” to community college was very normal. (Just because you didn’t get admitted to a four year college doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have the college experience! This was not about saving tuition money. We had a fine local CC too.) My point is just that depending on the college she might not be be only one. I would research what supports are available rather than assuming nothing is available.
  13. It’s hard to see behind the trees, but this is a front gate with a sculpture of a giant rock on top. The rock sits in between the cross beams. It’s in my hometown and I’d honestly love to know the story behind it.
  14. We really don’t know any younger parents. I had mine at 33 and 35, and that’s completely average in our circle. (I had classmates in law school in the Midwest who already had kids at 23 or 24 and I was completely taken aback. Average age of first kid in the CA county I was raised? 33.5, for moms with college.). Norms vary so much by region. This is a great article: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/04/upshot/up-birth-age-gap.html
  15. Pretty sure the comments start at three in my zip code...
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