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What was the name of that European online school offering free AP classes?


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Harari.  I chatted with them.  They were hm, very encouraging and supporting but no matter what they do, my son cannot handle multiple AP's in one year and do well.  His processing speed is simply too low.  When I suggested for him to be able to succeed in that program they would have to lower their standards, the conversation turned somewhat chilly and i was told they would never do that.  Good for them, I would not want lower standards but then they should not keep insisting that they can make it work for any student.  The courses look great and I definitely entertain to sign him up for a class or so.

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Harari. I chatted with them. They were hm, very encouraging and supporting but no matter what they do, my son cannot handle multiple AP's in one year and do well. His processing speed is simply too low. When I suggested for him to be able to succeed in that program they would have to lower their standards, the conversation turned somewhat chilly and i was told they would never do that. Good for them, I would not want lower standards but then they should not keep insisting that they can make it work for any student. The courses look great and I definitely entertain to sign him up for a class or so.

Thanks!!

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I just looked them up.  They seem a little weird (maybe I just feel it's

too good to be true?)  They said they get their funding from grants, and

that the teachers don't get paid at all (!)  (I don't know how I feel about that).  

At Khan I know the people who work there get paid.  There

are typos in several places on the website, which always makes me

a little worried from educational institutions.

 

 

 

 

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My twins are enrolled for summer to see how it goes. So far we are all impressed, but they have only had a few classes. I am a single mom on a very limited income, so for us it was too good to pass up. At the same time I am somewhat skeptical because it is free, so I am making alternative plans for fall in case it is not as good as it seems. 

 

 

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We're trying it for Spanish this summer. Unless there's something I'm not catching, I don't see the teachers not being paid as any more of an issue than I do for the people who volunteer to teach through somewhere like the Virtual Homeschool Group online or in our local co-op, as I presume they are volunteering of their own free will, not being press-ganged  :001_smile: . I'm grateful they're willing to do so.

 

Jilly, which classes have your kids taken? My daughter has done the study skills sessions, but that's it. Her language class doesn't start for another couple of weeks.

 

 

 

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They have done the three study skills classes. Maybe they were in the same class? They enjoyed them especially finding out what their learning style is.

The rest they start on the 16th. They are looking forward to their foreign language class because the classes are so small. They are hoping they will learn more that way.

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Are there details for the classes? Topics covered, beginning/ending dates, format, grading information? I poked around on the website but couldn't find more class information than the listing with short blurbs

 

I chatted a bit with them (in that pop-up text box) the other day.  I don't have all the information, but for timing they have three semesters I think  year round - 14 weeks on, then 24 (or 25?) days off, times three.  The listing for the "summer" courses I think when the summer term starts - in June, don't remember what day.

 

I think the AP courses cover all three terms?  The "global studies" electives I think are just one term each, and you're supposed to take 10 per year for the last two years (sounds like it's pretty much a 2-year program).

 

The format is live classes, heavily discussion-based - at least that's what they told me.

 

They are unabashedly humanities-focused.  They said their science classes are usually one-on-one tutoring, as there's not much demand.  They do require one science or math AP, but they said almost everyone did the Enviornmental Science AP, as it's the 'easiest'.

 

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They have done the three study skills classes. Maybe they were in the same class? They enjoyed them especially finding out what their learning style is.

 

The rest they start on the 16th. They are looking forward to their foreign language class because the classes are so small. They are hoping they will learn more that way.

 

Please tell us how they go...I have to admit that I wouldn't risk such courses as there is only one AP per year. So if you fail, it's not easy to redo....But if you start the process at a younger age, then you don't have as much to lose....

 

Joan

 

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I chatted a bit with them (in that pop-up text box) the other day.  I don't have all the information, but for timing they have three semesters I think  year round - 14 weeks on, then 24 (or 25?) days off, times three.  The listing for the "summer" courses I think when the summer term starts - in June, don't remember what day.

 

I think the AP courses cover all three terms?  The "global studies" electives I think are just one term each, and you're supposed to take 10 per year for the last two years (sounds like it's pretty much a 2-year program).

 

The format is live classes, heavily discussion-based - at least that's what they told me.

 

They are unabashedly humanities-focused.  They said their science classes are usually one-on-one tutoring, as there's not much demand.  They do require one science or math AP, but they said almost everyone did the Enviornmental Science AP, as it's the 'easiest'.

 

 

They will send you a syllabus for a class if you request it, but I agree that it would be easier if the information was more readily available upfront. The semesters seem to run June 16-Sept 22, Oct-Jan, Feb-May. The off-set schedule may be a challenge to combine with other classes that run on a more traditional schedule. When I asked whether most of their students are juniors and seniors, they said that actually more are 9th/10th grade, which surprised me. 

 

 

 

My daughter will be taking Spanish 2, but it will be with a tutor as that is not a popular language with them. I was potentially interested in some of the other classes, but that would have meant bypassing some summer opportunities like interning with a theater camp for younger kids. When I asked, they said it was not uncommon for homeschoolers using the program to not take all three semesters. My daughter will also just be entering 9th grade, so I was hesitant to commit to multiple classes that would overlap with other options we will have in the fall (and I have to say I'm almost equally feeling my way with a couple of those, as our local school system is offering a new option for online classes with teacher support). I'm still not completely clear on how the 2 vs 3 semester thing works for the AP classes, but we're not quite ready to jump into those at this point. 

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I'm confused. If it's common for homeschoolers to take two terms instead of three, how does that work? Do they miss one-third of the content?

 

Upthread the classes are described as heavily discussion-based. Are there writing assignments? Are they graded with feedback?

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When I talked to them (and it was only one person, so I'm not sure I've got the 'right' answer), she said that they didn't really have people signing up for a course here or there (she claimed never to have heard about such a thing).  That people enroll in the whole course.    I mentioned I knew someone who had signed up for just one course (the poster here who's doing Spanish), and she said "oh, we sometimes do that for language classes."  So they're looking to see if there's someone to tutor my dd in AP Spanish - haven't heard back yet.

 

I also asked what classes would transfer for the full program, and which wouldn't, if my dd decided to punt school senior year and give this a whirl.  They said she wouldn't be able to get the "Global Studies" diploma in just one year, but she could get a "General Studies" diploma.  They also said she could take science at the local cc instead - they admit quite openly that science is not their thing...  She'd still have time to do the whole program if she did it starting next year, but she wants to take APUSH and AP Bio next year - they don't offer APUSH yet (supposed to start 2015/16, but I'm not sure I'd trust them to have it down the first year even then), and with the science, again, that's not where I'd go...

 

Their AP Gov't course is interesting.  It's a combo of AP US Gov and AP Comparative Gov over all three semesters.  At the end you take both AP exams.  They claim 100% of their students who have attempted this have gotten 4+ on both exams.  Have no idea of the sample size, of course.  I get the feeling that there are some really smart kids doing this.  A friend also talked to them and said she got the feeling from them that a lot (most?) of the students are doing this on top of  their regular B&M school (I think most students are from outside the US).  How???  I'm wondering if maybe that's why they have younger kids -they start early and don't do the full load (full-time it would be a 2-year program; maybe most people are doing it more slowly over 4 years).

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I'm confused. If it's common for homeschoolers to take two terms instead of three, how does that work? Do they miss one-third of the content?

 

Upthread the classes are described as heavily discussion-based. Are there writing assignments? Are they graded with feedback?

 

The 2-credit classes are just one semester.  The regular AP classes may just be 2 semesters; it could be it's just the combo AP Gov class that's all 3??  But I'm not sure.

 

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The 2-credit classes are just one semester. The regular AP classes may just be 2 semesters; it could be it's just the combo AP Gov class that's all 3?? But I'm not sure.

 

Thanks for all the info! I really don't see the classes working for dd (she needs summers free for ballet intensives and academic programs), but it's always a good idea to keep an eye on options :)

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I've seen them advertise on idealist for teachers as unpaid interns. I wonder if that is how they manage to offer classes for free?

 

Here's their faculty page http://www.harari.edu.pl/about/faculty/  Looks like a wide mix of degrees and degree levels. The school is pretty new (I think maybe 2011?) and seems a pretty niche school. I don't get the impression that they have a large number of students yet, at least not for the summer session.

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Their school profile (I can't remember if it linked from the home page or the about page) lists enrollment as 150 students.

 

Some of the history teachers are still in college (a writing tutor is also still in college). I'm not too sure about that.

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Their school profile (I can't remember if it linked from the home page or the about page) lists enrollment as 150 students.

 

Some of the history teachers are still in college (a writing tutor is also still in college). I'm not too sure about that.

 

Wait, doesn't it also say somewhere on the website that the teachers all have at least a Master's?  Are they PhD candidates, or still working on BA/MA degrees?

 

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When I talked to them last month I was told that DS could take just 1 or 2 classes at a time ... like the History or Pre-AP English.  

Is anyone else just signed up for 1 or 2 classes not Foreign Language?

 

Okay, just asked again.....

Pre-AP classes need to be taken before AP classes, if you feel that your DC is capable etc.... you can get special permission to skip PRE-AP.  Regular classes, those without pre-req's are open to all and students can take 1 at a time.  Probably still need to get final Ok from admissions but seemed like it wouldn't be a big deal.  

 

I think if nothing else it is a wonderful opportunity for discussion type classes.  We live in the middle of nowhere and there aren't many options for DC to have outside classes. 

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I'm confused. If it's common for homeschoolers to take two terms instead of three, how does that work? Do they miss one-third of the content?

 

 

I was told that for the AP classes they like you to be enrolled for all three sessions. Some kids skip the summer session though and only do the other two. For some students it works, but you have to cram more info into a smaller time frame, and I got the impression that they allow it but don't recommend it. 

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Please tell us how they go...I have to admit that I wouldn't risk such courses as there is only one AP per year. So if you fail, it's not easy to redo.

 

Sometimes when you are a single parent or when you are on a fixed budget you have to take risks. It is just the way it is. 

 

I originally signed the twins up for some AP classes with PA Homeschoolers, but I realized the expense was too much. It would have taken away from our monthly budget in a way that was not doable. 

 

Then I found Harari. It seems like a good match for us. The kids are excited about it, and I am optimistically hoping it will work out. 

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When I talked to them last month I was told that DS could take just 1 or 2 classes at a time ... like the History or Pre-AP English.  

Is anyone else just signed up for 1 or 2 classes not Foreign Language?

 

Okay, just asked again.....

Pre-AP classes need to be taken before AP classes, if you feel that your DC is capable etc.... you can get special permission to skip PRE-AP.  Regular classes, those without pre-req's are open to all and students can take 1 at a time.  Probably still need to get final Ok from admissions but seemed like it wouldn't be a big deal.  

 

I think if nothing else it is a wonderful opportunity for discussion type classes.  We live in the middle of nowhere and there aren't many options for DC to have outside classes. 

 

I think the difference might be that your student is much younger?  I think it could well be that they don't mind a few classes at a time over a longer period (like, you're still at least planning on eventually getting to the full course).  If dd signed up as a junior or senior and only took a couple of courses, I think that's what they were finding unusual?  Although I'm not sure if they'd be totally against it?  More questions must be asked. :tongue_smilie:

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I think the difference might be that your student is much younger?  I think it could well be that they don't mind a few classes at a time over a longer period (like, you're still at least planning on eventually getting to the full course).  If dd signed up as a junior or senior and only took a couple of courses, I think that's what they were finding unusual?  Although I'm not sure if they'd be totally against it?  More questions must be asked. :tongue_smilie:

I actually didn't mention the ages. She didn't ask either.  I did mention when I spoke to them last month that I wasn't seeking a Diploma. 

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I was told that for the AP classes they like you to be enrolled for all three sessions. Some kids skip the summer session though and only do the other two. For some students it works, but you have to cram more info into a smaller time frame, and I got the impression that they allow it but don't recommend it. 

 

I haven't been clear yet on whether the three sessions are Pre-AP then 2 semesters of the AP class, or 3 semesters of the AP, especially for history or English, since the three/two thing is confusing to me as well. I've wondered if one could take the pre-AP English in the spring, for instance, then the 2 semesters of the AP English the following school year. I haven't pursued the question further at this point as we wouldn't be looking at even the pre-AP until the fall or spring semester at the earliest. Sounds like the government is 3 semesters of the AP since it combines the two exams? 

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I haven't been clear yet on whether the three sessions are Pre-AP then 2 semesters of the AP class, or 3 semesters of the AP, especially for history or English, since the three/two thing is confusing to me as well. I've wondered if one could take the pre-AP English in the spring, for instance, then the 2 semesters of the AP English the following school year. I haven't pursued the question further at this point as we wouldn't be looking at even the pre-AP until the fall or spring semester at the earliest. Sounds like the government is 3 semesters of the AP since it combines the two exams? 

 

The pre-AP History course is three semesters. The pre-AP English course is one semester immediately followed by the AP English course for two semesters (thus allowing some students to just take the two semesters). AP Government is for three semesters. 

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 I don't see the teachers not being paid as any more of an issue than I do for the people who volunteer to teach through somewhere like the Virtual Homeschool Group online or in our local co-op, as I presume they are volunteering of their own free will, not being press-ganged  :001_smile: . I'm grateful they're willing to do so.

...

I didn't mean in terms of fairness (I wish I had).

I meant in terms of experience and knowledge kind of thing.  But someone posted that 

some teachers are unpaid interns and that some are still in college, so that's how they can afford it.

 

No reason why it wouldn't be a good class, though.  Some people with PhDs 

can't teach, and some kids in high school are great teachers.

 

I am rooting that this program is good and real in spite of the strangeness.  Please keep us posted, Harari moms!

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I didn't mean in terms of fairness (I wish I had).

I meant in terms of experience and knowledge kind of thing.  But someone posted that 

some teachers are unpaid interns and that some are still in college, so that's how they can afford it.

 

No reason why it wouldn't be a good class, though.  Some people with PhDs 

can't teach, and some kids in high school are great teachers.

 

I am rooting that this program is good and real in spite of the strangeness.  Please keep us posted, Harari moms!

 

Out of curiosity I went through the faculty listing:

English---2 BA, 1 MA, 1 writing tutor working on a BA listed as an intern (no way to know if paid or not)

Italian and Spanish---both MA

Chinese--working on MA

Math--MqF from Rutgers (Master of Quantitative Finance)

Economics--MA

Government/history--2 working on PhD, 1 JD, and 2 that appear to be working on BA's (though one of those may actually be working on a higher degree, it's a bit unclear)

History/geography-- working on MA

The principal is listed as a "scholar of Islamic Studies and Arabic linguistics and literature" with no specific level of degree named (though I believe he has at least one  master's), vice principal has an MA in comparative literature, the accessibility officer is a PhD in Japanese literature (all three also teach various classes)

 

I don't know how they afford it---my presumption was volunteer teachers, but that may be incorrect.

 

I am also hopeful that this turns out to be a good fit. My biggest reservations at this point are the somewhat unusual scheduling of semesters and lack of clear, readily accessible info on the classes and schedules, at least not as clear and accessible as far in advance as I'd like them to be (but then that latter is a complaint I have about many programs). I'm not wild about the idea of giving up other opportunities in the summers, so that may limit what we can do with this group.

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From their "About" page:

 

"We accept students from all over the world: homeschooled students, students who feel not challenged enough in their “day-schoolsâ€, international students who wish to get into the most luxurious colleges."

 

Do students get a mint on their pillow each night? When the sheets are turned down?

 

I wonder how the colleges around us rate in the "luxurious" category.

 

Maybe the teachers are unpaid interns? http://www.letsintern.com/internship/Others-internships/Harari-College-Worldwide/Affect-global-education-Online-international-high-school-internships/10430

 

Unless they start paying them after an internship period? Looks like they're looking for a lot of unpaid people, though.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I emailed admissions about the availability of a Spanish class this fall, and yes there will be one.  Also the fall schedule won't be up until sometime in July... 

 

I talked to them about Spanish as well.  What level are you looking at?  They said mostly their language offerings are 1:1 because of different levels.  They said they thought they could get us a teacher for the fall (AP level), so I'm a-hoping.  Yes, details sometime in July...

 

It is making me a bit nervous to rely on them for this - since it's free, I feel like what happens if they flake out?  I'm very eager to hear from anyone that's been using them this summer about how it's going...

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I'm nervous and intrigued about it too.  I would love to try it for just one class and see how it goes.  I'll be watching for everyone's experiences.   I did ask them about taking just one class, they said it was unusual, but they would be willing to work with us.

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DS would be beginner level Spanish and I wouldn't ask much from them.  I could probably get him through first year on my own but it would really be great if he had someone fluent to practice on once a week.  I understand about the nervous/excited at the possibilities, that's why we're just going to do 1 class.  If it works then we could try 2 the next semester/year.  Whatever works for us.  I pretty much have our H.S. plan laid out and there are very few holes that Harari could fill but I'm willing to rearrange for a good program that's free. 

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Dd just took her first two classes this afternoon. Her third class "meets" Friday--survey of Roman history, pre-AP world history, and pre-AP English Lit. So far everything has been professional.

Cool, I would be very interested in your impressions as she advances through the course.  I'm interested in things like: Rigor, ease of use, what actual grade level, could a younger student (8th grade) handle the course, amount of assignments/writing/reading is required, what curriculum do they use (cost of materials), etc.... 

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The twins have been in the school for two days. I wanted to share my impressions so far. I am positive it will change as we progress further through the program. 

 

My son is in four classes plus a language, and my daughter is taking five classes plus a language. The school seems very heavy on writing and quite rigorous to me. Even prior to the first day the twins had a few assignments due and only a few days into it they both have quite a bit of homework. This includes responding to discussions, reading, and writing short responses to questions. After looking through the syllabus it seems like there are a few papers due in each class (per term) and several projects, including a few year-long research projects that the student needs to be working on all year. The material for the classes is all online, even the textbooks and other readings, so there is no cost to the student. This is a positive for us, but I can see how some people might not like it. 

 

The teachers vary in age, but some are quite young. If you don't want younger, inexperienced teachers for your children you would probably not like this school. My kids like all the teachers so far, and they do seem knowledgeable about their subjects. 

 

Other first impressions...my kids have received direct feedback on their writing in their first pre-AP English assignment which I was happy about. The technology works great. The school uses Moodle. Their language instruction is done via Skype, and it is probably one of the stronger points of the program. My daughter's teacher is in Italy and she only has two students. It seems like the kids are going to have a good deal of time speaking the language with a native speaker which also makes me happy. 

 

As far as what age/grade is this best for I would have to say at least a ninth grader if they are very academic. For most students I would say tenth or eleventh as the student needs to be quite self-motivated, independent, and organized. 

 

That's it for now. I'll update throughout the year as we progress through the program.  :)

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The twins have been in the school for two days. I wanted to share my impressions so far. I am positive it will change as we progress further through the program. 

 

My son is in four classes plus a language, and my daughter is taking five classes plus a language. The school seems very heavy on writing and quite rigorous to me. Even prior to the first day the twins had a few assignments due and only a few days into it they both have quite a bit of homework. This includes responding to discussions, reading, and writing short responses to questions. After looking through the syllabus it seems like there are a few papers due in each class (per term) and several projects, including a few year-long research projects that the student needs to be working on all year. The material for the classes is all online, even the textbooks and other readings, so there is no cost to the student. This is a positive for us, but I can see how some people might not like it. 

 

The teachers vary in age, but some are quite young. If you don't want younger, inexperienced teachers for your children you would probably not like this school. My kids like all the teachers so far, and they do seem knowledgeable about their subjects. 

 

Other first impressions...my kids have received direct feedback on their writing in their first pre-AP English assignment which I was happy about. The technology works great. The school uses Moodle. Their language instruction is done via Skype, and it is probably one of the stronger points of the program. My daughter's teacher is in Italy and she only has two students. It seems like the kids are going to have a good deal of time speaking the language with a native speaker which also makes me happy. 

 

As far as what age/grade is this best for I would have to say at least a ninth grader if they are very academic. For most students I would say tenth or eleventh as the student needs to be quite self-motivated, independent, and organized. 

 

That's it for now. I'll update throughout the year as we progress through the program.  :)

Thank you, that is very helpful.  I was concerned that DS who is younger and not a good writer would struggle, I guess I was right.  This helps me decide that it would be better to wait awhile.  I would still love to hear how it goes for your DC.  Especially the language classes as that is what I'm most interested in....

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HI, 

I'm new to the forums, although I've been a lurker for a long time. Homeschooling mother of a soon to be 13 year looking ahead at high school options so this discussion was timely. 

 

This topic prompted me to register at the forum here, just to add some words of caution. 

Something about this program set me off. I decided to look up the name of the principal, Orel Beilinson, who says he is a "Scholar of Islamic Studies and Arabic Linguistics and Literature". 

 

Here is what his LinkedIn page says / direct copy and paste:

 

Tel Aviv University Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Arabic Language and Literature and Semitic Linguistics2013 â€“ 2016 (expected)
Universitas Muhammadiyah Sukabumi Bachelor of Arts (BA), Islamic Studies and Arabic Language2012 â€“ 2015 (expected)

So, so far it seems he does not even have a Bachelor Degree from Tel Aviv University, and he is also in process of obtaining a Bachelor Degree form an obscure university in Indonesia?!

 

I don't think people need PhD degrees to be able to teach their children or home school, but if you advertise that you are a 'scholar' of something, and then it turns out that you don't even have a Bachelor Degree...it just leaves a bad taste in my mouth. 

 

Just wanted to add that in hopes it does help someone. 

 

 

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HI, 

I'm new to the forums, although I've been a lurker for a long time. Homeschooling mother of a soon to be 13 year looking ahead at high school options so this discussion was timely. 

 

This topic prompted me to register at the forum here, just to add some words of caution. 

Something about this program set me off. I decided to look up the name of the principal, Orel Beilinson, who says he is a "Scholar of Islamic Studies and Arabic Linguistics and Literature". 

 

Here is what his LinkedIn page says / direct copy and paste:

 

 

 

Tel Aviv University Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Arabic Language and Literature and Semitic Linguistics 2013 â€“ 2016 (expected)

 

 

 

 

Universitas Muhammadiyah Sukabumi Bachelor of Arts (BA), Islamic Studies and Arabic Language 2012 â€“ 2015 (expected)

 

 

So, so far it seems he does not even have a Bachelor Degree from Tel Aviv University, and he is also in process of obtaining a Bachelor Degree form an obscure university in Indonesia?!

 

I don't think people need PhD degrees to be able to teach their children or home school, but if you advertise that you are a 'scholar' of something, and then it turns out that you don't even have a Bachelor Degree...it just leaves a bad taste in my mouth. 

 

Just wanted to add that in hopes it does help someone.

Thanks for the info -- I wouldn't necessarily write someone off who didn't have a BA in the topic, because teaching to the AP test probably doesn't require that. (Another reason why AP tests are probably not something to get too enthusiastic about).

 

Doing well on the AP is more about understanding how it works -- but one can get that fairly easily out of prep books. His advice does seem to be gleaned out of prep books and the AP teacher forums, and is therefore pretty easy to come up with on one's own. The student can do this themselves, if the parent doesn't want to do the work.

 

And his background does make one wonder.

 

If I were going to be using this course, I'd be sure to have a Plan B. But I always have a Plan B. Lots of promising things don't work out.

 

The big issue would be getting involved in something that might be a big time waster. It might be better to cut to the chase and just get some prep books. To be honest, the history tests can be studied for just using the prep books. You really don't need anything else. My kid got a 5 on the APUSH without actually touching a real text book -- or doing any of those other enriching things that one might want in an actual course. And you really don't need to write a coherent essay. It just needs to hit the facts.

 

The science and math tests require more of an actual text book and probably someone who knows the material. Although..... well, when I see some kids taking oodles of AP tests, I begin to wonder if understanding the material is just an impediment to getting a lot of tests taken. It might be possible to get a reasonable score without actually doing the course, or even understanding the material well.

 

These issues are why I've never really pushed the AP tests much on my kids. They do the ones they want, which isn't much. And I don't see that doing any more would have made college easier on my eldest (who just finished). In fact, the only one that ever helped her was the Calc test. To be honest, that's the only one I'd ever suggest anyone take. And I'm not sure it gave her the best background. (But she's overcome that issue by now)

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I probably shouldn't reply to topics about my school, but that's my reply:

 

My academic situation is "kind-of" funny. When I was a high school student I began taking (too many) graduate courses in Tel Aviv University (Islamic + Classical History). Shortly afterwards I began writing for encyclopaedias (having a dissertation proposal and much of it written) such as the Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Postcolonial Studies (to be published by Blackwell) and "The Islamic World: An Encyclopaedia of History, Culture, and Society" (to be published by M.E. Sharpe). I began lecturing in conferences (such as ATINER 2013) as well as working on a book proposal for Cambridge University Press. I am now "completing" the official BA requirements to get everything I completed. 

 

I taught for a while in Oranim College of Education in Israel and in the Islamic Online University (courses in biblical historiography, classical history and classical Hebrew philology) which allowed me to serve as an AP reader (this year is my 4th year) and as a consultant to various publishers (now working as a World History reviewer for Boundless after peer-reviewing titles for OUP). I am also an IB consultant, and work with exam boards providing A-Levels on exams in Islamic Studies, History, English Literature, Arabic, and Biblical Hebrew.

 

A fun fact: Dr. Yuval Noah Harari (no relation to my school) and I are the only Israeli researchers that 'do' World History. Only one university here had a course in World History, and even that only for 2 hours a week for one semester.

 

And now enough about me - I welcome you to join any of our live classes to see our quality in person. My next class is going to start soon (1:00pm EST) - AP World History (which I also teach on Mondays at the same time). I also teach tomorrow (9:00 am EST) Classical Arabic I + Pre-AP English on Tuesdays and Fridays (11:00 am EST).

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I was drafting a long reply, but it was quickly veering into "someone is wrong on the internet" territory.

 

I would suggest that interested families search the addresses listed for Harari. It looks to me that both the CA and Belgian addresses are forwarding services (something like using a UPS Store as your business address). 

 

Look over the academic qualifications of the listed faculty.  How many of the counselors have a degree or experience in counseling or education?  How many degrees are from online colleges?  How many courses are taught by current college students? 

 

I'm not suggesting that only someone with a PhD in a subject or a teaching certificate is a qualified or quality teacher. I am suggesting that many of the teachers of courses seem to have limited experience with teaching AP courses and some may find themselves quite busy with being students themselves as well as teaching online course sections.

 

There are a few other things that I ran into searching that strike me as odd, but I'll just say that I think it's worth some research and healthy skepticism. It might not have tuition. But there may be a significant opportunity cost. 

 

On the internet, no one knows you're a dog. ~New Yorker Cartoon

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Does Harari College have an actual physical presence somewhere?  The US address comes up as a light industrial complex, with several trucking companies and international reshippers using the same address.  The Belgian address is slightly nicer, but

 

Our CA and Belgian addresses are mainly for post processing. As our team is pretty much all around the globe, we have no "central" office. 

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Hmmmm, I think I'm going to go with the more optimistic approach when considering Harari. First it's free.  I can't say how great that is.  Second other trusted HSer's are taking classes this Summer and are willing to give honest impressions here on the boards (thank you Jilly and vcoots).  Third, the "teachers" have as much if not more Education as I do and I'm doing pretty good so far (Humanities are easy to teach-Math and Science not so much).  Lastly, there is no way I can teach a full H.S. Spanish program, first year, maybe.  I can not afford what even the cheapest online programs cost, the possibility of "wasting" my time is a risk I'm willing to take.  Plus how much time am I really wasting? An hour or two a week and at most a semester?

 

On a side note, not all paths through Education are the same, obviously, so I really don't fault the people at Harari for not having the standard degrees/paths.  

 

 

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Hmmmm, I think I'm going to go with the more optimistic approach when considering Harari. First it's free. I can't say how great that is. Second other trusted HSer's are taking classes this Summer and are willing to give honest impressions here on the boards (thank you Jilly and vcoots). Third, the "teachers" have as much if not more Education as I do and I'm doing pretty good so far (Humanities are easy to teach-Math and Science not so much). Lastly, there is no way I can teach a full H.S. Spanish program, first year, maybe. I can not afford what even the cheapest online programs cost, the possibility of "wasting" my time is a risk I'm willing to take. Plus how much time am I really wasting? An hour or two a week and at most a semester?

 

On a side note, not all paths through Education are the same, obviously, so I really don't fault the people at Harari for not having the standard degrees/paths.

I agree!!

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Hmmmm, I think I'm going to go with the more optimistic approach when considering Harari. First it's free.  I can't say how great that is.  Second other trusted HSer's are taking classes this Summer and are willing to give honest impressions here on the boards (thank you Jilly and vcoots).  Third, the "teachers" have as much if not more Education as I do and I'm doing pretty good so far (Humanities are easy to teach-Math and Science not so much).  Lastly, there is no way I can teach a full H.S. Spanish program, first year, maybe.  I can not afford what even the cheapest online programs cost, the possibility of "wasting" my time is a risk I'm willing to take.  Plus how much time am I really wasting? An hour or two a week and at most a semester?

 

On a side note, not all paths through Education are the same, obviously, so I really don't fault the people at Harari for not having the standard degrees/paths.  

 

Agreed. I'm also excited about the chance for my student to participate with students living in other areas of the world. She knows people who are *from* other countries, but they are still living in this culture, which is different. This summer, her interaction will only be with her Spanish instructor, but I am keeping options open for later on.  I'm approaching Harari the same way I approached the Virtual Homeschool Group, our local high school co-op, and will be approaching the free part-time program our local school system is providing homeschoolers this fall---cautious optimism. :)

 

BTW, my daughter is taking Spanish 2 and her first assignment is to write a 75 word introduction so that the instructor can evaluate her writing level in Spanish. This is a significant step up from the requirements she had at the end of Spanish 1 through another provider.

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Just spoke with them, they are offering Hebrew this fall!! I queried them on funding, no specifics, just 'private' funding...I'm a little curious as to how we can find where they get their funding...but hope to have my daughters take 2 course in the Fall..they said they were registering now....I don't like giving loads of personal information to organizations if I can't know their funding/agenda...hmmm...

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