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On 4/12/2019 at 9:09 PM, Spy Car said:

I hate to be an "alarmist" but it is important to exercise caution with milkweed. Wear latex gloves. Wash up. Keep kids away. Never rub your eyes.

Bill 


I never knew this! We grow it, it grows wild everywhere in the ditches here, and we pick it often to keep catepillars in the house - never knew until this moment that it could sting!

On 4/13/2019 at 8:55 PM, Terabith said:

I don't have a garden, but our yard is utterly covered in dandelions.  It's glorious!


A girl after my own heart - I adore dandelions.  Most people think they are akin to the plague.

 

On 4/27/2019 at 6:45 PM, MaBelle said:

I very rarely see snails in my yard, wonder if it's the chicken's doings?

 


It might be the area you live in.  Here?  Snails aren't really an issue and you might see one occasionally.  The first time we saw a banana slug in the PNW we thought it was the result of some horrible nuclear incident. Snails & slugs are rampant and a real gardening problem out there.  We don't stay damp enough, I think.  I am a solid gardener in the Midwest, but wretched at it in the PNW.

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203AB3E5-B4CF-48D9-A16F-EB7E23F899D1.jpeg

 

Got the flower garden weeded, planted some annuals, replaced dead lavender & a few dianthus, mulched.  Fall: Plant more tulips!
The dead little spindly oak to the left is NOT dead!! So excited!

 

Last night and this weekend - tilled the area for sweetcorn and potatoes.  Planted tomatoes, peppers, peas, greens, broccoli, and brussel sprouts, and some herbs.  Strawberries and rhubarb are growing great!  Need to build two more beds and plant carrots & celery, black beauty zucchini, and acorn squash! Then done!

63D31EA6-B069-4819-AB3C-5F598B2B5A71.jpeg

Planted an apricot tree, a plum tree, two cherries, and replaced a dead peach.

This winter was record breaking snow and cold (wind chill of -50 on one day!)  It was rough.  My blueberries were really shocked, but it looks like they are actually ALIVE!  My hydrangeas are still questionable as is the maple in the lower left.  Drat.

 

Edited by BlsdMama
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2 hours ago, BlsdMama said:


I never knew this! We grow it, it grows wild everywhere in the ditches here, and we pick it often to keep catepillars in the house - never knew until this moment that it could sting!

Milkweed is essential to the preservation of Monarchs. I hate raising a caution because I understand how important it is to Monarch's survival.

People just need to take reasonable precautions not to get the sap (the "milk" in milkweed) in their eyes.

Bill

 

 

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On 4/12/2019 at 8:57 PM, Spy Car said:

I had an acquaintance who was the head of the local butterfly club here in SoCal. He and his wife had a wonderful butterfly garden and they raised Monarchs.

He was fully aware of how dangerous it is to get milkweed sap in one's eyes, Still, one day while gardening he trimmed some plants and then wiped his eyes.

He was rushed to the hospital (the leading eye institute in the city) and there was talk he might lose his vision. Thankfully he did not.

Growing milkweed is a great kindness for Monarchs. But it is irresponsible IMO for groups and seed providers not to give adequate warnings about the sap (the "milk") in milkweed. The dangers to one's eyes from the sap are almost never mentioned. 

Bill

 

 

I was unaware of this as well. Milkweed grows wild here. When I was a kid, I used to pick the pods and pull the fluff out all the time. Lucky for me I never got sap in my eyes!

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First harvest!

I've been getting a small handful of blueberries every 4-5 days for the past 3 weeks from the 3 new blueberry plants I bought back in February and planted in a barrel. I scattered branches from the Christmas tree (I snipped and saved them when we took the tree down) around for mulch and to add acid to the soil. What a treat to be rewarded so soon!

blueberries.jpg

Edited by Lori D.
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Man, I wish I could grow berries here. Last time I tried, it looked like a scene from Hitchcock in my yard. And the birds won.

If I can rig up some protection, I’ll try again. 

I’m jealous of everyone’s fruit trees, too. Why must they take so long to grow?! And carrots, broccoli, and the like. Why must they need more temperate climates?!

I was looking at a Pasta Primavera recipe online this evening to use zucchini and squash. Need bell peppers for it. Think I’ll plant some bell peppers in pots this weekend. 

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Just now, aggie96 said:

Man, I wish I could grow berries here. Last time I tried, it looked like a scene from Hitchcock in my yard. And the birds won.
If I can rig up some protection, I’ll try again. 
I’m jealous of everyone’s fruit trees, too. Why must they take so long to grow?! And carrots, broccoli, and the like. Why must they need more temperate climates?!
I was looking at a Pasta Primavera recipe online this evening to use zucchini and squash. Need bell peppers for it. Think I’ll plant some bell peppers in pots this weekend. 


aggie96, I am in a hotter dryer climate than you, so we'll see how the blueberries survive as the year progresses...

Next week's gardening goal is to rig shade cloth over everything. That's going to be a feat to rival the loading the old 3-masted ships with sail and rigging... (:D

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re poison ivy

On April 30, 2019 at 5:17 PM, Innisfree said:

Okay gardeners, here's a question.

I've just cleaned a bunch of poison ivy out from under my beanpoles: really two metal posts with heavy plastic fencing stretched between them, for the beans to climb. It had been a couple of years since I used that area of the garden, and the poison ivy had crept in. It had also climbed the plastic fence in a couple of spots.

Would you have any hesitation about letting the beans go on and climb up the same fencing? Would you try to clean it, or assume the elements will break down the poison ivy residue sufficiently to make harvesting and eating the beans safe? I hate to toss it out and start over. Possibly I could wash it. The beans are normally held an inch or two out from the fencing by their petioles, but the last thing I want to do is feed everyone poison-ivied beans.

It definitely depends on how sensitive you are, but at a bare minimum I'd thoroughly wash with soap.  The spores hang on for a long time. I'm sensitive, and it's in the woods all around me and trails over from the neighbors and is not visible until the leaves grow in, and although I am crazy careful (like, I run inside the house, strip all my clothes directly into the laundry and proceed directly to the shower as soon as I lay eyes on it, having dispatched my less-sensitive husband to actually deal with it) I still get at least one cortisone-shot-requiring case every year from the shears or the hose or the rake tines or something else that's touched it.

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Possibly some sort of mowing is needed?

 

 

CF6E9ED6-F200-4B60-9848-75DF30A0DFB9.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Lori D. said:

First harvest!

I've been getting a small handful of blueberries every 4-5 days for the past 3 weeks from the 3 new blueberry plants I bought back in February and planted in a barrel. I scattered branches from the Christmas tree (I snipped and saved them when we took the tree down) around for mulch and to add acid to the soil. What a treat to be rewarded so soon!

blueberries.jpg

 

Our are only flowering...  clearly you’re in a warmer place

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19 minutes ago, Pen said:

Our are only flowering...  clearly you’re in a warmer place


Zone 9b, where, in about 1 month from now, it will be so hot that you can actually, really and truly, fry an egg on a car hood or sidewalk. (:D

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Well it’s May 8 and it’s snowing- the ground is white again in areas. Glad it won’t hurt my rhubarb or asparagus.🤣

I just got an alert- we are under winter weather advisory with 4+ inches snow and blowing winds. I have to laugh.

i am enjoying all your garden photos though:

Edited by history-fan
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On 5/7/2019 at 7:05 AM, BlsdMama said:

203AB3E5-B4CF-48D9-A16F-EB7E23F899D1.jpeg

 

Got the flower garden weeded, planted some annuals, replaced dead lavender & a few dianthus, mulched.  Fall: Plant more tulips!
The dead little spindly oak to the left is NOT dead!! So excited!

 

Last night and this weekend - tilled the area for sweetcorn and potatoes.  Planted tomatoes, peppers, peas, greens, broccoli, and brussel sprouts, and some herbs.  Strawberries and rhubarb are growing great!  Need to build two more beds and plant carrots & celery, black beauty zucchini, and acorn squash! Then done!

63D31EA6-B069-4819-AB3C-5F598B2B5A71.jpeg

Planted an apricot tree, a plum tree, two cherries, and replaced a dead peach.

This winter was record breaking snow and cold (wind chill of -50 on one day!)  It was rough.  My blueberries were really shocked, but it looks like they are actually ALIVE!  My hydrangeas are still questionable as is the maple in the lower left.  Drat.

 

 

Hmmm we have baby maples like weeds  all over. If you were near you could have one or a a bunch. 

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1 hour ago, Lori D. said:


Zone 9b, where, in about 1 month from now, it will be so hot that you can actually, really and truly, fry an egg on a car hood or sidewalk. (:D

 

Didn’t realize I am in Zone 9b too. I have tried growing blackberries successfully in my patio but have not tried blueberries. June is hot enough to bake cookies in a homemade pizza box solar oven. 

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42 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

Hmmm we have baby maples like weeds  all over. If you were near you could have one or a a bunch. 

This is poplars in my yard--the neighbors have a row of big poplar trees along the fence line and their progeny are all over my yard.

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1 hour ago, Pen said:

 

Hmmm we have baby maples like weeds  all over. If you were near you could have one or a a bunch. 

Be careful with maples...we have a big one in the front yard and the roots are notorious for spreading EVERYWHERE. Almost my entire yard is a dense mat of maple roots just under (and in some place just above) the dirt. Made it SO hard to plant the flower beds because the roots are everywhere. 

1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

 

Didn’t realize I am in Zone 9b too. I have tried growing blackberries successfully in my patio but have not tried blueberries. June is hot enough to bake cookies in a homemade pizza box solar oven. 

I'm zone 9b as well! 

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12 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Be careful with maples...we have a big one in the front yard and the roots are notorious for spreading EVERYWHERE. Almost my entire yard is a dense mat of maple roots just under (and in some place just above) the dirt. Made it SO hard to plant the flower beds because the roots are everywhere. 

 

So true!  We also have a weed plum problem.  They are even worse than maples for taking over.  Italian prune type plums wher I don’t even like the fruit that much.  Plus they take a long time to reach fruiting— but rapidly cause dense mats of baby trees, much of which comes up from a single dense root mat.

 

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18 hours ago, Lori D. said:

First harvest!

I've been getting a small handful of blueberries every 4-5 days for the past 3 weeks from the 3 new blueberry plants I bought back in February and planted in a barrel. I scattered branches from the Christmas tree (I snipped and saved them when we took the tree down) around for mulch and to add acid to the soil. What a treat to be rewarded so soon!

blueberries.jpg


Jealous.  We planted blueberries three years in a row.  Dead, dead, dead.  I've amended the soil to an unbelievable level of effort.  This year, when I thought they were all dead, I honestly questioned my sanity and whether I'd plant them again.  But, they are a remnant of our time in Oregon so I fight on, lol.  Plus, they are SO pretty in the fall and I love the idea of landscaping with food.  I have high bush on the West side of the garden and half-highs on the south side of the house. ❤️ I dutifully pulled every bloom off the healthy one this year so it could put more energy into the plant.  Crying crossed my mind.

 

17 hours ago, aggie96 said:

Man, I wish I could grow berries here. Last time I tried, it looked like a scene from Hitchcock in my yard. And the birds won.

If I can rig up some protection, I’ll try again. 

I’m jealous of everyone’s fruit trees, too. Why must they take so long to grow?! And carrots, broccoli, and the like. Why must they need more temperate climates?!

I was looking at a Pasta Primavera recipe online this evening to use zucchini and squash. Need bell peppers for it. Think I’ll plant some bell peppers in pots this weekend. 


They do take SO long - but just think, you'll STILL feel sad in five years.  Just plant a few this year and in 3-5 years, you'll be getting the first harvest instead.  We planted the first apple tree on Mother's Day the first year here, five years ago.  It will almost certainly have a "real" crop this year.  Then we added a few trees each year.  Grandpa always grew awful Iowa peaches (a pit and some skin essentially) and was certain I could not grow "real" peaches here.  He had a peach out of our first peaches the season before he died.  He really enjoyed that peach.  It's a very fond memory for me.


*LOL, I'm starting to realize how emotionally attached I am to growing things.  It's been a generational thing that I shared with my parents and especially my grandpa and now my kids.  I hate knick-knacks and don't love clutter, but no one should ever let me in a garden store.

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16 minutes ago, BlsdMama said:


Jealous.  We planted blueberries three years in a row.  Dead, dead, dead.  I've amended the soil to an unbelievable level of effort.  This year, when I thought they were all dead, I honestly questioned my sanity and whether I'd plant them again.  But, they are a remnant of our time in Oregon so I fight on, lol.  Plus, they are SO pretty in the fall and I love the idea of landscaping with food.  I have high bush on the West side of the garden and half-highs on the south side of the house. ❤️ I dutifully pulled every bloom off the healthy one this year so it could put more energy into the plant.  Crying crossed my mind.

 


They do take SO long - but just think, you'll STILL feel sad in five years.  Just plant a few this year and in 3-5 years, you'll be getting the first harvest instead.  We planted the first apple tree on Mother's Day the first year here, five years ago.  It will almost certainly have a "real" crop this year.  Then we added a few trees each year.  Grandpa always grew awful Iowa peaches (a pit and some skin essentially) and was certain I could not grow "real" peaches here.  He had a peach out of our first peaches the season before he died.  He really enjoyed that peach.  It's a very fond memory for me.


*LOL, I'm starting to realize how emotionally attached I am to growing things.  It's been a generational thing that I shared with my parents and especially my grandpa and now my kids.  I hate knick-knacks and don't love clutter, but no one should ever let me in a garden store.

 

Growing things fills a real emotional need for me as well. My grandparents all came from farming families, my dad grew up on a farm and I spent my early years on the same farm. 

We moved to this house right years ago and my first fruit trees were planted within a month. I've also added more every year, though I am running out of space.

If someone wants an early producing fruit tree I recommend the Illinois Everbearing mulberry tree--grows quickly and produces delicious berries for most of the summer.

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1 hour ago, BlsdMama said:

...We planted blueberries three years in a row.  Dead, dead, dead.  I've amended the soil to an unbelievable level of effort.  This year, when I thought they were all dead, I honestly questioned my sanity and whether I'd plant them again.  But, they are a remnant of our time in Oregon so I fight on, lol.  Plus, they are SO pretty in the fall and I love the idea of landscaping with food.  I have high bush on the West side of the garden and half-highs on the south side of the house. ❤️ I dutifully pulled every bloom off the healthy one this year so it could put more energy into the plant.  Crying crossed my mind.


😥 Oh SOOO sad along with you! I totally feel your pain. This is the third year I've bought and planted blueberries -- they need SOOOO much babying to make it here in the desert. Don't know if this batch will make it through the summer, so I'm probably celebrating prematurely, lol.
 

...I'm starting to realize how emotionally attached I am to growing things... I hate knick-knacks and don't love clutter, but no one should ever let me in a garden store.


Me too! Love the nurturing of living things -- plants, pets, and my little people (not little any more, lol).

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I'm another who has put a ridiculous amount of effort into blueberries with little return, our soil isn't right for them. I've got mine growing mostly in peat moss now, with lots of blueberry specific fertilizer. We'll see how they do this year.

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7 minutes ago, maize said:

I'm another who has put a ridiculous amount of effort into blueberries with little return, our soil isn't right for them. I've got mine growing mostly in peat moss now, with lots of blueberry specific fertilizer. We'll see how they do this year.


I know. It's sort of sad to be so obsessed about growing a particular plant that just isn't suited for your area, isn't it... 🤪 Apparently this is my gardening MO: "But if I just try doing ________ this time, surely it won't die again!" 😂

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2 hours ago, BlsdMama said:

 We planted blueberries three years in a row.  Dead, dead, dead.  I've amended the soil to an unbelievable level of effort.  This year, when I thought they were all dead, I honestly questioned my sanity and whether I'd plant them again. 

 

My friends and I plant berries in big terra-cotta pots. It is easier to control PH of soil that way. I also dump coffee grounds and tea from used tea bags weekly into the pots. My kids drink lots of tea while I drink lots of coffee so I have a good supply of spent tea leaves and coffee grounds. 

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I’m in Oregon— excellent area for blueberries.  However, weather and blueberry blights have made it hard even here.  

However it is easier to grow blueberries than bananas here

Edited by Pen
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2 hours ago, Arcadia said:

My friends and I plant berries in big terra-cotta pots. It is easier to control PH of soil that way. I also dump coffee grounds and tea from used tea bags weekly into the pots. My kids drink lots of tea while I drink lots of coffee so I have a good supply of spent tea leaves and coffee grounds. 


YES! This gives me hope. I have my blueberries in a barrel, and regularly dump DH's coffee grounds on them. (:D

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I moved the mesh covering to allow room for my lettuce to grow, and dd's chooks got in and ate it all! 😫
But there wasn't room enough for them to scratch it all up, so they should regrow. Luckily they are the loose leaf cos types.

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1 hour ago, Rosie_0801 said:

I moved the mesh covering to allow room for my lettuce to grow, and dd's chooks got in and ate it all! 😫
But there wasn't room enough for them to scratch it all up, so they should regrow. Luckily they are the loose leaf cos types.

Chickens are so helpful at times aren't they?

I was digging my garden this afternoon in preparation for planting and the chickens were making it almost impossible; in their eagerness to make sure they didn't miss a single juicy worm as it was dug up they were practically on top of my shovel.

The chickens will be relegated to one side of the yard away from the garden once I get it planted.

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40 minutes ago, maize said:

I ordered these red sweet corn seeds and am looking forward to planting them:

https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/corn/corn-ruby-queen-hybrid-prod000673.html

 

My kids would go for the Popcorn Strawberry, Full Season Suntava Purple Hybrid, and the Ornamental Glass Gem when we go to the Pumpkin Patches in autumn.

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I don't think I shared the photo of our little butterfly garden yet - it's right outside our giant kitchen window so we can see it from the kitchen table. So far just bees and love bugs, and one blue jay eating the love bugs. We have had butterflies in the front bed though - on the lantana that is there. 

SMA4xE4eQSGC31Uz9y6ung.jpg

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Ah gardens, I love seeing all the pictures.

I currently have:

  • two bleeding hearts that have sprouted from last year's planting - can't wait to see how they grow
  • no hostas sprouting in the front yard yet - north facing, so I guess there is still hope?
  • three of the backyard hostas have sprouted!
  • strawberries in the raised bed appear to be over achieving and already have flowers - we may get strawberries this year!
  • none of the strawberries in the ground have sprouted yet
  • the raspberry canes are still wrapped in the evergreen bushes - maybe I'll get those evergreens out this year. Eagerly anticipating raspberries, since they did berry last year.

 

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We've had such an unusually mild spring here (it's usually 100˚ by this time every May), that plants are bustin' out all over!

1. Tomatoes -- the biggest yellow pear variety cherry tomatoes we've ever grown -- and tasty!
2. Blackberries -- only about the size of my pinkie fingernail, but at least I *got* some finally!
3. Cilantro -- from just 2 seedlings, the plants grew to be over 3 feet high, and now are a sea of blossoms that will turn in to coriander seeds.
4. Roses -- my iceberg climbing roses died last year, so I bought 2 bare-root replacements; they arrived in mid-March, and here they are 2 months later -- covered in green leaves, pushing out lots of buds -- and blooming!

What are your gardens doing now?

tomatoes.jpg

blackberries.jpg

cilantro.jpg

rose.jpg

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I'm seeing if I can salvage my rosemary plant. I didn't log when I was watering it so I'm pretty sure I OVER-watered it, even though
I know better. Plus, where I live I can't put it outside yet (too cold), so it doesn't really get any direct sunlight. May have to re-think this.
Or suck it up and be done with the experiment - had to grow my own herbs for the herbal course I'm in - finish the course and move on. 
Maybe, when I know where I'll be on a more permanent basis, I'll establish a container garden area in my house or rv with a broad spectrum light so it can get what it needs.

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On 5/9/2019 at 1:25 PM, Lori D. said:


YES! This gives me hope. I have my blueberries in a barrel, and regularly dump DH's coffee grounds on them. (:D

another tip is to run your coffeemaker one more time without removing the used grounds. This gives a very weak and undrinkable brown liquid. Cool it, dilute it and water your citrus, berries etc. It immediately perks up the plants.

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51 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

We've had such an unusually mild spring here (it's usually 100˚ by this time every May), that plants are bustin' out all over!

1. Tomatoes -- the biggest yellow pear variety cherry tomatoes we've ever grown -- and tasty!
2. Blackberries -- only about the size of my pinkie fingernail, but at least I *got* some finally!
3. Cilantro -- from just 2 seedlings, the plants grew to be over 3 feet high, and now are a sea of blossoms that will turn in to coriander seeds.
4. Roses -- my iceberg climbing roses died last year, so I bought 2 bare-root replacements; they arrived in mid-March, and here they are 2 months later -- covered in green leaves, pushing out lots of buds -- and blooming!

What are your gardens doing now?

tomatoes.jpg

blackberries.jpg

cilantro.jpg

rose.jpg

 

 

We must be pretty close proximity. I hear thunder and it is about to rain. Crazy for LA in May.

I picked up four bush form Icebergs to plant today. That won't happen due to rain.

I also planted Iceberg climbers this Winter (not bare root) and they are going gangbusters.

This unusual wet California rainy season has been very good for the garden.

 

Bill

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Spy Car said:

... We must be pretty close proximity. I hear thunder and it is about to rain. Crazy for LA in May... This unusual wet California rainy season has been very good for the garden.


If you are in CA, then I am a state or two away... 😉 

Glad you are having a great spring too! Isn't it amazing having an actual spring this year, to see plants grow, bloom, fruit, take off! (:D

Edited by Lori D.
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My strawberries are happy this year, they seem to like the foliar fertilizer I am trying out.

I tasted my first honeyberry of the year. Not really ripe yet but I'm desperate for fresh garden fruit and it tasted good anyway. Honeyberries are so tantalizing because they turn blue a couple of weeks before they are really ripe.

The climbing rose by the house is blooming and my other roses are putting out buds.

strawberries.jpg

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In other news I'm almost finished putting up a chicken fence so I can plant corn. I'm trying out a red sweet corn variety and a purple popcorn variety that is supposed to good when eaten young like sweetcorn.

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16 minutes ago, maize said:

I tasted my first honeyberry of the year. Not really ripe yet but I'm desperate for fresh garden fruit and it tasted good anyway. Honeyberries are so tantalizing because they turn blue a couple of weeks before they are really ripe.

 

 

I’m interested in honeyberries.  I’ve heard they can tolerate more shade than blueberries.  Do you have any variety to recommend or tips about them?

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3 hours ago, Pen said:

 

 

 

I’m interested in honeyberries.  I’ve heard they can tolerate more shade than blueberries.  Do you have any variety to recommend or tips about them?

I planted my first honeyberries three years ago, got just a couple of berries last year, looks like there will be more this year. 

I have polar jewel, borealis, blue moon, and blue velvet. I think the one with fruit ripening is borealis; I like the fruit but haven't tasted others to compare, that's the only one of mine that has produced fruit so far (blue moon and blue velvet I just added last year; for me at least they seem to take a couple of years to start producing).

Mine get morning shade and afternoon sun.

Nurseries can usually suggest varieties that bloom around the same time as they need cross pollination.

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5 hours ago, Lori D. said:


If you are in CA, then I am a state or two away... 😉 

Glad you are having a great spring too! Isn't it amazing having an actual spring this year, to see plants grow, bloom, fruit, take off! (:D

We are indeed. After so many years of drought, a real rainy season that still hasn't ended (rain in the forecast for this weekend) is amazing. Everything is green.

I did major replantings this fall. Ripping out thirsty lawns and replacing them with meandering gravel paths with mixed beds of mostly drought-tolerant plants. But, as you know, even drought tolerant plants need water to get established. By dumb luck, I picked the right year to re-plant.

Bill

 

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I did major replantings this fall. Ripping out thirsty lawns and replacing them with meandering gravel paths with mixed beds of mostly drought-tolerant plants. But, as you know, even drought tolerant plants need water to get established. By dumb luck, I picked the right year to re-plant...


Yea! I feel like I hit the jackpot, too. I've been digging out the weeds and Bermuda grass in our front and back yards for 5 years, and just this spring *finally* had it cleared enough to actually do some planting -- and everything is doing *great* with this extended cooler/wetter spring! (:D

It's so fun to know I'm "sharing" the same plants (the iceberg roses) with a fellow gardener even if it's long distance. 😉  I have a number of plants that came to me from friends who garden, and there's something so special about the generosity of sharing living plants with a fellow plant lover.

So enjoying this thread!

Edited by Lori D.
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My first successful corn!! Whoop! Already lost a squash and zucchini plant to fungus (oddly not so happy about last several weeks of rain with no sun). Waiting impatiently for tomatoes to ripen for salsa and ketchup. My first ever pumpkins growing (in sling and on trellis)! First watermelon growing (6 so far)! I had to let watermelons jump the beds and sprawl out on lawn. Peanuts going strong too! I eat a hand full of snap peas every day or so. Cherry tomatoes struggling for first time ever. Missing my garden crack. 😉

Anyone know if corn will produce more on same stalk? Or do I pull stalks out and plant more kernels? I would have staggered planting but didn’t have faith it would actually grow.

I love hearing about all the gardens!!

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7 hours ago, Lori D. said:


Yea! I feel like I hit the jackpot, too. I've been digging out the weeds and Bermuda grass in our front and back yards for 5 years, and just this spring *finally* had it cleared enough to actually do some planting -- and everything is doing *great* with this extended cooler/wetter spring! (:D

It's so fun to know I'm "sharing" the same plants (the iceberg roses) with a fellow gardener even if it's long distance. 😉  I have a number of plants that came to me from friends who garden, and there's something so special about the generosity of sharing living plants with a fellow plant lover.

So enjoying this thread!

I finally have a local friend who loves to garden. We've been sharing our gardens with each other this year and I've really enjoyed it!

If anyone would like to share plants, I keep having passion fruit vines pop up. I'd be glad to send the next one to someone for a trade. Just be aware, I planted one vine last year and have had about 10 pop up this year, so it would seem to be a fairly aggressive vine in the right climate!

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1 hour ago, aggie96 said:

My first successful corn!! Whoop! Already lost a squash and zucchini plant to fungus (oddly not so happy about last several weeks of rain with no sun). Waiting impatiently for tomatoes to ripen for salsa and ketchup. My first ever pumpkins growing (in sling and on trellis)! First watermelon growing (6 so far)! I had to let watermelons jump the beds and sprawl out on lawn. Peanuts going strong too! I eat a hand full of snap peas every day or so. Cherry tomatoes struggling for first time ever. Missing my garden crack. 😉

Anyone know if corn will produce more on same stalk? Or do I pull stalks out and plant more kernels? I would have staggered planting but didn’t have faith it would actually grow.

I love hearing about all the gardens!!

C6885D05-B807-481E-A098-EA67376C36A5.jpeg

3A48A53D-61B9-4301-8EAF-9E47D1AC20EA.jpeg

AB74CEE4-884A-4A72-B5F3-59EDDA63D2F8.jpeg

A1A9F570-E5B6-463A-B9CF-CDF5F90691D0.jpeg

5D344607-0373-45E0-A283-77D814B5DFF9.jpeg

Wow beautiful produce!

Corn often (depending on the variety) produces more than one ear on a stalk but all ears are produced/ripen near the same time. If you don't see more ears growing on your stalk now then that stalk is done for the year and you can pull it out, you won't see new ears just getting started on a stalk that has already ripened ears.

Edited by maize
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Each stalk produced two ears, so I’ll pull them out this weekend. Peppers will be happy because the corn was crowding them. I might plant a couple more just for fun and some more corn later this summer. Wish I room for more though! I love garden corn!

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1 hour ago, aggie96 said:

Each stalk produced two ears, so I’ll pull them out this weekend. Peppers will be happy because the corn was crowding them. I might plant a couple more just for fun and some more corn later this summer. Wish I room for more though! I love garden corn!

You want to plant enough at a time that the pollen will fertilize well; corn is wind pollinated and every kernel has to be fertilized individually (that is what all those corn silk strands coming out the top of an ear are for--they catch the pollen, which comes from the tassels at the top of the stalk). Anyway, just a few stalks doesn't always give you enough pollen coverage for full kernelled ears to develop; you'll want to plant a decent sized patch.

Edited by maize
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