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I just don't like the homeschool support group for teens


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There, I said it. I don't mind the support group for the younger ones. In fact I've been involved since the beginning of our homeschool journey and many of my good friends come from that group. But for a long time around here there has been a separate one for teens. And even though I am on my 3rd teen in this group I have never gotten on with others. I find my style of raising teens drastically differs from other moms. I think they are way too controlling and supercilious. The Prom is a big sticking point. The moms totally control it and while they give lip service to the teens that they may plan it, this is blatantly (but not to them) a lie. In fact some of the hypocrisy about this is absolutely laughable. For instance, the moms decided that there had to be planned seating for the prom dinner. But they said the teens could do the planning. My dd and a couple others sat down and planned the tables trying hard to make sure that everybody would feel comfortable. They knew who was shy or who hadn't really been involved with the group and might benefit from a table where kids were more talkative. That sort of thing. Just before the prom the mom who was coordinating it, arbitrarily rearranged the seating!!! As a result, there were kids who didn't know each other sitting at tables while they were separated from their friends across the hall. Lots of awkwardness until right in the middle of everything, the kids started spontaneously ignoring the seating arrangement. At first that one mom tried to stop it and she literally ran around during the prom hissing in the rudest manner at the kids to move their seats back. But it was too much of an en masse movement so she gave up. But REALLY!

 

A couple of the moms are total control freaks who seem to see everything as a power struggle. I swear they encourage impertinence with their own toxic behavior. The chaffing has already started. Apparently some teens started circulating a pamphlet saying that they wanted to form a teen committee to plan the prom. The coordinator nixed this one. How dare students take initiative and want to plan and organize their own event!!!!!

 

Don't even get me started on the modesty thing! I am all for modesty but c'mon! We are all conservative, religious families! It's like they don't trust us parents to make sure our girls are dressed appropriately. Suddenly they become the arbiters of what is appropriate and I as the mother no longer have a say in the matter.

 

I could go on and on.

 

Anyway, it is disheartening to have to deal with such a group. It would so great if there was a healthy group for my teens to belong to so they could relax and form friendships. Each year the tension grows and this group which used to do so much for the teens now only does one or two things.

 

Thanks for letting me vent.

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A couple of the moms are total control freaks who seem to see everything as a power struggle.

 

Well, you've described my problem in general with many homeschool moms.

:leaving:

 

Could you plan some individual events, not a new group or anything but just fun functions like "normal" ;) teens have, and have your teen invite some others casually? That way there won't be a big to-do or power struggle, but you can get back some of the fellowship.

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I totally feel your pain. I too am on my 3rd teen and we are skipping the teen groups. Actually we are skipping homeschool groups all together. I can no longer tolerate the controlling, judgmental, back-stabbing behavior of the other adults and some of the teens.

 

An example: My middle son was dating the daughter of one of these other families. At one point, the other mom decided the kids were getting too close so she put a stop to the relationship. She then proceeded to call the parents of all the other teens and told them to exclude my son from all activities and get-togethers. No longer could he do Odyssey of the Mind, co-op, game night, movie night, etc. All the parents went along with this edict. So I called them all one by one and pleaded my son's case because not only was he losing his girlfriend but his peer group, the excitement of competing and academic support. Not one would go against this other mom. Not one.

 

So son #3 will not be exposed to those types of situations. We find his peers in different places and activities. I am so, so sorry this is something you are dealing with as well. I wish I could give you advice on how to make changes but I was never smart enough to figure them out for myself. :grouphug:

Edited by slr1765
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I totally feel your pain. I too am on my 3rd teen and we are skipping the teen groups. Actually we are skipping homeschool groups all together. I can no longer tolerate the controlling, judgmental, back-stabbing behavior of the other adults and some of the teens.

 

An example: My middle son was dating the daughter of one of these other families. At one point, the other mom decided the kids were getting too close so she put a stop to the relationship. She then proceeded to call the parents of all the other teens and told them to exclude my son from all activities and get-togethers. No longer could he do Odyssey of the Mind, co-op, game night, movie night, etc. All the parents went along with this didactic. So I called them all one by one and pleaded my son's case because not only was he losing his girlfriend but his peer group, the excitement of competing and academic support. Not one would go against this other mom. Not one.

 

So son #3 will not be exposed to those types of situations. We find his peers in different places and activities. I am so, so sorry this is something you are dealing with as well. I wish I could give you advice on how to make changes but I was never smart enough to figure them out for myself. :grouphug:

 

GRRRRRRRR!!!!!!! Your poor son! Our homeschool group did the to my 2 older dd's.....because I did not follow Bill Gothard's teachings....and I allowed my girls to wear jeans and play ball........and swim in a SWIMSUIT!!!! Meanwhile, their kids were sneaking out and changing their clothes iin the car, putting on make-up and sneaking off with older boys....:001_huh: So, my kids found new friends and ended up with college degrees ....these other kids??? ummmmmm....not so good.

 

~~~Faithe (who keeps her kids OUT of crazy teen groups and crazy teen Mom's and focuses on finding activities and friends that are "real."

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I totally feel your pain. I too am on my 3rd teen and we are skipping the teen groups. Actually we are skipping homeschool groups all together. I can no longer tolerate the controlling, judgmental, back-stabbing behavior of the other adults and some of the teens.

 

An example: My middle son was dating the daughter of one of these other families. At one point, the other mom decided the kids were getting too close so she put a stop to the relationship. She then proceeded to call the parents of all the other teens and told them to exclude my son from all activities and get-togethers. No longer could he do Odyssey of the Mind, co-op, game night, movie night, etc. All the parents went along with this didactic. So I called them all one by one and pleaded my son's case because not only was he losing his girlfriend but his peer group, the excitement of competing and academic support. Not one would go against this other mom. Not one.

 

So son #3 will not be exposed to those types of situations. We find his peers in different places and activities. I am so, so sorry this is something you are dealing with as well. I wish I could give you advice on how to make changes but I was never smart enough to figure them out for myself. :grouphug:

 

 

This helps support my hypothesis that many women never truly outgrow the peer pressure discussed in Queen Bees and Wannabes. This woman reminds me of one of the characters in The Help. I think it was Hillie, but am not sure on the name--she was like this mother with her controlling ways & how everyone tended to do what she said.

 

As for me, I struggle to find a balance between giving my teen freedom and not giving her freedome. I think most teens now do have too much of it. However, that's not the same thing as being controlling--that seating issue is horrendous! I'm a big fan of oversight, but not micromanaging.

 

This makes me happier that we haven't joined a teen homeschool group. I didnt because I have seen cliques amonst homeschool teens already.

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I've never read that book Queen Bees and Wannabies. Now I am intrigued.

 

I too think think teens need guidance and oversight. But how can they ever mature if they are never allowed to make mistakes? I'd prefer them to make little, safer mistakes under my wing. So I like the idea of letting them learn by planning their own prom. If they suggest something inappropriate we deal with it then. But 9 times out of 10, I bet they'd have lovely ideas! But these women seem to assume that all teens are shallow and up to no good. We are talking about a group of very sheltered teens. I don't even think these moms know these teens. They just project their own preconceived notions and fears on them. I also think a lot of moms are terrified of their own children's sexuality. They just assume that their kids will have no sense of purity, etc. These moms have put out the rule that there will be no displays of affection at any sponsored event. My dd asked some friends of hers (18 year olds who were dating) to attend a swing dance the group was having. Afterwords, my dd got a call saying that her friends were no longer allowed to attend any of the group's sponsored events. I was aghast! What had her friends done???? Apparently, they were spotted holding hands at some point during the event.

 

Anyway, I am going to wash my hands of the group. It is too aggravating.

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I've never read that book Queen Bees and Wannabies. Now I am intrigued.

 

I too think think teens need guidance and oversight. But how can they ever mature if they are never allowed to make mistakes? I'd prefer them to make little, safer mistakes under my wing. So I like the idea of letting them learn by planning their own prom. If they suggest something inappropriate we deal with it then. But 9 times out of 10, I bet they'd have lovely ideas! But these women seem to assume that all teens are shallow and up to no good. We are talking about a group of very sheltered teens. I don't even think these moms know these teens. They just project their own preconceived notions and fears on them. I also think a lot of moms are terrified of their own children's sexuality. They just assume that their kids will have no sense of purity, etc. These moms have put out the rule that there will be no displays of affection at any sponsored event. My dd asked some friends of hers (18 year olds who were dating) to attend a swing dance the group was having. Afterwords, my dd got a call saying that her friends were no longer allowed to attend any of the group's sponsored events. I was aghast! What had her friends done???? Apparently, they were spotted holding hands at some point during the event.

 

Anyway, I am going to wash my hands of the group. It is too aggravating.

 

:iagree: 100 % about the prom planning (but I'd watch that punch like a hawk to make sure no one spiked it) However, they ought to be able to hold hands at a dance! I am for chaperoning, but not controlling. Lots of kids who make purity vows break them, & I know a homeschooling mother whose dd is expecting a baby later this month, a month or two shy of her 17th birthday. There is more to this, of course, but at one time this girl was sure she'd remain chaste though her teen years.

Edited by Karin
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Well, there is always the danger of raging hormones getting the best of teens. There I think the oversight is in letting them go off to find the opportunity to fool around, which can be tricky. At some point you have to realize that you can't keep other people from sinning. You can create an atmosphere and have an honest, respectful relationship that promotes avoiding such sins. But at some point you have to let go. I think though, often kids do stuff because of 1)rebellion against over controlling moms. I know one young lady that I swear got pregnant to spite her incredibly over the top controlling mom. or 2)forbidden fruit. When grown ups are so repressive and hung up, it makes an already curious teen that much curious-er! 3)not having a strong relationship with a parent so that when things start to go too far they can't run back and seek advice and comfort. They can't confess their own temptations because they are afraid of their parents. My own dd came to me and confessed that she felt things were going too far with her bf but didn't know how to put the brakes on. I was so glad that she came to me before it was too late! We had to have a very nitty gritty talk which took a lot of courage from me (my knees were knocking!) and a lot of energy out of me!!!! I lost some sleep, let me tell you! But I am so glad we did talk and was so grateful to God that she felt confident of my love and would trust me with something so delicate. She broke up with him soon after because she saw that he did not care for her in the right way. Now, she's away at college and could call me today and tell me she blew it! Unfortunately just because you avoid one temptation doesn't mean you won't give in another time. It's a minefield out there! I take comfort in prayer. But I do think that it all ties together and if teens are allowed freedom within limits and are given respect and patience, I think they are less likely to sin. They have more confidence in themselves. They can contemplate their future more clearly. They feel they are worth waiting for and that God will send them someone who truly loves them.

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A couple of the moms are total control freaks who seem to see everything as a power struggle.

 

 

Well, you've described my problem in general with many homeschool moms.

:leaving:

 

 

 

 

Psh, you've described my problem with parents in general. I was definitely the annoying mom who spent time in the classroom and went on field trips, but today's mom plans classroom activites and dictates where to go on field trips. (I will admit that the only elementary teachers I know are at private schools, so it could be specific to private schools?)

 

 

 

 

An example: My middle son was dating the daughter of one of these other families. At one point, the other mom decided the kids were getting too close so she put a stop to the relationship. She then proceeded to call the parents of all the other teens and told them to exclude my son from all activities and get-togethers. No longer could he do Odyssey of the Mind, co-op, game night, movie night, etc. All the parents went along with this didactic. So I called them all one by one and pleaded my son's case because not only was he losing his girlfriend but his peer group, the excitement of competing and academic support. Not one would go against this other mom. Not one.

 

 

 

Disgusting.

 

At least I will never again let the thought that I should try and find a group here flit through my mind. Yes, I know they are not all bad, but we have bad luck. I will let dd stick to the CC clubs, no parents!:tongue_smilie: (although they are always nice enough to invite me to events)

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I have had some problems with our group (dress code) but nothing too bad. I think that is because my older dd is a strong personality who doesn't mind being different. Now what is reall funny is that she is considered to be a good two shoes basically by anyone else who isn't homeschooled. But she is considered 'radical' by many homeschoolers because of things like - she isn't going to Liberty, Patrick Henry or Christendom (for all the Catholics); she listens to many types of music including Lady Gaga; she watches some R rated movies; she isn't a libertarian or even a values only voter; she comes from a family with only three kids; etc, etc. Now, first of all, so many parents who are supposedly strict, have apparantely no clue what their kids are doing on the computer. They don't have tv- no problem- there is hulu, you tube, etc, etc, or maybe they have netflix and the kids learned the password. The only reason she has no issues is that she is a lone drummer and not particularly concerned that she has no close friends. Otherwise, we would have problems. Her younger sister has found some friends whose parents are also less strict.

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A couple of the moms are total control freaks who seem to see everything as a power struggle.

 

 

 

Well, you've described my problem in general with many homeschool moms.

:leaving:

:iagree:

 

This was the last straw for my older son. We felt like we were living in a fishbowl. The gossip and criticism about every little thing was too much. He'd already been wanting to get out of the house and was eager for a challenge, but we joke that the homeschooling moms drove him back to public school. They'd be horrified if they knew ... or actually not -- they'd think it was some moral failing on our part not to keep homeschooling. My son wanted friends whose parents *don't* know, or think they know, every little thing about us. Honestly, complaining about the content of my son's private (or so he thought) Skype conversations? or what time of day he sent them? (when other kids are in bed ...) or telling my kids they need to apologize to their kids??

 

Thanks for letting me vent ...

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We felt like we were living in a fishbowl. The gossip and criticism about every little thing was too much.

 

We just got out of over five years of this kind of environment. Now I have a few select homeschool moms I talk to, homeschool art class, and a field trip group where we are just on an acquaintance level with the other families. Other than that, we do things with non-homeschoolers: Boy Scouts, sports, orchestra, etc. I highly recommend it. :D We just. couldn't. take. the. drama. :glare:

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Now what is reall funny is that she is considered to be a good two shoes basically by anyone else who isn't homeschooled. But she is considered 'radical' by many homeschoolers because of things like - she isn't going to Liberty, Patrick Henry or Christendom (for all the Catholics); she listens to many types of music including Lady Gaga; she watches some R rated movies; she isn't a libertarian or even a values only voter; she comes from a family with only three kids; etc, etc.

 

This sounds like my girls!

 

We haven't had the problems most of you have mentioned (I am *horrified*!!! by what I have been reading!!!), probably because our group has very few teens - certainly not enough for a prom! Most of the families we know stopped homeschooling when their children hit high school....sigh.

 

But one of the moms in our group did mention to me the other day that I should think about my 17yo meshing more with the group, because meshing is important. Um....is she talking about the secular music my daughter listens to, or the fact that my daughter is looking forward to Comic-Con when most of the kids have no interest in scifi/comic books? Maybe my daughter's clothes is too tight - this family has 2 teenaged boys. Or is it that my daughter is too busy with her part-time job to be involved with most of the teen stuff they do plan? Or...???? I just smiled and sort of changed the subject but now I really want to bring it up again :glare:

 

Honestly, I think it is really because my daughter is not close to any of the kids in the group - all her friends are the ones who went back to school and the kids left in the group are all 2-3 years younger! Maybe it would be nice for the other families if my daughter were more of an example or something??!!??

 

Gee. I didn't realize how much this was bothering me!

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I just started a Homeschool Teen Group.

 

It is a social group, and it is run by the teens (my twins and a friend's teen is "running" it). I am just there as a chaperone and to collect emergency forms and the $$ to give to the building owner for the rent. That is it.

 

It is up to the teens on what they are going to do with the group. I will help them if they need help but they are doing it all... planning each meeting, facilitating the meetings, and so on.

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We just got out of over five years of this kind of environment. Now I have a few select homeschool moms I talk to, homeschool art class, and a field trip group where we are just on an acquaintance level with the other families. Other than that, we do things with non-homeschoolers: Boy Scouts, sports, orchestra, etc. I highly recommend it. :D We just. couldn't. take. the. drama. :glare:

 

 

*Nodding head so vigorously it might snap*

 

After leaving a group I had been hip deep in for 7 years and I am still so grateful my dh insisted I walk away that I can't believe he ever had to do so.

 

It seemed like a whole world of positive opportunities and real support and encouragement opened up once I left that toxic association.

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We used to go to a local Homeschool group. My boys did fine with it all, and we had no trouble. But my dd, who loves a challenge, and was a little advanced then, ended up having a problem. She was assigned to a certain class, and was THRILLED with it because it was with her favorite teacher that she'd only had for one class the year before (this was a once a week thing for 4 hours)! 2 weeks into it the "head honcho" lady called me. "We have a big problem" she told me. "Oh dear, what's wrong?" I asked. "Your daughter is in the wrong class and needs to move to a lower one." What? My dd's been so happy in there, AND challenged and meeting all the challenges. The teacher told me she enjoyed having her in there, and that she was doing very well. "I have the sheet that assigned her to that classroom. She's doing very well, and I don't think she'd want to switch classrooms!" "But we can't have this happening. She's too young for that classroom!" No matter what I said, she was adament about talking to dd about switching rooms! I asked her to please not talk with her until I got there. But when I got there, dd was crying and the lady was insisting to her that she must switch rooms/classes! It wouldn't have been a big deal to me which room she was in had they been fairly equal. But the class she wanted to switch her to had kids 2 & 3 years younger, and they catered more to the younger side of that group since there were more of them. It would've bored her to tears! I was upset that she'd felt she could go in and pull dd out of her class and talk to her about it when I had specifially asked her NOT to do that! Class was over a few minutes later and the teacher came out, put her arms around my dd and told the lady she would rather this girl stay in her class than go to the other one. "I think she NEEDS to be in this class this year, and she's keeping up very well with all the assignments and discussions." Needless to say, the other lady was NOT happy. But, this teacher was such a kind and well-respected person, that dd was allowed to stay in that class. She would have been HAPPY to stay in that class the next year too, but when we went to register, this "head honcho" lady INSISTED that she HAD to be in the lower classroom. So, we didn't register, and never went back there. It was too bad, they had some neat programs and classes.

 

I guess I was VERY surprised that, as a homeschool place, they weren't more open to allowing the kids to be in the group they best fit in and worked with. My middle guy is a goofball, and actually gets along better with kids his age or younger. He was in a group with some his age and many younger, and it worked out great for him! He "graduated" (they have a little ceremony at the end of 6th grade) the end of that year, so dd would've been the only one going there.

 

Anyway, it's too bad when people begin micro-managing what once was a great program! Best wishes to you!

Edited by Brindee
Fixed a problem with tenses
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I want to thank you all for sharing your experiences. We're moving soon and I *want* to look into some group activities, but I'm hesitant to look for a homeschool group to join. One of the reasons we homeschool is to avoid the nitpicking, judgment, and micro-managing. Perhaps we will look into individual opportunities instead.

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well, I made it officially one year very active with out group. We came to the conclusion the drama is just too much. I love homeschooling (one year now)

and my kids like it...they came to me and said, park day we like, the other things we don't!

Squeeze the stuffin' out of them, as I was like the Stepford's wife smiling, hating every moment. It works for some, just not us.

We homeschool to have choices, and freedoms.

 

 

I think the first time we met with them, I should have known, apparently it was a 1/2 day in public school and we were not aware, so the PS kids were at the park...and many of the HS group had their kids come and sit by them, or bundled up and left early saying things, like..oh my I didn't realize the PS kids would be here. My kids in their first park day, perceptive to the hilt. Asked me how come they played with them? They had been PS kids a week earlier? lol

:lol:

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We just got out of over five years of this kind of environment. Now I have a few select homeschool moms I talk to, homeschool art class, and a field trip group where we are just on an acquaintance level with the other families. Other than that, we do things with non-homeschoolers: Boy Scouts, sports, orchestra, etc. I highly recommend it. :D We just. couldn't. take. the. drama. :glare:

 

Unfortunately for us it isn't so easy as just leaving an organized group. This is an informal group of friends -- I mean, the *kids* have been fast friends for over five years, the kind of friends I wish I'd had in elem/jr hi ... NICE kids. I think they will be lifelong friends. We moms all get along, for the most part (some personality conflicts); I'm really good friends with several, friendly acquaintances with others. Our lives are also intertwined through some wonderful (and I'm extremely picky!) classes with tutors. So the gossip and drama (I'm trying to be charitable here) isn't the kind of judgmental stuff some of the other posters endured; I think the other moms mean well, they just don't realize they need to back off -- with their own kids and with mine. My son and I just recently became aware of the fishbowl we were living in, and his answer was public school ... Like I said, he'd been thinking about it anyway, so it wasn't really a drastic overreaction :001_smile:

 

Since I'm still in this informal group, I hesitated to post at first, but I don't think they visit these boards often, and also I've been upfront about it with them. I know they don't see it like I do. Anyway, I'll be curious how this all plays out ... where & how these other kids turn out, like another poster mentioned ...

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Well, there is always the danger of raging hormones getting the best of teens. There I think the oversight is in letting them go off to find the opportunity to fool around, which can be tricky. At some point you have to realize that you can't keep other people from sinning. You can create an atmosphere and have an honest, respectful relationship that promotes avoiding such sins. But at some point you have to let go. I think though, often kids do stuff because of 1)rebellion against over controlling moms. I know one young lady that I swear got pregnant to spite her incredibly over the top controlling mom. or 2)forbidden fruit. When grown ups are so repressive and hung up, it makes an already curious teen that much curious-er! 3)not having a strong relationship with a parent so that when things start to go too far they can't run back and seek advice and comfort. They can't confess their own temptations because they are afraid of their parents. My own dd came to me and confessed that she felt things were going too far with her bf but didn't know how to put the brakes on..

:iagree: on much of this. Every situation is different, too, and you have to know yourself & your dc. Open and honest communication are very important. I think that often that is missing. I'm a firm fan of structured parenting of teens--neither authoritarian nor permissive. A good read on teens is Why do They Act that Way? or something very close to that. I don't agree with absolutely everything he suggests, but it is a great eye opener into teen brain structure, thinking patterns & behaviour. I think there is a fine line we often tread.

 

It's true that we can't keep people from sinning, especially since that's such a large category. However, we can work with our dc and teach them. Our society has moved into an extreme position on teen freedom & sex, IMO, and so I teach my dd's since I am NOT with them all of the time.

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My kids were quite involved with our homeschool group when younger, but once they were teens, they seemed to not quite "fit in" as well, and that was fine! It seems it's easier for younger kids of varying backgrounds to be together, but it's a little trickier as they get older. We tended to pull out of the group then as teens, and instead did things with just a few of the teens out of the group who were a good fit with us, or just did things as a family. That worked for us.

 

I wouldn't make too big a deal of it around your child -- that's just the way people are, many variations, some that drive you crazy! Don't always blame others. (Even though it's easier said than done.) Just gently pull out and do your own thing.

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My kids were quite involved with our homeschool group when younger, but once they were teens, they seemed to not quite "fit in" as well, and that was fine! It seems it's easier for younger kids of varying backgrounds to be together, but it's a little trickier as they get older. We tended to pull out of the group then as teens, and instead did things with just a few of the teens out of the group who were a good fit with us, or just did things as a family. That worked for us.

:iagree: That's what we did too. We did stuff with friends we wanted to, and were fine with that! By that time we had made some good friends and kept plenty busy with doing some things with them and doing our own schooling and family things!

 

We never regretted the time we spent there, nor NOT being there any more. It all played out well and kids and moms were happy! :D

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*Nodding head so vigorously it might snap*

 

After leaving a group I had been hip deep in for 7 years and I am still so grateful my dh insisted I walk away that I can't believe he ever had to do so.

 

It seemed like a whole world of positive opportunities and real support and encouragement opened up once I left that toxic association.

 

:D I know!!

 

I told a friend that I actually feel bad about how ridicuously happy I am now. :001_smile: I had no idea what a weight it all was (well, maybe I did and was in denial,) but my dh had a clearer picture, too. I'm ashamed to say that he had to tell me more than once that I needed to get out of there, but I did listen eventually.

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This thread is very timely to us. I was recently told that my dc, especially my oldest, are too intense and need to conform to the other kids. My oldest was described as liking "lofty" conversations. Um, because there really is more to life than video games?! Of course, if you're bottled up all the time and never allowed to have another experience, that's all you have, right?

 

Don't get me wrong, ds likes video games and military play but, also wants to discuss and do other things. He tried discussing military strategy but was met with the glazed-over eye look.

 

Groups are important when you're new to a place or new to homeschooling. It can be hard to meet people otherwise. And I do think kids of all ages need playmates. But they shouldn't have to surpress who they are to be accepted into the group.

 

Like you all, we have a few friends from the group and do outside activities. And really, it's good. That's all we have time for anyway.

 

Denise

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T I was recently told that my dc, especially my oldest, are too intense and need to conform to the other kids. My oldest was described as liking "lofty" conversations.

 

Isn't it amazing what some people will say to your face about your kids? Once while sitting at a picnic table with a couple moms while the kids were at PE, one mom told me that I had a good looking son. :D Then the other mom piped up with "And he knows it too." What?! I guess since my son is quiet and reserved she took that as being stuck up. Whatever. :tongue_smilie:

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I am so sorry to hear how awful homeschool groups have been for you all. I was involved in one for one year and it wasn't a great situation either. I had hoped it was uniquely bad but I suspected it wasn't and this is a pretty strong confirmation.

 

Faithr- I wish there was a good teen homeschool group for you and your kids. I think my daughter would like to be involved with one, at least socially - we are pretty happy with our academic stuff - but even at her age she knows that most of the homeschoolers she knows are just too dogmatic about the minutia to make it any fun.

 

((((HUGS))))))

 

Heather

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There, I said it. I don't mind the support group for the younger ones. In fact I've been involved since the beginning of our homeschool journey and many of my good friends come from that group. But for a long time around here there has been a separate one for teens. And even though I am on my 3rd teen in this group I have never gotten on with others. I find my style of raising teens drastically differs from other moms. Thanks for letting me vent.

 

:iagree:

 

I agree, but for nearly opposite reasons

It can be difficult to find a Match with the teens, eh?

 

Perhaps we should Switch Groups :lol:

 

:seeya:

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