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Book a Week in 2012 - Week 49


Robin M
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Love this idea for a challenge, though I think I would have made the categories a bit different. Anyway - here's how well my 2012 books fill it in - and wouldn't Picnic at Hanging Rock count as historical mystery?

 

1. Translated Fiction - Women Without Men

 

2. Historical Mystery - Picnic at Hanging Rock

 

3. Romantic Suspense - Maybe a book from the Parasol Protectorate?

Ah, good ones for #2 & #3. I could put both of those on my list as I read those this year....

 

And, now I'm thinking I didn't know what the "new adult" category was when I originally posted! D'oh! Lol.

 

Love your categories. I think I could meet all of them this year w/ the exception of #11 -- plays/poetry.

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I love Earl Grey tea and would really love to have it sitting in that room wink.gif Dh makes these little chocolate tea cakes with Earl Grey icing sometimes. They would go nicely sitting on that table biggrin.gif

 

What I think I want to do in 2013 is revisit some old friends...

 

I love revisiting old friends! In fact, usually half of my readings for the year are friendly visits.

 

I began New Spring this week, the prequel to the Wheel of Time series. Now if only I could find time to actually read... I just keep telling myself it has been one of those years...reading, life, money, etc. This to shall pass...

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My 2012 Eclectic Reading Challenge list:

 

1. Translated Fiction - The Temple of the Golden Pavilion

 

2. Historical Mystery -North by Northanger

 

3. Romantic Suspense - hmm...The Night Circus?

 

4. Made into a Movie - Blue Like Jazz

 

5. New Adult - Q: a novel

 

6. Urban Fantasy - The Strange Affair of Spring-heeled Jack

 

7. Dystopian - The Peace War

 

8. Memoir - Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood

 

9. LGBT - Cyteen 2 (not a great example because its not the center of the story, but it is important to the actions of one set of characters)

 

10. Action Adventure - Tunnel in the Sky

 

11. Humor - Cold Comfort Farm

 

12. Published in 2012 - Insurgent

 

That was fun! I think there should be some kind of specifically non-fiction challenge on there though.

 

 

I haven't been reading about the different challenges, but I do welcome the chance to catch up on my to-read piles.

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I had trouble finding anything to read, and started then stopped more than one book. I think I'm back in the groove now.

 

Recently read: Death on Beacon Hill, P.B. Ryan - I like this series and will probably read all of the books in it eventually.

 

Currently reading: Road Rage (A Chief Inspector Wexford Mystery), Ruth Rendell and Blackbird Rising: A Novel of the American Spirit, Gary Earl Ross - Two very different books, but I'm enjoying both.

 

I'm kind of still reading Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi. It's at a point where there's a good deal of description of the steamship and how it works, which is boring me, but I want to get past it and read the rest. This will be one of those slow reads that I pick up now and then and take a while to finish.

 

The challenges being suggested sound good. I'm definitely going to do a few chunkster challenges. I haven't decided yet what other challenges (ones already mentioned or one of my own) I will add.

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Last week I read The Lifeboat by Charlotte Rogan http://www.amazon.com/The-Lifeboat-Novel-Charlotte-Rogan/dp/0316185906/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354683099&sr=8-1&keywords=the+lifeboat

 

. I started it at 11:30pm when I went to bed and just.couldn't.put.it.down. I finished it a couple hours later. Set just as WWI is beginning, young bride is shipwrecked and put into an overfull lifeboat by her husband. The lifeboat passengers soon begin to take sides and end up fighting each other while fighting for survival. Very compelling read!

 

My adult dd read it later that day -she couldn't put it down either - and we had quite the discussion over the book.

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Okay. I'm officially putting myself on a time out from Barnes and Noble and Amazon. At this rate, I won't have to buy any books until 2014. I just ordered Chocolat by Joanne Harris and the DVD, The Distant Hours by Kate Morton, Mozart's Last Aria by Matt Rees and Sorceress ( #3 in Nicholas Flamel series) by Michael Scott. And a bunch of urban fantasy e-books finishing up series I started from Barnes and Noble. Oh and The Twelve by Justin Cronin arrived today. I'm buried in books. Think I'll ask my hubby for bookshelves for christmas. :laugh:

 

 

 

Which reminds me... Are your amazon 52 books Wishlists up to date?

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My Eclectic 2012 Reading list:

 

Translated fiction : The Prisoner of Heaven - Carlos Ruiz Zafon

 

Historical mystery - The Rose Labyrinth - Titanie Hardie

 

Romantic suspense – The Witness – Nora Roberts

 

Made into a movie: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil - John Berendt

 

New Adult: Guilt by Association - Marcia Clark

 

Urban Fantasy: Spider's Bite (Elemental Assassin 1) - Jennifer Estep

 

Dystopian: One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez

 

Memoir: Bond Girl by Erin Duffy

 

LGBT: Sure one of my urban fantasy has lgbt characters just don’t remember

 

Action Adventure: Helpless Daniel Palmer

 

Humour: Changeless #2 Parosol Protectorate - Gail Carriger (well it was humorous)

 

Published in 2012: Silent Oligarch by Chris Morgan Jones

 

 

Fun exercise - Thanks Stacia

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I had mentioned doing a non fiction reading project and Faithr brought up in another thread about doing a Catholic reading challenge. Since already planned on having a C.S. Lewis mini challenge and half the books I planned on reading are faith based thought I'd see if anyone else is interested.

 

 

Faith came up with some categories that sound pretty good to me.

 

Biography of a Saint

Contemporary Theology - ie Peter Kreeft, Scott Hahn, etc.

Book written by a pope

Well known Catholic authors-Chesterton, Flannery O'Conner, Waugh, Grahame Greene, etc

One Old testament book

One New testament book

 

I currently have on my list

  • Echoing Silence: Thomas Merton on the Vocation of Writing
  • Jesus of Nazareth: Holy Week (#2 Jesus of Nazareth series) - Pope Benedict XVI
  • Life of Prayer - St Teresa
  • Mere Christianity - C.S. Lewis
  • Mother Teresa, Come Be My Light
  • Seeds of Contemplation - Thomas Merton
  • The Apostles - Pope Benedict XVI
  • Three Philosophies of Life - Peter Kreeft

 

 

Even if you aren't Catholic, Pope Benedict is a great theologian (imho) whose insights and explanations give the Bible and the life of Jesus whole new meaning. His explanation into the symbolical meanings and history of and in the Bible are so clear and mind-expanding. It made me see the bible in a whole new light.

 

If you have ideas for any other categories, let me know. I don't want to limit it to catholic. It will be all encompassing so let's just called it a Faith Reading Challenge and if any of the categories inspire you, that's a plus.

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Well, crud. I had a nice response and hit the wrong key on my keyboard and poof. Sorry for the confusion, Karin. The list of suggested authors and books were just that, suggestions. There are no limits to what you can post about. I am looking forward to hearing about your mom and dad's list of books. This is your challenge as much as anyone elses, it's very individualistic while being a group thing. I just moderate, guide, suggest, steer the ship, and help get you there. I was just trying to narrow down the list of suggestions because I know there are some people who if given too many choices, can't make a choice at all. I was hoping to find one book in there that we could use as a readalong, that's why I was asking for top ten choices. Once everyone has posted their ideas about the canadian authors, I'll add it to the 52 books blog as a page so it can be accessed at any time and everyone doesn't have to search the threads to find it. There is no time limit so don't rush your mom. We aren't starting out with a canadian readalong. So, no worries. Also your reads can came from anywhere and overlap any challenge. Hope this sets your mind at ease. This is supposed to be fun, not stressful. And don't mind me, just keep doing what you are doing.

 

Thanks. It was just a simple wording thing and I think I wasn't having a great day that day so probably misinterpreted it--i thought you said that that was THE Canadian list (caps mine). This sounds a lot more like you and this thread :).

Gulp! I'd love to do the Canadian challenge - after April 1st. :tongue_smilie:

Perhaps we can have a list of challenges to do when we want to or something like that. I plan to do at least several of the challenges as that will be more fun for me than one all year (okay, technically a book a week is a challenge already;))

I. A pair of sweatpants. Skinny fit. Two sizes two small. I'm a short curvy gal with 20 pounds to lose. Those sweatpants were skin tight. And I want to kick whoever came up with the idea of "skinny fit". And if I was going to wear sweatpants I want them to be loose fitting and comfortable. Sister wants to know why she hasn't seen me in the sweatpants yet. My BFF is threatening to buy me more sweatpants for Christmas because she finds the whole situation hilarious.
Skinny sweatpants? What the heck are those? That's just wrong. Sweat are supposed to be baggy and comfy with plenty of room for bloated PMS bellies.

 

:ack2: Skinny fit only works for a small group of individuals, most of whom have never had children primarily because they are too young, and not for sweat pants ever. They are supposed to be loose and comfortable (aka baggy).

 

At least my family is happy to give and receive books if that's what people want. My parents don't really need anything, so I try to find them books they haven't read yet (sometimes a challenge.). I told my mother what I was getting my dad months ago so no one else gets it, as he's a Ken Follett fan. I actually asked her if she'd read two books and told her I'd give her one of them (at least one is something I read after reading about here, and it's what she's getting.) I don't always ask, but it's so hard to be sure that she hasn't already read a well known, good literary novel. (she reads other things, of course, but a lot of literary fiction.) I give books to my nieces and nephews, but they are vetted by my dc first (mainly because reading them from the library is how we find them.)

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Mytwoblessings,

 

I've had an imposing Church history book on my list for a while - can we add that category?

 

ETA: And I vote we encourage non-Catholics to join in with their equivalent categories. More = merrier.

 

I was kind of pondering the irony of joining a mini-challenge about Catholic books when I have a pile of LDS books to read too. Maybe I'll just get a double dose of theological reading this year--that would probably be beneficial!

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I'm kind of still reading Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi. It's at a point where there's a good deal of description of the steamship and how it works, which is boring me, but I want to get past it and read the rest.

There's an interesting article in a recent Smithsonian magazine about the real Tom Sawyer (who Mark Twain knew).

Tom-Sawyer1-226x300.jpg

Thanks Jenn! That was an immediate girlfriend forward!

 

RE Patrick Stewart and chicken video--can't find original post

 

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: What made this even funnier for me was that yesterday I saw this Tim_O_Brien__The_Chicken_King.jpg

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I was kind of pondering the irony of joining a mini-challenge about Catholic books when I have a pile of LDS books to read too. Maybe I'll just get a double dose of theological reading this year--that would probably be beneficial!

Tackle the LDS books - I want to see what makes the Mormon guilt list of Books One Should Have Read But Haven't.

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ETA: And I vote we encourage non-Catholics to join in with their equivalent categories. More = merrier.

 

 

I agree, it should be all encompassing, inclusive of all faiths. Thought could call it Faith based reading challenge or project. Maybe Religious and Theological Reading Project would be better. I don't know. What sounds good to you guys.

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Ooh, there could be an awesome atheist/ skeptic/ freethinker version of the reading challenge, too! Lucretius, Voltaire, Diderot, Shaw....

 

ETA: One could extend the category to "humanist" and bring in Jefferson.

 

 

Another brain explosion as it is split in too many directions. :willy_nilly: I think some of those fall in the Well Educated Mind category. I had a thought and it may be a stupid one but do any of you remember the 10/10/10 or 11/11/11/ challenge. Since we are going on our 5th year (woohoo!) doing the challenge, how about 5/5/5 and you get to create your own category and fill it with the books you want to read. Just a thought. And now I'm going to try an avoid making this more complicated. Read what you want, see what fits the mini challenges that will be available all year and most of all have fun. I'm off to put my brain back together again. :svengo:

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Hey, the book I'm currently reading (Let's Pretend This Never Happened) won the Goodreads Best Books of 2012 award in the Humor category. I'm more than halfway through the book & have been laughing so manically at some of the sections that my family is starting to give me wide berth & wonder what's wrong with me. :leaving: :smilielol5: (Of course, running on sleep-deprivation & extreme stress while reading a wickedly funny book just makes it extra hilarious.)

 

Wanted to mention it in case anyone needs some laughs....

 

P.S. (There is a lot of swearing in it, so keep that in mind if that would bother you.)

 

ETA: The author has a blog that I thought I had never read. But when I checked it out, I remember reading it once because someone on the board had posted a link to her giant metal chicken post. If you like the blog post, you will like her book.

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112. Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth (& Ernestine)~memoir, humor, large family, '20s. Read aloud. Boys enjoyed this. Even my picky 9 year old. They missed Dad when he was gone.

 

111. Drinking Coffee, Elsewhere by JJ Packer~literary fiction, short stories, African-American experience. Wow, this was good. Not quite as even as Lahiri's amazing book of short stories, but packed with so much punch. Lots to think about. I got pulled into the world of each character. I'll be reading more Packer in the future. The only thing I questioned was her use of so many religious characters without seeming to really understand religious people. That was acceptable for a few stories (after all, there are all kinds of experience) but when you get to story 3 or 4 (out of perhaps 10), it seems to be less exploring the experience of many kinds of people and more working out whatever difficulties she had in the past. Remarkable work though--excellent writer. *

 

110. Double Star by Robert Heinlein~classic science fiction, politics, doubles. I've been scrounging around for easier material to keep my attention until my class is over. Actor is shanghaied and convinced to play the role of a lifetime and larger-than-life politician working toward an inclusive, libertarian expansion to the stars. Enough humor. Enough Heinlein politics. Gender mysogyny, you know, your usual Heinlein. It was okay. Was funnier at the beginning before people made decisions which made no sense. Eh. Not one of his better ones in my opinion, but dh was reading it with me and he finished first.

 

*Top 10

**Best of the Year

109. Cabin: Two Brothers, a Dream, and 5 Acres in Maine by Lou Ureneck~non-fiction, memoir, building, life.

108. The House at Riverton by Kate Morton~fiction, Edwardian era, WWI, servants, forbidden love.

107. The Woodcutter by Kate Danley~fantasy, fairy tales, retelling.

106. The Night Circus by Erin Morganstern~magic, circus, competition, romance.*

105.First We Have Coffee by Margaret Jensen~Norwegian immigrants, spiritual life, memoir, coming of age.

104. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart~children's fiction, spies.

103. The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry by Kathleen Flinn~memoir, Paris, cooking school.

102. The Zookeeper's Wife by Diane Ackerman~WWII, memoir, Warsaw.

98. Baby Catcher by Peggy Vincent~memoir, midwives, California, birth stories.

96. The Gypsies by Jan Yoors~'30s, Gypsy/Rom culture.

94. Delta Wedding by Eudora Welty~fiction, deep South, family. *

91. True Grit by Charles Portis~western, coming of age, humor/irony. **

85. Doc by Mary Doria Russell~historical fiction, American plains, Doc Holliday.

82. Landscaping with Native Plants of Minnesota by Lynn Steiner~gardening, native plants.

81. The Housekeeper and the Professor by Yoko Ogawa~mathematics, friendship, family, baseball.

79. Half Broke Horses by Jeannette ~memoir, biography, southwest

78. The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack by Mark Hodder~science fiction, alternate history, Richard Burton, steampunk.

68. The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall~children's fiction, sisters, adventure. *

61. The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum~non-fiction, forensic science, chemistry, New York, Prohibition. *

59. The Green Mile by Stephen King~supernatural, prison, 1930s. *

51. North by Northanger by Carrie Bebis~Jane Austen, mystery

47. The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi~memoir, Italy, criminal case, serial killer. *

41. Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris~fiction, France, WWII, food. *

28. Divergent by Veronica Roth~youth fiction, dystopian.

23. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks~non-fiction, memoir, history of chemistry.

18. A Thread of Grace by Mary Doria Russell~fiction, WWII **

11. Case Histories by Kate Atkinson~mystery

7. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman~non-fiction/medical *

2. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton~Fiction

1. The Children's Book by A.S. Byatt~Fiction

 

 

Working on:

Blood Meridian (McCarthy) ~I will finish this, I will. Sometime when I can access a Spanish translator on the computer.

The Little Book (Edwards)~classic rock star time travels to turn of the century Vienna, meets his mentor's mentor

Cutting for Stone

Too Many Crooks Spoil the Broth (Myers)~Pennsylvania Dutch mystery

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I agree, it should be all encompassing, inclusive of all faiths. Thought could call it Faith based reading challenge or project. Maybe Religious and Theological Reading Project would be better. I don't know. What sounds good to you guys.

 

Inspirational Reading???

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Another brain explosion as it is split in too many directions. :willy_nilly: I think some of those fall in the Well Educated Mind category. I had a thought and it may be a stupid one but do any of you remember the 10/10/10 or 11/11/11/ challenge. Since we are going on our 5th year (woohoo!) doing the challenge, how about 5/5/5 and you get to create your own category and fill it with the books you want to read. Just a thought. And now I'm going to try an avoid making this more complicated. Read what you want, see what fits the mini challenges that will be available all year and most of all have fun. I'm off to put my brain back together again. :svengo:

 

 

I'm loving all these challenge ideas. In fact looking back through the 10/10/10 Challenge gave me great ideas for catagories in my 5/5/5 challenge. A lot of the ideas have been posted here as challenges so I'm hoping I won't make this too complicated on myself!

 

5/5/5 Challenge

 

1. Visit Old Friends - reread a few old favorites

2. British mysteries - my favorite genre so this might be a bit of cheating

3. Read alongs with DD

4. Humor

5. Oldest books on my Goodreads to read shelf (aka Dusty books)

 

Also I want to do the:

 

Catholic (religious) Challenge

Canadian author Challenge

Chunkster Challenge

Book vs. Movie Challenge

My own personal - don't read so many books that they all blend together challenge

 

Seems like I might be forgetting a few challenges ... Maybe we can have a master list somewhere?

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Thanks, VC. When Robin mentioned a religious reading challenge, I was over here scratching my virtual head thinking, "I wonder it they'd count Christopher Hitchens?" ;) I saw the winners finally posted yesterday and could not believe that J.K. Rowling's book won for Best Fiction. I have not read one single, solitary glowing review of that book ever, anywhere. Even the folks that liked it on the whole had reservations / criticisms about parts. Her publishing folks must have stuffed the ballot box :angry: BTW, I finished #80 for the year, The Cricket In Times Square, which I was doing as a read-along with my 12yo. What a lovely story!! I had never read it before. eta: I have that chicken issue of the Smithsonian. Not kidding.

 

Ditto on the surprise with JK Rowlings book. I don't know who was voting for that. Must have been the same people voting for those 50 Shades books.

 

Stacia, added this to my wish list :). I need to take the time to look at the Good Reads Best Books categories.

 

I had fun looking through the list of pictures book. Looks like it's been a great year for picture books from that list. I highly recommend:

 

12159951.jpg

 

DH read that aloud to DD and I and we all LOVED it. There's no plot but it's so beautiful and interesting. I think someone of any age would like it. I told DD to put it in the library bag to take back and she didn't want to because she wanted to read it again. For the sixth time. I told her not to worry because our own would be showing up shortly from Amazon.

 

Hey, the book I'm currently reading (Let's Pretend This Never Happened) won the Goodreads Best Books of 2012 award in the Humor category. I'm more than halfway through the book & have been laughing so manically at some of the sections that my family is starting to give me wide berth & wonder what's wrong with me. :leaving: :smilielol5: (Of course, running on sleep-deprivation & extreme stress while reading a wickedly funny book just makes it extra hilarious.) Wanted to mention it in case anyone needs some laughs....

 

P.S. (There is a lot of swearing in it, so keep that in mind if that would bother you.) ETA: The author has a blog that I thought I had never read. But when I checked it out, I remember reading it once because someone on the board had posted a link to her giant metal chicken post. If you like the blog post, you will like her book.

 

Adding to my to-read list based on this recommendation. I need funny.

 

PS Cussing doesn't bother me. My dad and DH could be professional cussers if there was any money it. As a kid I remember my dad taking two cuss words together and putting them together to make an all new cuss word.

 

112. Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth (& Ernestine)~memoir, humor, large family, '20s. Read aloud. Boys enjoyed this. Even my picky 9 year old. They missed Dad when he was gone.

 

We did this as an audiobook on a car trip a few years ago and really enjoyed it also. It got us from Missouri to Indiana without a peek from the kids in the backseat. Now that's a good book!

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#136 The Song of Achilles (Madeline Miller; fiction)

#135 The Hobbit (J.R.R. Tolkien; fiction)

#134 The Misanthrope (Molière; play)

#133 Counterfeit Kids: Why They Can't Think and How to Save Them (Ron Baird; non-fiction)

 

 

Complete list of books read in 2012 can be found

here.

 

 

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I wouldn't mind doing a 5/5/5 challenge. I've never done a reading challenge. I always just read. Constantly. This will be interesting.

 

My challenge:

 

5 books on my TBR list (They don't have to be the oldest, but they do have to at least be "dusty".)

5 biography or autobiography

5 other non-fiction

5 books I've been meaning to re-read

5 short stories or essays

 

I will also do the chunkster challenge.

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My challenge:

 

5 books on my TBR list (They don't have to be the oldest, but they do have to at least be "dusty".)

5 biography or autobiography

5 other non-fiction

5 books I've been meaning to re-read

5 short stories or essays

 

I will also do the chunkster challenge.

 

 

 

I'm still fleshing this out. I might change my 5/5/5 challenge. I thought about just adding a category and just giving myself a 6/6/6 challenge, but most people find that number combination too creepy. :D

 

I want to go through the list in The Well Educated Mind. There are a number of books on there that I've already read, and others I have no desire to read (autobiography of Chuck Colson - no thanks). I will either add a WEM challenge or roll my biography/autobiography and other non-fiction into one category, then add 5 from TWEM.

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Hey, the book I'm currently reading (Let's Pretend This Never Happened) won the Goodreads Best Books of 2012 award in the Humor category. I'm more than halfway through the book & have been laughing so manically at some of the sections that my family is starting to give me wide berth & wonder what's wrong with me. :leaving: :smilielol5: (Of course, running on sleep-deprivation & extreme stress while reading a wickedly funny book just makes it extra hilarious.)

 

 

I have this book on my TBR list. Along with Jen Lancaster's latest.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks, VC. When Robin mentioned a religious reading challenge, I was over here scratching my virtual head thinking, "I wonder it they'd count Christopher Hitchens?" ;)

 

 

Sam Harris and Dan Barker

 

 

 

Or Dawkins. ;) I figured there were plenty of other challenges that I'd just skip that one.

 

I actually have books talking about religion and faith I want to read so I'd use those along with atheist books. :)

 

 

Inspirational Reading???

 

Love that. Covers all the faiths and non-faith.

 

 

 

Well, my challenge for this year was to read an equal number of fiction as non-fiction because I always read a lot of non-fiction. I wanted to push myself to expand into the world of fiction a bit more. I failed. So far I've read 36 non-fiction and 21 fiction. I fell behind somewhere. :lol:

 

I am about to finish a fiction book soon though.

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Well, my challenge for this year was to read an equal number of fiction as non-fiction because I always read a lot of non-fiction. I wanted to push myself to expand into the world of fiction a bit more. I failed. So far I've read 36 non-fiction and 21 fiction. I fell behind somewhere.

 

I am about to finish a fiction book soon though.

 

 

I'm just the opposite and have to challenge myself to read non-fiction. Your reading is much more balanced than mine though. Of the 55 books I read so far this year, only 9 were non-fiction. I am reading a non-fiction one now. If I manage to get through it, at least I'll hit double digits before the year ends. :lol:

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Is there a link to all the challenges?

 

I will definitely try to work on my to-read shelves, especially History. Man, I am a sucker for an interesting looking history, but it takes too much concentration to read them on a regular basis. I'm no longer allowed buy history or memoirs until I either move into a bigger house and get more book shelves or I read some of these and re-home them.

 

I'd like to see more non-fiction challenges too. Reading something from each of the Dewey Decimal divisions? Cookbook challenge?

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I have this book on my TBR list. Along with Jen Lancaster's latest.

 

Be sure to post what you think of the Jen Lancaster one.

 

I had also tried the Caitlin Moran one, but made it only a few pages. It didn't strike my fancy & I took it back to the library. I probably didn't give it enough of a chance (because I read only a few pages), but I just didn't want to read it.

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I'd like to see more non-fiction challenges too. Reading something from each of the Dewey Decimal divisions?

 

That could be an interesting one. I've already found some neat books that way in the past. My dd often heads for the animal section in the non-fiction area & I've ended up scanning shelves & rows nearby & selected different books that way.

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Is there a link to all the challenges? I will definitely try to work on my to-read shelves, especially History. Man, I am a sucker for an interesting looking history, but it takes too much concentration to read them on a regular basis. I'm no longer allowed buy history or memoirs until I either move into a bigger house and get more book shelves or I read some of these and re-home them. I'd like to see more non-fiction challenges too. Reading something from each of the Dewey Decimal divisions? Cookbook challenge?

 

I would totally join you in a cookbook challenge! I didn't count them in my read list but I bet I've read ten to fifteen cookbooks this year.

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