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Transcript questions - "Honors" courses, "P" grades, Weighting honors/AP/"college" or dual enrolled, etc.


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#1 yvonne

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 12:18 AM

So I thought this was something that I didn't really care about and wasn't going to spend time quibbling over. My boys have taken some great classes from some great instructors. They've been happy with them; I've been happy with them. Who cares what they're called.

 

After visiting colleges, though, and hearing about how admissions weights grades and having an admissions counselor tell me to be sure to make it clear on the transcript whether any courses were honors or dual-enrolled or AP or college level, I guess I have to care.

 

Some courses are listed by providers as being "honors" courses, even some that I wouldn't really consider honors, but, ok, I'll take it.

 

What about other courses that aren't designated as "honors" by the provider, but which definitely seem to fall into that category?  I'm thinking particularly about Lukeion's Latin 3 & 4 and Greek 1-4. I can't find anything in Lukeion's descriptions labeling those courses as "honors" courses, but those are pretty hard-core classes and the texts (Wheelock's, Athenaze, and the reading texts) are supposed to be also used in college courses.

 

For those who've BTDT, did you designate as "Honors" only those courses which the provider designated as honors?

 

Thanks!


Edited by yvonne, 17 September 2017 - 11:23 PM.

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#2 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 12:37 AM

I agree that it matters a lot for some schools.

I can't really answer your question, though since we don't really outsource that way. I did call AoPS honors even though they don't. I am trying to remember, but I think I contacted them and asked and they said it was up to me. (Very foggy memories.)

Edited by 8FillTheHeart, 04 September 2017 - 12:37 AM.

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#3 snowbeltmom

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 06:15 AM

With my boys' transcripts, I only designated classes as "honors" if the outside provider listed it as "honors".  However, I don't think I am going to handle my D;s transcript the same way.  I think I am going to list AoPS and other classes as "honors" even if the provider doesn't. 

 

I am going to have a blurb in my school profile describing what criteria was used in determining the "honors" level.

 

Imo, Lukeion classes are definitely honors level classes, and I would label them as such.


Edited by snowbeltmom, 04 September 2017 - 06:15 AM.

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#4 teachermom2834

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:25 AM

This is such a pain. I agree that I didn't think I cared back when I started but after going through admissions the first time I realized that it is important. What happened for my first two ds is that I did not designate honors but they did take a lot of de. Those de classes were weighed so heavily by our umbrella school that they ended up with good enough weighted GPAs that it really didn't matter. They also were not applying to selective schools. Their issue was having the GPA to match their ACT scores for automatic merit scholarships.

Now I have a 9th grader who will likely apply to at least a couple more selective schools and will likely have the test scores for even higher merit aid. But I do not anticipate him doing as much de because I see other classes as a better fit. So he won't have those weighted classes unless I label them honors. We belong to an umbrella school which is basically very hands off and has very few requirements yet is picky about labeling classes as honors. I know some of the outsourced classes he has done (WTMA for one) are more rigorous than what standard homeschool and public schools in the area are doing. Yet I can't call them honors unless WTMA labels it that way.

I need to decide how to proceed and if I will push the umbrella school or not. I guess I will put in a call when the back to school rush eases up for them.
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#5 Janeway

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 08:19 AM

I think most courses given by parents on this board will be honors courses. From my experience from the public schools, the regular courses are quite watered down. If you are doing anything above and beyond something like Power Basics or Math-U-See or Teaching Textbooks, or ACE or AOP (being Alpha Omega Publications) I would consider anything beyond that to be on par with public school honors. I use the public school as a measuring stick for this, as that is who my child will be compared to.


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#6 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:39 AM

This is such a pain. I agree that I didn't think I cared back when I started but after going through admissions the first time I realized that it is important. What happened for my first two ds is that I did not designate honors but they did take a lot of de. Those de classes were weighed so heavily by our umbrella school that they ended up with good enough weighted GPAs that it really didn't matter. They also were not applying to selective schools. Their issue was having the GPA to match their ACT scores for automatic merit scholarships.

Now I have a 9th grader who will likely apply to at least a couple more selective schools and will likely have the test scores for even higher merit aid. But I do not anticipate him doing as much de because I see other classes as a better fit. So he won't have those weighted classes unless I label them honors. We belong to an umbrella school which is basically very hands off and has very few requirements yet is picky about labeling classes as honors. I know some of the outsourced classes he has done (WTMA for one) are more rigorous than what standard homeschool and public schools in the area are doing. Yet I can't call them honors unless WTMA labels it that way.

I need to decide how to proceed and if I will push the umbrella school or not. I guess I will put in a call when the back to school rush eases up for them.


We just moved and the umbrella I originally signed up with balked at the classes I labeled honors on my dd's transcript, even courses taken in another state before we moved here! It infuriated me bc the person overseeing the process obviously just had a generic response as to what could be defined as honors. She told me only college level courses could be labeled honors. Really??? That is absurd. It puts my student at a distinct disadvantage if Foerster's completed in 8th grade cannot be considered honors bc it isn't a college level clas bc it lowers her converted GPA at the college level. (I don't weight my kids GPA, but I label them honors when appropriate bc schools do weight them on their end.)

Fwiw, I changed umbrellas. There is no way I am going to diminish my students' academic accomplishments bc of a policy that is incorrect. High schools across the country label courses as honors when beyond a standard high school equivalency. That is my definition and the one I institute. My kids work at a high level, significantly beyond a high school classroom, and I refuse to have them penalized by a bogus "college level" standard bc that definition means that high schools do not call any classes other than AP and up honors. Definitely not true.
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#7 snowbeltmom

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:49 AM

This is such a pain. I agree that I didn't think I cared back when I started but after going through admissions the first time I realized that it is important. What happened for my first two ds is that I did not designate honors but they did take a lot of de. Those de classes were weighed so heavily by our umbrella school that they ended up with good enough weighted GPAs that it really didn't matter. They also were not applying to selective schools. Their issue was having the GPA to match their ACT scores for automatic merit scholarships.

Now I have a 9th grader who will likely apply to at least a couple more selective schools and will likely have the test scores for even higher merit aid. But I do not anticipate him doing as much de because I see other classes as a better fit. So he won't have those weighted classes unless I label them honors. We belong to an umbrella school which is basically very hands off and has very few requirements yet is picky about labeling classes as honors. I know some of the outsourced classes he has done (WTMA for one) are more rigorous than what standard homeschool and public schools in the area are doing. Yet I can't call them honors unless WTMA labels it that way.

I need to decide how to proceed and if I will push the umbrella school or not. I guess I will put in a call when the back to school rush eases up for them.

 

It is a pain.  Have you asked WTMA to label the courses as honors? 

 

 


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#8 EKS

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 10:04 AM

How about instead of calling the course Honors Latin or whatever in the course title, you have a code section where you put an "H" and a key that says that "H=Honors level"?  Then just be sure that the course description describes an honors level course.  In fact, I'd start the description by saying something like "This honors-level course..."

 

For the courses that say "honors" in the title, you keep that way, but also put the "H" into the key.

 

This is actually what my son's public high school does.  The courses that have actual honors sections are called "honors whatever," but there are courses that offer an embedded honors model, which means that you do extra or harder work and you get an H on your transcript.  

 


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#9 mirabillis

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 10:04 AM

we are labelling classes honors if i feel the work was in that regard. regarding math (as only his pre-calc and up show 'honors' officially with the provider), i check my local HS - and do they have the lower maths with 'honors' options (like alg II, etc)? if so, i'd call my son's honors as he would have taken the honors course given the chance. for WTMA, i definitely wouldn't hesitate to call their Biology honors. for the most part, most colleges reweight based on their own standards - and many only weight officially sanctioned AP courses. but for scholarships, i understand it's an automated algorithm and that would be unfair to lose chances at those, when if in the public school, he'd be taking all honors courses. that's just my take anyway.


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#10 teachermom2834

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 10:07 AM

It is a pain. Have you asked WTMA to label the courses as honors?


I have not but if I decide to fight this fight I might ask for some support or documentation to send to the umbrella school. The umbrella school is the best legal option in my state so I can't really go out on my own. I prefer not to, at least.

My ds scored, in 8th grade, significantly above the average ACT scores for our graduating seniors in our state. Many of whom have honors courses on transcripts. It's a frustrating argument that he isn't working on an honors level.
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#11 Corraleno

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 05:04 PM

I definitely consider Lukeion classes to be honors level, which I designated by adding (H) before the course title. I also used (DE) to designate college classes, and I weighted honors with an extra .5 point, and DE with a full point.
 
I hadn't planned on labeling or weighting honors courses until I read a thread on CC in which students at schools that did not weight honors were complaining that it really hurt them in competing for scholarships. I've seen what passes for "Honors" at public schools in our previous state, and in the school district my nieces and nephews attended, and I can honestly say that all of DS's work surpassed that, although I only labeled Greek, Latin, and English as honors. (By way of comparison, my niece got As in 9th & 10th grade Honors English without ever reading a novel or writing an essay, and she said Teaching Textbooks was waaaay harder than her Honors Algebra 1 & Geometry classes, in which she also got As).  :blink:
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#12 Corraleno

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 06:06 PM

What about other courses that aren't designated as "honors" by the provider, but which definitely seem to fall into that category?  I'm thinking particularly about Lukeion's Latin 3 & 4 and Greek 1-4. I can't find anything in Lukeion's descriptions labeling those courses as "honors" courses, but those are pretty hard-core classes and the texts (Wheelock's, Athenaze, and the reading texts) are supposed to be also used in college courses.


FWIW, in a letter of recommendation that Regan wrote for DS, he said that the Greek courses were "challenging classes that are usually considered honors level." So I wouldn't hesitate to list Lukeion courses as honors, even if the website does not explicitly title them that way. The only reason to officially title courses "Honors Greek/Latin/Whatever" is to differentiate them from the non-honors Greek/Latin/Whatever classes at the same school — and there really aren't any non-honors-level courses at Lukeion.
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#13 RootAnn

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:03 PM

Some courses are listed by providers as being "honors" courses, even some that I wouldn't really consider honors, but, ok, I'll take it.

 

*cough* Like Wilson Hill "Honors Comp"  :lol:  (ETA: DD#1, who took WHA's Honors Comp last year, is taking Lukeion's Composition & Research class this semester. I think she wrote four (2-3 pg) essays in Honors Comp all year. Lukeion's writing six short (2-3 pg) and two longer (4-6) papers in one semester. WHA's will have a "H" label & Lukeion's won't. Irony!)

 

And OnlineG3's Shakespeare Comedies class, where it says in the online description that it is a "semester-long high school course at the honors level."  :laugh: I'm totally taking it.

 

So far, I have a note that says that the only courses listed as "honors" are ones that are so deemed by outside providers. I reserve the right to change my mind later.


Edited by RootAnn, 04 September 2017 - 07:09 PM.

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#14 Julie of KY

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:03 PM

I agree that deciding what is honors is a pain.

 

My first son's first choice school was a highly selective school. I emailed the admission's counselor and she told me not to bother with honors designation. She said it really just helped them differentiate if students took the most rigorous course within a school. It helped compare students within a single school. She said they would re-weight everything. I do think he potentially lost out on scholarships at other schools since I did not weight his grades and did not call anything honors or DE. Ultimately, he was accepted at his first choice school with lots of money so it didn't really matter.

 

Now with my second son, I will be weighting his grades. I think he will be looking at schools that offer scholarships based on grades and they will only weight the grades as honors if I call the classes that. I don't want him to loose out on money just because I didn't bother to call AoPS honors or some other such course.

 

I tend to think that if you have an admissions counselor looking at everything holistically, then they may be able to sort out what is honors vs not regardless of what you label it. I also think many simply plug your given numbers into a formula for scholarships and if you don't weight the grades then your student may lose out.


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#15 yvonne

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:46 PM

Yes! I agree, Corraleno, RootAnn, and Julie.... What passes for an "Honors" class is all over the board. Just like grades, an "Honors" designation is too subjective to mean anything, unless it's comparing classes within the same school.

 

But it is part of the admissions "game," so we have to work with it. It's almost another definition for insanity....  Insanity is when you try to work honestly, ethically, and seriously, as if there were actual standards by which to make your determinations, within a system that is actually completely arbitrary!


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#16 lewelma

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 02:39 AM

CMU was clear that they don't want weighted grades but will weight them based on their own formula. I'm definitely listing honours as H in a 'type' column so that they know what to do when applying their formula.
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#17 lewelma

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 02:40 AM

CMU was clear that they don't want weighted grades but will weight them based on their own formula. I'm definitely listing honours as H in a 'type' column so that they know what to do when applying their formula.

#18 Connections

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 07:43 AM

F/U question-

If you include a "type" column/designation. What would you do for classes that a student takes an AP exam but did an at home class without an approved syllabus? (One of the "w/AP exam" class descriptions? For weighting purposes is the level H or AP?

#19 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 08:04 AM

F/U question-

If you include a "type" column/designation. What would you do for classes that a student takes an AP exam but did an at home class without an approved syllabus? (One of the "w/AP exam" class descriptions? For weighting purposes is the level H or AP?


I don't include weighted grades bc the majority of schools unweigh and reweigh according to their own formulas. If I was going to weigh, I would weigh them AP level. Another way to title courses is to say "compatible with AP exam." I did that with my Dd bc she didn't take AP exams after the courses but CLEP. It is how Thinkwell titles their courses. I decided it works. ;)

#20 JumpedIntoTheDeepEndFirst

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 08:06 AM

For what its worth--

 

Lukeion Latin:

 

Lukeion 3 used to be labeled by them as "Honors" on the course description provided with final grades.  Latin 4 should be AP Latin-College Board approved. Latin 1&2 didn't carry the honors designation on any of our grade reports so I didn't list them as honors.

 

AP Courses:

 

ONLY courses that have been approved by College Board may carry the AP designation. Other courses could be listed as "honors" or "advanced" or even described as being conducted at the AP/college level with the student being required to take the AP exam at the end, or even just "XXXX with AP exam". If the course were truly conducted at the level of difficulty described by CB I would give it the same weight as an AP course. Be sure to describe the situation in your counselor letter/course description.

 

Please don't hesitate to submit syllabi to College Board, the process it not that difficult.

 

Weighting:

 

For kid #1  (and now for #2) I weighted honors and AP the same.  On transcripts I provided both weighted and unweighted GPAs and designated which courses carried a weighted grade and why.  (So far no DE courses so I haven't had deal with that for weighting purposes.)

 


Edited by JumpedIntoTheDeepEndFirst, 05 September 2017 - 08:08 AM.


#21 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:37 AM

(So far no DE courses so I haven't had deal with that for weighting purposes.)


That is when I decided not to weigh GPAs on our transcripts. What weight do you give 300 level courses? It just seemed silly to even try to compare APs and those credits.

#22 yvonne

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:40 AM

CMU was clear that they don't want weighted grades but will weight them based on their own formula. I'm definitely listing honours as H in a 'type' column so that they know what to do when applying their formula.

 

Hadn't thought of a "type" column. That's a good idea. Thanks for mentioning it!



#23 rlestina

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:35 AM

If Lukeion and AoPS aren't "Honors", then honors has no meaning...


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#24 Connections

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 10:45 AM

So is it wrong to list a Lukeion class as:

 

Latin 2 and then have a column for the level of class and designate it as H Level with a corresponding description such as, "H = Honors; H level is granted for work designated by a outside provider as an Honors course or a course completed with College level materials but without a corresponding AP or CLEP exam available." 

 

Would you consider this dishonest or is this an appropriate decision as an administrator of a homeschool? 



#25 Connections

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 02:16 PM

I am still looking for feedback but for now I have decided to refer to Lukeion Latin 1 and 2 as CP. 

 

I am leaning towards labeling Latin 3 as H. 

 

 



#26 yvonne

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 03:15 PM

What does CP mean?

 

 

I'm definitely labeling Lukeion's Latin 3 as Honors on my kids' transcripts.


Edited by yvonne, 10 September 2017 - 03:20 PM.


#27 Connections

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Posted 10 September 2017 - 04:40 PM

College Prep.
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#28 lewelma

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 02:40 PM

Can someone explain th difference between accelerated, college prep, and honours on the common app?

I'm struggling to align all their designations with my transcript. I have five courses labeled AP equivalent on my transcript with clarifications to why in my school profile. These are the NZ national exams. What category do I list them in in the common app? I don't think I should tick the AP box.

Also, I am labelling two courses as self studied university level courses,one of which will earn a tertiary diploma in music and the other is a math course. I've labelled these two as university level courses on my transcript, but they weren't dual enrollment so don't think it makes sense to call them DE on the common app. Suggestions?

Ruth in NZ

Edited by lewelma, 16 September 2017 - 02:41 PM.


#29 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 04:16 PM

Can someone explain th difference between accelerated, college prep, and honours on the common app?

I'm struggling to align all their designations with my transcript. I have five courses labeled AP equivalent on my transcript with clarifications to why in my school profile. These are the NZ national exams. What category do I list them in in the common app? I don't think I should tick the AP box.

Also, I am labelling two courses as self studied university level courses,one of which will earn a tertiary diploma in music and the other is a math course. I've labelled these two as university level courses on my transcript, but they weren't dual enrollment so don't think it makes sense to call them DE on the common app. Suggestions?

Ruth in NZ

 

Do all students in NZ take the national exams at the end of high school?  If so, I wouldn't base the designation on the exam, but on the courses themselves.  Were they typical high school courses that prep for college or were they more advanced courses typical of honors?  

 

For the independent college level courses, I would label them honors and describe what was covered and at what level.


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#30 snowbeltmom

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 04:37 PM

At my public school, the students have the option to take CP or honors level for non-AP classes.  College Prep classes have the lowest level of rigor among all of the options, which seems ironic to me considering the label. 


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#31 RootAnn

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 04:44 PM

Do all students in NZ take the national exams at the end of high school? If so, I wouldn't base the designation on the exam, but on the courses themselves. Were they typical high school courses that prep for college or were they more advanced courses typical of honors?


I'm not Ruth, but from what I remember reading, they are like AP tests in that the top 5% (for example) get Super Excellent (my made up words), then a certain % gets Good, etc. I think that's why she compared them to AP tests. . . And in Ruth's ds's case, there wasn't necessarily a class before the exams. (I can't remember if one example was the submittal of papers (like research essays?) or not.)

Edited by RootAnn, 16 September 2017 - 04:47 PM.

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#32 Corraleno

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 06:22 PM

So is it wrong to list a Lukeion class as:
 
Latin 2 and then have a column for the level of class and designate it as H Level with a corresponding description such as, "H = Honors; H level is granted for work designated by a outside provider as an Honors course or a course completed with College level materials but without a corresponding AP or CLEP exam available." 
 
Would you consider this dishonest or is this an appropriate decision as an administrator of a homeschool? 

 
In a letter of recommendation written for DS, Regan stated that Lukeion's language classes are generally considered honors level. I agree. Wheelock's is a rigorous college text, and Lukeion covers the entire text in Latin 1 & 2. By way of comparison, the nearest state university to me, which is on a quarter system, uses Wheelock's for four quarters, and our state allows 1 HS credit for a regular 1-quarter college class. Had DS taken Latin as DE at that university, he could have had high school credit for Latin 1-4 (with each of those grades weighted a full point for AP/DE) for basically the same amount of work he did in Lukeion's Latin 1 & 2. I listed all of his Greek and Latin classes as honors. (I weighted honors classes .5, and DE 1 pt.)
 
 

If Lukeion and AoPS aren't "Honors", then honors has no meaning...

 
 
:iagree:  
I've seen what passes for "honors" level classes at public schools in three different states, and Lukeion's classes surpass those by a wide margin.

Edited by Corraleno, 17 September 2017 - 11:16 AM.


#33 lewelma

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 08:03 PM

So what is the order of difficulty in the list the common app gives me: accelerated, honors, AP, DE, college prep? These things mean nothing to me.

 

On my transcript I have designated courses as: H (honors), A (AP-equivalent), and U (university level).  I assume I should align this to the common app, but I'm not sure how to do it.  

 

AP equivalent for me will be NCEA level 3 at an excellence level (courses include both exams and internal labs, research papers, music recitals etc).  

 

University level will be for his 6 math courses (2 done through the local university) and for his tertiary diploma in music performance.

 

These designations are appropriate but do not line up exactly with the words used in the common app.

 

Suggestions?

 


Edited by lewelma, 16 September 2017 - 08:04 PM.


#34 OnMyOwn

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 07:57 AM

I've gone back and forth on this as well. There are a few classes that my son has taken that clearly stand out as being above your typical high school level course. Right now, I'm leaning toward labelling those as honors since there is at least one school he is applying to that wants to see that kind of thing.

#35 omd21

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 02:21 PM

So does an Honors course earn 5.0 points, and an AP course 6 pts? What about dual enrollment?



#36 GoodGrief

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 04:14 PM

So what is the order of difficulty in the list the common app gives me: accelerated, honors, AP, DE, college prep? These things mean nothing to me.

 

On my transcript I have designated courses as: H (honors), A (AP-equivalent), and U (university level).  I assume I should align this to the common app, but I'm not sure how to do it.  

 

AP equivalent for me will be NCEA level 3 at an excellence level (courses include both exams and internal labs, research papers, music recitals etc).  

 

University level will be for his 6 math courses (2 done through the local university) and for his tertiary diploma in music performance.

 

These designations are appropriate but do not line up exactly with the words used in the common app.

 

Suggestions?

 

I would only designate AP approved courses as "AP" on the Common App. There is a trademark issue, and you don't want to give the impression of deception. I think the way you labeled courses on the transcript is fine. The "AP-equivalent" courses could be labeled as either honors, accelerated, or college-prep. I'd probably go with honors. Your university courses would be dual enrollment.

 

The Common App designations don't work perfectly for homeschool students, but you are giving them quite a bit additional documentation to flesh out his high school career.
 


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#37 JumpedIntoTheDeepEndFirst

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 05:01 PM

I would only designate AP approved courses as "AP" on the Common App. There is a trademark issue, and you don't want to give the impression of deception. I think the way you labeled courses on the transcript is fine. The "AP-equivalent" courses could be labeled as either honors, accelerated, or college-prep. I'd probably go with honors. Your university courses would be dual enrollment.

 

The Common App designations don't work perfectly for homeschool students, but you are giving them quite a bit additional documentation to flesh out his high school career.
 

 

I agree, there is an issue with calling anything not approved by College Board an AP class. Designating a course AP carries with it the implication that the course syllabus has passed their vetting process.  Furthermore, only some courses are even possible under the AP system, you could not call a course AP if it was not substantially the same as an AP course.  We've had one course on my kids' transcript that was designed to match the AP equivalent and be preparation for the AP exam but the provider had not sought College Board approval. On the transcript I weight it as AP and in the course description state that the course is designed as preparatory for the exam and "taught at the level of an AP course".  

 

FWIW, I think people worry about weighted grades too much.  Most schools look only at unweighted grades or recalculate all GPAs to their own formula.  Weighting happens differently at different schools so there is no one set formula for it. I included weighted grades on transcripts to make them look normal but I suspect that they were ignored.  



#38 mirabillis

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 05:28 PM

FWIW, I think people worry about weighted grades too much.  Most schools look only at unweighted grades or recalculate all GPAs to their own formula.  Weighting happens differently at different schools so there is no one set formula for it. I included weighted grades on transcripts to make them look normal but I suspect that they were ignored.  

 

i agree that weighting grades for application purposes is arbitrary and too much emphasis placed on it. some schools only look at grades from 10th/11th. some different. so let them re-weight. but weighting and calling things honors or ap (if ap) becomes important when it comes to some/many scholarships, from what i understand


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#39 lewelma

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 05:55 PM

Thanks guys. What about university courses that are not dual enrollment? Like his diploma through abrsm? Or his mathematics courses self studied. I've put university level on the transcript like Kathy in Richmond did, but I don't think I can put them down as dual enrollment on common app as they were done at home.

Still don't know difference between honors and accelerated.

#40 yvonne

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 07:40 PM

 What about university courses that are not dual enrollment? Like his diploma through abrsm? Or his mathematics courses self studied. I've put university level on the transcript like Kathy in Richmond did, but I don't think I can put them down as dual enrollment on common app as they were done at home.
 

 

I'm wondering about this, too. TPS has a couple of English courses (Ie, "English 6: College British Literature & Composition") for which TPS states:

 

"College Credit: This course is pre-approved for college credit (Belhaven ENG 201, 3 credits). Upon successful completion of this course, the student may apply for a college transcript from Belhaven University for this course. These transcripted credits may be transferred to other colleges..."

 

I doubt it would be "dual enrollment," because my sons won't actually be enrolled with Bellhaven.

 

I assume I would weight it the same as an AP class, since those are supposedly comparable to a first year, introductory college class.


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#41 Julie of KY

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 08:26 PM

I'm wondering about this, too. TPS has a couple of English courses (Ie, "English 6: College British Literature & Composition") for which TPS states:

 

"College Credit: This course is pre-approved for college credit (Belhaven ENG 201, 3 credits). Upon successful completion of this course, the student may apply for a college transcript from Belhaven University for this course. These transcripted credits may be transferred to other colleges..."

 

I doubt it would be "dual enrollment," because my sons won't actually be enrolled with Bellhaven.

 

I assume I would weight it the same as an AP class, since those are supposedly comparable to a first year, introductory college class.

 

I have a similar problem. My son is taking an online class that can be dual enrollment. It is exactly the same class, but we didn't pay the extra fee for dual enrollment. I suspect I'll call it "university" level and state why in my school profile.


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#42 daijobu

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 08:41 PM

When you say it's an "AP equivalent" class, does that mean he took the AP exam?  



#43 yvonne

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 09:45 PM

Another transcript question...

Is there any reason not to put a "P" (pass) on the transcript for a course like PE or for a 0.5 and two 0.25 public speaking & debate classes? 

 

I seem to remember a suggestion NOT to include any "P" (pass) grades on a transcript because a college might/would? convert it to a "0" when calculating the GPA.

 

Any BTDT experience w/ "P"s on a transcript for ungraded courses?


Edited by yvonne, 17 September 2017 - 10:57 PM.

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#44 RootAnn

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 09:57 PM

Carry on. Nothing to see here.

:driving:


Edited by RootAnn, 17 September 2017 - 10:52 PM.

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#45 lewelma

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 10:36 PM

I'm in New Zealand, so AP equivalent refers to courses that are generally of the same level.

#46 lewelma

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 10:39 PM

I gave my kid an A for PE. He did all the work required, went early to class for extra warm up, studied Cantonese terminology at home, etc. I've heard the Pass can be a problem at some schools with GPA recalculations.

#47 yvonne

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 11:14 PM

 I've heard the Pass can be a problem at some schools with GPA recalculations.

 

I don't know if it's true or just urban myth.



#48 yvonne

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 11:19 PM

When you say it's an "AP equivalent" class, does that mean he took the AP exam?  

 

Isn't an "AP class" usually said to be equivalent to an introductory level college class in the subject?

Maybe it would work better to just say that ("this class was equivalent to an introductory level college class in X") than to call something an "AP equivalent" class if an AP syllabus wasn't followed and/or an AP exam wasn't taken? 

 

Personally, I think that sounds better anyhow, but it would also solve the potential questions about what exactly made it an "AP equivalent" class.



#49 yvonne

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 11:22 PM

For those who've done an unweighted & a weighted GPA on your transcript, how did you weight "honors", "AP", and "dual enrolled"/"college class"?

 

Thanks,

yvonne


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#50 8FillTheHeart

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 11:48 PM

Isn't an "AP class" usually said to be equivalent to an introductory level college class in the subject?

Maybe it would work better to just say that ("this class was equivalent to an introductory level college class in X") than to call something an "AP equivalent" class if an AP syllabus wasn't followed and/or an AP exam wasn't taken?

Personally, I think that sounds better anyhow, but it would also solve the potential questions about what exactly made it an "AP equivalent" class.


I would not label a class as AP equivalent unless it was AP compatible. Thinkwell has courses titled that way. In essence, the courses are (or more likely were) designed to prepare students to be able to take the AP exams.

If a course is simply designed to be on an advanced level that might be equivalent to a college course, then I would simply label it honors and use the course descriptions and counselor letter to elaborate.

Fwiw, my kids have had numerous courses on their transcripts like that. The courses were advanced beyond any standard high school course yet completed at home, not DE. In my counselor letter for my Dd, for example, I described how she read Paradise Lost and Divine Comedy in 8th grade and that we spent high school exploring literature at an advanced level and delving into analysis not normally covered in high school like the cultural and psychoanalysis of fairy tales.

She had no AP courses, no weighted GPA. The course descriptions and counselor letter substantiated her transcript.

I would run the other direction from using terms like AP or DE on transcripts unless they are being used to describe exactly what schools are used to them being used to describe.

Don't feel like you have to make your transcripts match ps transcripts. Validate your courses for exactly what they are. If honors is the closest fill in the blank term on the CA, use it, but expand upon it elsewhere.
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