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Serious profanity in book "Robopocalypse" on required reading list at school


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Meh. The language doesn't bother me because it adds to the "realism" of the book. However, DH found it derivative and had some issues with the logic of the plot. For me, it would depend on how the book was to be used. I'm assuming the 14yo to whom the book is assigned is entering (a STEM magnet) high school. Some good discussion could be had on the ethics of technology and the trust we place in it, and on the validity of the author's assumptions and the logical flow of the plot.

Edited by nmoira
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Have y'all seen this yet? I have not read the book in question but surely there are other good books out there without the f-bomb all over the place. Has anyone read this book?

 

http://io9.com/5933841/the-latest-source-of-profanity-in-schools-daniel-h-wilsons-robopocalypse

 

I take exception to your word "other." How about, ". . . surely there are good books out there . . . " ;)

 

No, I haven't read it. I assume people write like that because they have nothing else to fall back on. It has no place in a high school classroom. It's irresponsible teaching.

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I take exception to your word "other." How about, ". . . surely there are good books out there . . . " ;)

 

No, I haven't read it. I assume people write like that because they have nothing else to fall back on. It has no place in a high school classroom. It's irresponsible teaching.

 

Point well taken. Consider my wrist swatted. ;)

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Nmoira - your dh's review sounds just like my sister's book reviews. They would have an interesting book club together.

I think those sound like great discussion topics. Haven't read the book, so I can't speak to its value. The reviews on Amazon are fun to read, though.

I still have a problem with the language. My oldest is right around that age and I can't imagine assigning him a book riddled with F-bombs. Even if I did, at least then as a parent it would be my choice. I'm pretty surprised that the school assigned this and thought parents would be just fine with it. Their response sounds like they were completely unprepared for any push back.

 

I remember when I was in school there was an uproar about the "d" and

h" words in Mrs.Frisby and the Rats of NIMH.

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I think if you are putting your kids in PS high school, then they will be exposed to worse things than an f-bomb.

 

Personally, I wouldn't imply that a book is bad simply due to language when I had not read it. There are some really good books that have cursing in them.

 

I do think there are better books about the same issue, like iRobot. But Robopocalypse is new, public schools seem to think that makes it more "relevant." What are you gonna do? Shrug.

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I think if you are putting your kids in PS high school, then they will be exposed to worse things than an f-bomb.

 

Personally, I wouldn't imply that a book is bad simply due to language when I had not read it. There are some really good books that have cursing in them.

 

I do think there are better books about the same issue, like iRobot. But Robopocalypse is new, public schools seem to think that makes it more "relevant." What are you gonna do? Shrug.

:iagree:

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I read The Color Purple for the first time in high school (assigned book) and that certainly had cursing in it. Would have been a shame to miss out on such a great book because of language.

 

 

I totally agree. I don't know anything about the book mentioned in the op, but in/after middle school age or so I think there are any number of amazing books which contain profanity. I would not hesitate to assign a book to my sons with swearing once they were old enough to grasp the context and reason for the use of the words.

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See, this is where I think our role as parent comes in. Will my child be exposed to language that I don't approve of? Absolutely. Will I be able to control everything my child reads/hears/sees on tv or in movies? Nope. Can I teach my child that there are words that he may hear that are not acceptable to be used by anyone in our family. Yes.

 

Now, just this weekend we were watching a movie that had way more bad language than I remembered. We watched about 10 minutes before we realized it was going to be a running issue in the movie and turned it off. I pointedly told my 7 year old that there were things he just heard that we don't say. He said "like the "F" word?" We had never, never discussed that particular phrase before but apparently he figured out that we don't say it, don't use it.

 

If the book has literary merit, then language shouldn't be the reason not to read it. If, however, it is not well written, then I would pass it up. Life is too short to read bad books!

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I have not read the book. But I'm a believer of the *least* amount of censorship needed and copious amounts of discussion between student and teacher or parent.

 

In fact, I'd be so bold as to assert that MUCH of quality high school education is about provocative fodder discussed between children and educated adults.

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I have not read the book. But I'm a believer of the *least* amount of censorship needed and copious amounts of discussion between student and teacher or parent.

 

In fact, I'd be so bold as to assert that MUCH of quality high school education is about provocative fodder discussed between children and educated adults.

 

I don't disagree, I just don't think it's the classroom teacher's decision to make. There are plenty of other book options out there that would not be as controversial. It is also unlikely that a high school teacher would be the best person to discuss such things with my student.

 

I have issues with so much of these new books being considered "relevant." I work in our small county library's children/young adult department. I have significant input on the book orders made for our very conservative county. But there's a vast difference between a book being available at a public library and being assigned in a ps classroom.

 

Fwiw, I don't find it necessary to censor much of what my dc read. One of 13yods's assigned books last year was Tom Sawyer, but I see the "objectionable" language in that book as cultural and within its historical context.

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I don't disagree, I just don't think it's the classroom teacher's decision to make. There are plenty of other book options out there that would not be as controversial. It is also unlikely that a high school teacher would be the best person to discuss such things with my student.

 

So, no Shakespeare either? Plenty of tawdry bits there. If you put your kids in a classroom, then it is partially out of your hands. I wouldn't want them reading Fifty Shades of Gray, but the f-bomb is not what I would fall on my sword over with a school. There will be plenty of fights to be had. (edited this so that it makes sense, that was my iPhone speaking)

 

Fwiw, I don't find it necessary to censor much of what my dc read. One of 13yods's assigned books last year was Tom Sawyer, but I see the "objectionable" language in that book as cultural and within its historical context.

 

You don't think there is a modern context for cursing? If you had a military book where all of the soldiers said, "dagnabit," then that wouldn't be terribly realistic from a cultural context perspective. Do all soldiers curse? No. Most of them? Yes. Watch Restrepo, it is a documentary.

Edited by Mrs Mungo
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I heard all sorts of words in ps when I was a student, but never from a teacher. I also grew up on military bases but didn't have any soldiers cussing in our homes, in stores near us, in classes when they would come into speak, etc. Of course they cuss around each other, but there is a time and place for everything. I enjoy the Marcinko books (think I learned some new words there), but I wouldn't assign them as required reading.

 

I don't believe in censorship, but neither do I believe in trying to shock the kids into paying attention. I also don't think that teachers ought to be adding to the coarsening of society. There is not enough time to read all the incredible books that are out there. Surely there was another that would spark good discussion. If not, then why not give the parents a heads up?

 

Enjoying the discussion. I appreciate seeing where others are coming from.

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So, no Shakespeare either? Now, seriously, what would cause you to ask this? I don't think anything I said could have caused someone to pick out Shakespeare.:confused:

 

Plenty of tawdry bits there. If you put your kids in a classroom, then it is partially out of your hands. I wouldn't want them reading Fifty Shades of Gray, but the f-bomb is where I would on my sword with a school. There will be plenty of fights to be had.

 

 

 

You don't think there is a modern context for cursing? I'm sorry, again, I don't understand why you are picking apart one comment and attempting to apply it across the board. I didn't realize I needed to clarify any and all instances where there might be a modern context. I don't know if you are seriously asking because you think this might be true, or because you're deliberately trying to pick apart what I'm saying and just not being nice.

 

If you had a military book where all of the soldiers said, "dagnabit," then that wouldn't be terribly realistic from a cultural context perspective. Do all soldiers curse? No. Most of them? Yes. Watch Restrepo, it is a documentary. What am I supposed to reply to this? Some of my best friends are soldiers? Some of my best friends swear? I don't know what I said in this thread that perhaps offended you and caused you to write this. Did I come across as self-righteous in my earlier post? I'm really baffled.:confused::confused:

 

You mentioned you wouldn't want Fifty Shades of Grey. Everyone has different limits, it's easy to say what may be okay or what may not, but it's more difficult to draw an exact line. I don't think the book mentioned in the OP could be the *only* choice the teacher could have made. It's wrong for the teacher to push the envelope. It's not her place. I stated that before, and I stand by it.

 

And you are right, if your kids are in a public classroom, you lose some of that control in whatever the reading assignment is--whether it has more profanity, or it's way below their level, or it's a subject matter you find controversial, or it's just a book you think is insanely stupid.

 

I'm thankful for the opportunity I have to pick and choose, whether it's personally choosing a book, giving my kids choices in books, or choosing curriculum that assigns books I never would have considered just because there are a lot of good ones out there.

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Ok, so am I the only one who wants to read it now?

 

Nope. I just ordered it from Amazon. Nothing like people who never read a book disparaging it to make me want to read something. That is how I started reading Wicked, etc. Someone on here went into a fit about it without ever having seen it.

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High school reading lists, including those which do not utilize currently popular books, encompass a long list of things which are likely to offend someone: f-bombs and other bad language, violence, premarital sex, extra-marital sex, non-consensual sex, underage sex, explicit sex - well, I suppose it's mostly sex, violence, and bad words that people object to! :D

 

I really don't get the objection that teachers aren't the ones who should be discussing this with young people. If they can't discuss topics of controversy, what on earth are the students supposed to read?

 

If my kids went to school and were required to read a book that was, imo, assigned solely for shock value or current popularity, I might object based on the unworthiness of the book as a literary object. I would not object to a book because it has bad language, sex, or violence. Actually, if it were one book nestled in an otherwise worthy list, I'd probably let it go, on the theory that it's possible the teacher is right and I am wrong. ;)

 

I think Mrs. Mungo singled out Shakespeare b/c it is chock full o' bawdy references, and plenty of bad language (most of which we moderns simply don't recognize as such). Point being, one has to toss an awful lot of worthy literature in order to avoid f-bombs and such.

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We really enjoyed the book here. Would I require it for a 14yo? Probably not because of language, but I don't recall anything else inappropriate other than some violence. The profanity, IMO, was placed in tense scenes and many times in a military context, so it bothers me less than gratuitous/pointless cursing. While some worthwhile discussions could be had--and we had them! lol--I'm not sure they're enough to make it required reading. :)

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I don't disagree, I just don't think it's the classroom teacher's decision to make. There are plenty of other book options out there that would not be as controversial. It is also unlikely that a high school teacher would be the best person to discuss such things with my student.

 

I have issues with so much of these new books being considered "relevant." I work in our small county library's children/young adult department. I have significant input on the book orders made for our very conservative county. But there's a vast difference between a book being available at a public library and being assigned in a ps classroom.

 

Fwiw, I don't find it necessary to censor much of what my dc read. One of 13yods's assigned books last year was Tom Sawyer, but I see the "objectionable" language in that book as cultural and within its historical context.

 

Actually, if you have a child in a brick and mortar school (and I do, after homeschooling many years), it IS their choice to make. That's one of the gives you give when you enroll your kids.

 

The objectionable language in the book being discussed is ALSO cultural and historical context.

Edited by Joanne
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In fact, I'd be so bold as to assert that MUCH of quality high school education is about provocative fodder discussed between children and educated adults.

 

I don't disagree, I just don't think it's the classroom teacher's decision to make.

 

But, once we put our kids in public school, it actually is the classroom teacher's decision. Teachers need a certain amount of freedom to teach works they find interesting, to use their judgement about what will intrigue and inspire their students.

 

If we don't give them that, then we might as well just sign up every kid in the country for the exact same online courses and put them all on the educational assembly line.

 

Those of us who want something different for our kids have the right to provide it, be enrolling them in the private schools of our choice or by homeschooling.

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Actually, if you have a child in a brick and mortor school (and I do, after homeschooling many years), it IS their choice to make. That's one of the gives you give when you enroll your kids.

 

 

But, once we put our kids in public school, it actually is the classroom teacher's decision.

 

Oh, for heaven's sake. Of course it is the teacher's decision to make. I assume you would know that I mean, "I don't think it should be the teacher's decision to make," or, "It's not the teacher's decision to make for my family." No kidding--you put your kid in school, and the teacher *might* make choices that you *might* not. (And if I'm not covering all of the bases here, I'm sure someone will pipe up and say so.)

 

I'm bowing out of this thread. This has gotten ridiculous, and I still don't know what I've done to make you pick my words apart.

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I think if you are putting your kids in PS high school, then they will be exposed to worse things than an f-bomb.

 

Personally, I wouldn't imply that a book is bad simply due to language when I had not read it. There are some really good books that have cursing in them.

 

I do think there are better books about the same issue, like iRobot. But Robopocalypse is new, public schools seem to think that makes it more "relevant." What are you gonna do? Shrug.

 

We previewed a really highly rated University model high school around here for my oldest. I was absolutely appalled at the book selections for kids who are 13 or 14. Whatever happened to classics? They were almost ALL new and all highly sensationalistic.

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Oh, for heaven's sake. Of course it is the teacher's decision to make. I assume you would know that I mean, "I don't think it should be the teacher's decision to make," or, "It's not the teacher's decision to make for my family." No kidding--you put your kid in school, and the teacher *might* make choices that you *might* not. (And if I'm not covering all of the bases here, I'm sure someone will pipe up and say so.)

 

I'm bowing out of this thread. This has gotten ridiculous, and I still don't know what I've done to make you pick my words apart.

 

:001_huh::confused: The thread is about a lesson plan decided by another adult in a school. You literally posted that you don't think it should be the teacher's decision. You didn't say "That is why I homeschool, so I can make curriculum choices", you said it's not the decision of the teacher.

 

I responded to your content.

 

I didn't pick your words apart; I responded to them as written.

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High school reading lists, including those which do not utilize currently popular books, encompass a long list of things which are likely to offend someone: f-bombs and other bad language, violence, premarital sex, extra-marital sex, non-consensual sex, underage sex, explicit sex - well, I suppose it's mostly sex, violence, and bad words that people object to! :D

 

I really don't get the objection that teachers aren't the ones who should be discussing this with young people. If they can't discuss topics of controversy, what on earth are the students supposed to read?

 

If my kids went to school and were required to read a book that was, imo, assigned solely for shock value or current popularity, I might object based on the unworthiness of the book as a literary object. I would not object to a book because it has bad language, sex, or violence. Actually, if it were one book nestled in an otherwise worthy list, I'd probably let it go, on the theory that it's possible the teacher is right and I am wrong. ;)

 

I think Mrs. Mungo singled out Shakespeare b/c it is chock full o' bawdy references, and plenty of bad language (most of which we moderns simply don't recognize as such). Point being, one has to toss an awful lot of worthy literature in order to avoid f-bombs and such.

 

Exactly, on all counts.

 

Oh, for heaven's sake. Of course it is the teacher's decision to make. I assume you would know that I mean, "I don't think it should be the teacher's decision to make," or, "It's not the teacher's decision to make for my family." No kidding--you put your kid in school, and the teacher *might* make choices that you *might* not. (And if I'm not covering all of the bases here, I'm sure someone will pipe up and say so.)

 

:confused: What? That is exactly what you said. Why would we think you meant something else?

 

I'm bowing out of this thread. This has gotten ridiculous, and I still don't know what I've done to make you pick my words apart.

 

Wow, that is quite a reaction. Yes, people are disagreeing with you and talking about what *you said*. Isn't that how discussion works? Nobody attacked you or called you names. It isn't mean to disagree with someone. Are we on candid camera?

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Oh, for heaven's sake. Of course it is the teacher's decision to make. I assume you would know that I mean, "I don't think it should be the teacher's decision to make," or, "It's not the teacher's decision to make for my family." No kidding--you put your kid in school, and the teacher *might* make choices that you *might* not. (And if I'm not covering all of the bases here, I'm sure someone will pipe up and say so.)

 

I'm bowing out of this thread. This has gotten ridiculous, and I still don't know what I've done to make you pick my words apart.

 

I hope you don't bow out. I get what you are saying, I think. You mean that it oughtn't be the teacher's decision to require your child to read a book with serious profanity - not that she shouldn't get to pick books. I happen to agree with that point. Yes, if you send your child to ps, you lose a lot of control. However, I don't think parents abdicate all rights. The school ought to have let the parents know about the book selection given that there is objectionable language.

 

I also feel like required reading lists are a way to get kids to read books they wouldn't otherwise experience. Picking a book that is about to be made into a movie just seems like a bit of a waste in that sense.

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I hope you don't bow out. I get what you are saying, I think. You mean that it oughtn't be the teacher's decision to require your child to read a book with serious profanity - not that she shouldn't get to pick books. I happen to agree with that point. Yes, if you send your child to ps, you lose a lot of control. However, I don't think parents abdicate all rights. The school ought to have let the parents know about the book selection given that there is objectionable language.

 

My question is, how do you then deal with the fact that many, many books that might be assigned at the high school level contain cursing and/or objectionable material? I have spent the last two years leading lit discussion groups. We have discussed Gilgamesh (s*x), The Aeneid (my dd said the graphic descriptions of the battle made her ill), The Canterbury Tales (lots of s*x-have you read The Miller's Tale?) and lots of other *classics* that are full of objectionable material. Objectionable material isn't *new*, even if the f-bomb is. Do you know why Pistol is the only one of young Hal's buddies to survive Henry IV parts one and two/Henry V? He was the queen's favorite. His very name was a joke because it sounded like p*ss. Those are just a few from the Ancients/Medieval lists from TWTM.

 

I also feel like required reading lists are a way to get kids to read books they wouldn't otherwise experience. Picking a book that is about to be made into a movie just seems like a bit of a waste in that sense.

 

I think teachers tend to pick books they are passionate about. I think they should be allowed to do so, within decent parameters. Cursing would not be enough for me to go to the mattresses over it.

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We previewed a really highly rated University model high school around here for my oldest. I was absolutely appalled at the book selections for kids who are 13 or 14. Whatever happened to classics? They were almost ALL new and all highly sensationalistic.

Let me preface with I've not read the book in question. I do have to wonder whatever happened to the classics. When I was in school (long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away) books were assigned on the basis of literary merit. Not because they were relevant and contemporary. It was the teacher who made the books relevant.

 

There are so many excellent works available for study. Why study books that aren't full of great language? I just don't get it.

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Let me preface with I've not read the book in question. I do have to wonder whatever happened to the classics. When I was in school (long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away) books were assigned on the basis of literary merit. Not because they were relevant and contemporary. It was the teacher who made the books relevant.

 

There are so many excellent works available for study. Why study books that aren't full of great language? I just don't get it.

 

It isn't that I don't disagree. My kids are studying the classics. I'm just saying, those classics contain *plenty* of objectionable language and material. Go read The Miller's Tale and come back. You should have seen the teenagers faces when they were reading aloud and realized what was happening. But, that story is part of The Great Conversation. I think it's strange that some people object so vehemently to objectionable material in *new* books versus books that have been around a thousand plus years.

 

Now, the whole argument with the woman who had a problem with the "plowing a damp furrow" bit of History of the Ancient World proves that *some* people have a problem with *any* objectionable material, but that doesn't seem to be the case in this thread.

Edited by Mrs Mungo
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Let me preface with I've not read the book in question. I do have to wonder whatever happened to the classics. When I was in school (long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away) books were assigned on the basis of literary merit. Not because they were relevant and contemporary. It was the teacher who made the books relevant.

 

There are so many excellent works available for study. Why study books that aren't full of great language? I just don't get it.

But if the book is assigned with the hope it will generate some discussion around technology (remember, this is a STEM magnet school) -- perhaps ethics, the limits or dangers of AI, etc. -- which classic work would you suggest? Frankenstein will only get you so far in this context. Astroboy works (DD and big had some great discussions about Astroboy), but it's don't think that's the type of classic you mean. :D I would be interested so see what other books are in the summer reading list will be covered in classes.

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But if the book is assigned with the hope it will generate some discussion around technology (remember, this is a STEM magnet school) -- perhaps ethics, the limits or dangers of AI, etc. -- which classic work would you suggest? Frankenstein will only get you so far in this context. Astroboy works (DD and big had some great discussions about Astroboy), but it's don't think that's the type of classic you mean. :D I would be interested so see what other books are in the summer reading list will be covered in classes.

 

Well, I think there are plenty that deal with technology and its potential dangers. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, iRobot, Minority Report, 2001: A Space Odyssey, just to name a few. But it still begs the question of how much better those books are than the one being offered. If the teacher is passionate about the one being offered, then would a replacement really be better?

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Well, I think there are plenty that deal with technology and its potential dangers. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, iRobot, Minority Report, 2001: A Space Odyssey, just to name a few. But it still begs the question of how much better those books are than the one being offered. If the teacher is passionate about the one being offered, then would a replacement really be better?
Agreed.

 

But are those "classics" or just classics in their genre?

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Agreed.

 

But are those "classics" or just classics in their genre?

 

I would say that they are classics in their genre. Susan's 11th/12th grade modern lists in TWTM only contain one proper sci-fi book, and that's Frankenstein. Classics lists are pretty skimpy where sci-fi is concerned, so you mainly have to look at books that are classics in the genre.

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I think it's strange that some people object so vehemently to objectionable material in *new* books versus books that have been around a thousand plus years.

.

 

That's a very good point. I guess my response would be that classics have withstood the test of time. They have proven that there is more to them than just the objectionable material and envelope pushing. I don't really have a problem with intense or uncomfortable subjects in books. Heck, one of my favorite stories is Hills Like White Elephants. I don't think that you need to have such vulgarity just to make something realistic. I certainly don't think that book should be assigned to kids without parental notification.

 

That said, it is interesting to consider which contemporary books will become the classics of tomorrow. My kids would lobby heavily for Harry Potter and Hunger Games. Both series certainly caused a stir in some quarters for containing objectionable material.

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But if the book is assigned with the hope it will generate some discussion around technology (remember, this is a STEM magnet school)

 

It's not a magnet school. It's one of the county's regular zoned high schools, but the students are funneled into four different tracks, one of which is STEM. I have a couple of friends who live there, and one of them has a child in the STEM Academy, and she says she wasn't assigned that particular book, so I'm not sure exactly how the summer reading list works.

 

...and I agree about Shakespeare. I'm guessing the level of non-objection to his work has to do with the comprehension level of the parents? I remember in either high school or freshman year in college having to read a bunch of poetry about prostitution (William Blake, maybe?). The Scarlet Letter is about fornication, we read that weird statue scene from Invisible Man, and the list goes on.

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I don't really think this is that difficult.

 

*Teachers should have the freedom to put a lot of different books before students. Not all students are the same. Not all families are the same. There are few 'safe' books that don't offend anyone and yet reach everyone.

 

*If your child attended a public middle school, they've heard a lot worse than the F word by the time they're 14...and most of those don't have redeeming themes or interesting ethical dilemmas.

 

*Parents should have the freedom to say 'what the heck??' and request something more appropriate for their child. At the high school level most of this stuff is papers and discussion. Substitutions are not difficult.

 

 

Why do we need to make things so difficult??

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I have not read the book. But I'm a believer of the *least* amount of censorship needed and copious amounts of discussion between student and teacher or parent.

 

In fact, I'd be so bold as to assert that MUCH of quality high school education is about provocative fodder discussed between children and educated adults.

 

:iagree:, Joann, as usual. :tongue_smilie:

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It isn't that I don't disagree. My kids are studying the classics. I'm just saying, those classics contain *plenty* of objectionable language and material. Go read The Miller's Tale and come back. You should have seen the teenagers faces when they were reading aloud and realized what was happening. But, that story is part of The Great Conversation. I think it's strange that some people object so vehemently to objectionable material in *new* books versus books that have been around a thousand plus years.

 

Now, the whole argument with the woman who had a problem with the "plowing a damp furrow" bit of History of the Ancient World proves that *some* people have a problem with *any* objectionable material, but that doesn't seem to be the case in this thread.

 

Lysistrata comes to mind, as well.

 

Feed, by M.T. Anderson, has a fair amount of profanity, but it's part of the cultural satire of the book. A point is being made. At first, the only characters you see are some spoiled, wealthy teenagers. When they get in trouble and one of the dads, a lawyer, comes to save the day, you see the generational language shift, but he still sounds like a slang-slinging fool, and it really slaps you in the face.

 

I haven't read Robopocalypse, but it looks like a very recent release... One of my complaints when I was teaching PS was that the literature selections on the curriculum were stale without being classical, so how did this thing climb into the curriculum so quickly?

 

ETA that I've admittedly had a glass and a half of red wine and spent the evening in front of HST, but I am having the darndest time *saying* Robopocalypse. I'd hate to have to do it every day.

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I have no problem with objectionable material in classic literature. What makes me upset is when the classics are abridged or edited for school use. Drives me insane, either read the classic as is or take it off the list.

 

That said, I dont think this book will ever be a classic. But I also think that I, Robot is a classic or will be considered one in the future.

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I haven't read Robopocalypse, but it looks like a very recent release... One of my complaints when I was teaching PS was that the literature selections on the curriculum were stale without being classical, so how did this thing climb into the curriculum so quickly?

 

ETA that I've admittedly had a glass and a half of red wine and spent the evening in front of HST, but I am having the darndest time *saying* Robopocalypse. I'd hate to have to do it every day.

:iagree::lol:

 

I think this thread is a marketing ploy, because I just ordered Robopocalypse.

:lol:

 

Oh and who just did her first multi-quote? Better go put that on my to do list so I can mark it off.

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I don't really think this is that difficult.

 

*Teachers should have the freedom to put a lot of different books before students. Not all students are the same. Not all families are the same. There are few 'safe' books that don't offend anyone and yet reach everyone.

 

*If your child attended a public middle school, they've heard a lot worse than the F word by the time they're 14...and most of those don't have redeeming themes or interesting ethical dilemmas.

 

*Parents should have the freedom to say 'what the heck??' and request something more appropriate for their child. At the high school level most of this stuff is papers and discussion. Substitutions are not difficult.

 

 

Why do we need to make things so difficult??

 

I like this :)

 

Okay, now, would someone please explain to me like you would a 5 year old, why there was the issue with "other" at the beginning of this thread. I really don't get it and I'd like to.:blushing:

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But I also think that I, Robot is a classic or will be considered one in the future.

 

Oh, I'm surprised you'd say that! I've always thought it was a fascinating book...did you see the poster going around on fb that said, "Science can tell you how to clone a dinosaur. Humanities can tell you why that might be a bad idea." I, Robot did such a great job of taking the idea of a simple set of ethical rules and poking a finger through every. single. loophole. It's an important message, elegantly delivered.

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I checked this book out of the library several weeks ago on a whim. It sounded interesting and like it might be a fun read. I read the first chapter or maybe not even the entire chapter and couldn't stomach it. And it had nothing to do with profanity at all. I have no idea if I encountered any. I wasn't reading it with my kid glasses on.

 

However, the writing style was so horrible, imo. It was kind of like reading sloppy e-mails or something. I don't know exactly what I'm trying to say. It was too casual and I couldn't get past that. I can't believe any school would use it due to poor writing. :confused:

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Here's my thought on the f-bomb aspect and other things which could be disturbing for some children or parents.

 

If a movie has a certain number of f-bombs it gets an R rating. In fact there are criteria on a number of levels that determine whether a movie is G or PG or PG-13, etc. It may not be a perfect system, but it's a system. I don't rely on these ratings solely in my decision making in what to watch but I *am* thankful that these ratings are there - ratings that give society as a whole an expectation of content, language, etc.

 

Most people, not all, but most people have the common sense to keep youngsters from movies that "Hollywood" has warned may not be appropriate for them. I don't mean parents here. I mean teachers and caregivers, etc. I would never show a group of under 12's a PG-13 movie if they were not MY children unless I'd cleared it with every single last parent.

 

Why do books have to be different? If the teacher were filmed reading the book out loud to the class it would get an R rating. It should not be used with the under 17 set without explicit parental permission. period.

 

If that is censorship, that is crazy. I'm taking my cues from Hollywood of all places. Not a place that screams family values or even education for that matter. If they have the decency to rate their products. C'mon. It seems like a no-brainer to me.

 

I want to know why the film industry and the publishing industry are held to different standards.

 

If there is a flaw in my logic, please somebody, show me the light. :001_smile:

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I like this :)

 

Okay, now, would someone please explain to me like you would a 5 year old, why there was the issue with "other" at the beginning of this thread. I really don't get it and I'd like to.:blushing:

 

My use of the word other showed I was assuming Robocopalypse is in fact a good book. Does that make sense? :)

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Here's my thought on the f-bomb aspect and other things which could be disturbing for some children or parents.

 

If a movie has a certain number of f-bombs it gets an R rating. In fact there are criteria on a number of levels that determine whether a movie is G or PG or PG-13, etc. It may not be a perfect system, but it's a system. I don't rely on these ratings solely in my decision making in what to watch but I *am* thankful that these ratings are there - ratings that give society as a whole an expectation of content, language, etc.

 

Most people, not all, but most people have the common sense to keep youngsters from movies that "Hollywood" has warned may not be appropriate for them. I don't mean parents here. I mean teachers and caregivers, etc. I would never show a group of under 12's a PG-13 movie if they were not MY children unless I'd cleared it with every single last parent.

 

Why do books have to be different? If the teacher were filmed reading the book out loud to the class it would get an R rating. It should not be used with the under 17 set without explicit parental permission. period.

 

If that is censorship, that is crazy. I'm taking my cues from Hollywood of all places. Not a place that screams family values or even education for that matter. If they have the decency to rate their products. C'mon. It seems like a no-brainer to me.

 

I want to know why the film industry and the publishing industry are held to different standards.

 

If there is a flaw in my logic, please somebody, show me the light. :001_smile:

 

I think your system makes perfect sense!

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