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UPDATE (POST 1).......OMG! Please Tell Me This Is Typical And It Gets Better

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Question:  If DD takes the PSAT in 9th, does that mean it doesn't count and I don't report the scores to anyone?  I don't feel she is ready yet for real, but for practice, it's something I would consider.

 

FWIW, I had mine take it the first time in 8th grade (last year) for a pre-high school baseline (Mine does not mind testing; in fact, anything for a day off of school is the attitude!)  I was really glad that we did, because she found the length to be surprisingly draining.  She'll be taking it again this fall to build up her familiarity and stamina.

 

The scores do not need to be shared.

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Yes, that's it - I don't want to close doors for DD at this young an age.  5 Hours per day is not enough for DD to meet her requirements in what I deem a satisfactory manner - if only for the reason that she has 7 full credits this year (so 7 hours going strictly by the recommended ours for a credit).  Honestly, I don't see camping and co-op (with the exception of my biology class and Shakespeare) as "activities"; I see them as social down time, which all kids need.

 

At any rate, I re-arranged DD's schedule today to eliminate several transition times, discussed with her and "practiced" wiser use of small time increments, and instituted a rule that there is no work after 10:00 pm except reading, drawing, or some such light and ready-for-sleep work.  I am hopeful this will help.

 

 

I think that's another issue of homeschooling vs being in school - when I was in high school, there was no separate social time (I had no time for it!).  School was both academics and social time together.

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Question:  If DD takes the PSAT in 9th, does that mean it doesn't count and I don't report the scores to anyone?  I don't feel she is ready yet for real, but for practice, it's something I would consider.

 

No, it does not count for anything and the scores are not reported.

It only counts in 11th grade.

 

ETA: Have signed up for the PSAT yet? If not, hurry - depending on the school, the deadline may already be past.

Edited by regentrude
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Question:  If DD takes the PSAT in 9th, does that mean it doesn't count and I don't report the scores to anyone?  I don't feel she is ready yet for real, but for practice, it's something I would consider.

 

 

No, it does not count for anything and the scores are not reported.

It only counts in 11th grade.

 

ETA: Have signed up for the PSAT yet? If not, hurry - depending on the school, the deadline may already be past.

 

Yes, do hurry.  The test is on Oct 19th.  That's in 2 weeks and 2 days.  

 

My school is very friendly to homeschoolers and the guidance counselor told me he always orders extra tests for last minute people.  You can ask around and see if your schools are like that.    

 

We are only doing this test for him to be in that roomful of strangers when the test score won't matter at all.  Just to see what it's like out there so there are no surprises when the tests count.  

Edited by Garga
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I guess that what is driving the overload at our house is that dd has 3 subjects she wants to do - English, Creative Writing and Theater Arts. Plus two major electives - drama and horseback riding. Then there are the 4 subjects I'm requiring for college prep purposes - Math, Science, History, Foreign Language. But dd would love to drop history and/or science and focus on her passion subjects. Would that be insane?

Two credits of history and two credits of science are minimum. Maybe do those under dual enrollment to get it done? My kid who loves to plan intend to prep for the SAT history tests in summer and aim for the new August test date. He has no wish to spend two years on history, two summers is fine by him.

 

I took a look at Lynbrook High's 9th grade requirements just to compare and just took the subjects to fit the requirements from your signature. They have 355mins to 380mins of class time per day excluding 15mins recess and 40mins lunch. The school day for them is 7:35am to 2.55/3:05pm. There is still homework. So the day is long even for public school kids.

 

English - English (Lit + Rhetoric)

Math - Algebra 2

Science - Biology (Ecology, Evolution & Natural History)

Social Studies - History (Ancient & Medieval)

LOTE - Spanish 2

PE - horseback riding

2 electives, one must be music or fine arts - Creative Writing, Theater Arts (Greek Drama + Shakespeare)

 

The transcript sample is on slide 7 http://links.schoolloop.com/link/rd?href=736c5f6c696e6b6666303163633065623266687474703a2f2f6c796e62726f6f6b2e7363686f6f6c6c6f6f702e636f6d2f66696c652f313334363932383330363238392f313433393533333039373633362f393138323533333639373130383931373734362e70707378

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Yes, we're going to start test prep in January, but thanks for the encouragement that it's helpful to do so, because, as we've been discussing, it'll make his school day even longer.   :)  We'll probably do test prep on the weekends and take it slowly.  Unless you know of a better way of doing it.  I'm all ears for tips on test prep!  

 

He'll be taking the PSAT in a couple of weeks for the sole purpose of simply being in a classroom with a bunch of strangers.  I don't care if he gets every single question wrong (he's only in 9th).  The only reason he's there is to get used to testing in a scary setting.  

 

We are using the PSAT booklet of tips and a practice test so he knows what to expect.  But really, the whole point of him going to the school and taking the test is just so he can get used the idea of walking into a high school all alone with his yellow no.2 pencils in sweaty hand, and sitting at a desk surrounded by strangers who stare at him and are all taller than him (he's small.)

Eldest will be taking a test later this year for that same reason. We are going to work hard on it so he hopefully does well. By that I mean he doesn't get upset and gets the most important question right, "name _________". I don't care about the subject questions, just making sure he does the test correctly. (Use pencil not pen, .... )

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Eldest will be taking a test later this year for that same reason. We are going to work hard on it so he hopefully does well. By that I mean he doesn't get upset and gets the most important question right, "name _________". I don't care about the subject questions, just making sure he does the test correctly. (Use pencil not pen, .... )

Yes! I don't want him to be so flustered he forgets his address or how to fill in a bubble. The only reason for taking the PSAT in 9th (for us) is so that he sits there, feeling awkward and pressured, and manages to fill in his info correctly.

 

I think he might have to fill in a homeschool code on there somewhere. That will probably be the trickiest part.

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Yes! I don't want him to be so flustered he forgets his address or how to fill in a bubble. The only reason for taking the PSAT in 9th (for us) is so that he sits there, feeling awkward and pressured, and manages to fill in his info correctly.

 

I think he might have to fill in a homeschool code on there somewhere. That will probably be the trickiest part.

PSAT homeschool code varies by state, look at link below. I sticked an address label with address and homeschool code on the back of my kids' calculator when my kids took the ACT and it was okay with the ACT invigilators. Then I realized my kids could copy from the admission ticket for the SAT and ACT. My kids can't remember their long home address well.

http://www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/testright/resources/homeschool_codes.pdf

Edited by Arcadia
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I'm happy with our 7 subjects in 5 hours a day.  We get the coursework done.  We progress.  I feel like we have a good balance of sleep, work and leisure.  She actually probably does a bit more than that because she does some studying on her own just for fun.  I'm not going to ruin that by making that a requirement.  If she needs some extra time at the end to meet some life goals, we will take it.  Even in high school it is a marathon, not a sprint, in my opinion.  But I am still sick 30 years after getting very ill in college.  Ruining my health to be the top of my university class was so not worth it.  (Not saying that this would happen to others - it's just what happened to me and what colors my perspective on how hard to push or not push.) 

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Two credits of history and two credits of science are minimum. Maybe do those under dual enrollment to get it done? My kid who loves to plan intend to prep for the SAT history tests in summer and aim for the new August test date. He has no wish to spend two years on history, two summers is fine by him.

 

I took a look at Lynbrook High's 9th grade requirements just to compare and just took the subjects to fit the requirements from your signature. They have 355mins to 380mins of class time per day excluding 15mins recess and 40mins lunch. The school day for them is 7:35am to 2.55/3:05pm. There is still homework. So the day is long even for public school kids.

 

English - English (Lit + Rhetoric)

Math - Algebra 2

Science - Biology (Ecology, Evolution & Natural History)

Social Studies - History (Ancient & Medieval)

LOTE - Spanish 2

PE - horseback riding

2 electives, one must be music or fine arts - Creative Writing, Theater Arts (Greek Drama + Shakespeare)

 

The transcript sample is on slide 7 http://links.schoolloop.com/link/rd?href=736c5f6c696e6b6666303163633065623266687474703a2f2f6c796e62726f6f6b2e7363686f6f6c6c6f6f702e636f6d2f66696c652f313334363932383330363238392f313433393533333039373633362f393138323533333639373130383931373734362e70707378

 

That was an interesting ppt, thanks for posting.

 

I'm feeling more relaxed about things. We'll do history casually and get as far as we get this year, and plan from there.  DD definitely wants to do Psych as a Social Science credit at some point, so making room for that along with World, American, and Civics/Econ means 4 years of social science. We just will have to pick and choose what we cover and how.  We will probably do biology with lab over 2 years and get as far as we get, credit wise (based on time spent and number of labs completed) and we may break out a piece for a specific .5 credit class - Watershed Science/Forestry, for example.  Then chemistry and/or physics will be done at the cc in 11th/12th.  She gets to do the electives in the subjects she cares about, and we'll make the rest work, using the CC to get some subjects done in one semester.

 

The big things that we have to adjust for right now are health, until we get this current situation figured out/resolved, and extracurriculars - she's in theatrical productions from now till mid-December, and that's a min. of 10 hours per week.  That's easily another class+ worth of work, so what we won't be able to do is 7 hours of classes a day plus 3 hours of rehearsal.  There are some weeks where we'll only do 5 or 6 classes in a day. Or maybe less if the headaches are bad. So that means we may be doing partial days during the summer, or spreading some credits out over 1 1/2 or 2 years. So be it, we'll make it work.

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I was thinking about this thread. Ds did take longer at his work in 9th grade. But he has ADD and dd doesn't. That's made a huge difference in our home. Also, ds was at an honors level in many of his classes and dd isn't. Different strokes for different teens.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Ugh, I think I missed the deadline, as I can't find a link to register anywhere.  We'll just have to take it in 10th after at-home practicing.

No, it does not count for anything and the scores are not reported.

It only counts in 11th grade.

 

ETA: Have signed up for the PSAT yet? If not, hurry - depending on the school, the deadline may already be past.

 

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How do you register for the PSAT?  Do you register through the school or through the College Board?  saw no registration link on the College Board website, but maybe that's because I register through the local high school?

 

 

 

Yes, do hurry.  The test is on Oct 19th.  That's in 2 weeks and 2 days.  

 

 

My school is very friendly to homeschoolers and the guidance counselor told me he always orders extra tests for last minute people.  You can ask around and see if your schools are like that.    

 

We are only doing this test for him to be in that roomful of strangers when the test score won't matter at all.  Just to see what it's like out there so there are no surprises when the tests count.  

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Ugh, I think I missed the deadline, as I can't find a link to register anywhere.  We'll just have to take it in 10th after at-home practicing.

 

You can find locations that offer the exam on the College Board website, but it'll probably be quicker to just call your local high school.  I know that both the local charter school and high school here do order extras for latecomers. Good luck!

Edited by JoJosMom
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Ugh, I think I missed the deadline, as I can't find a link to register anywhere.  We'll just have to take it in 10th after at-home practicing.

 

You cannot register online. You need to make arrangements with your local high school. You might want to call and see if they still take your registration or have extra booklets ordered.

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Cornell?  Wait...I thought that was an elite college.  

 

 

Different levels of elite?  

 

I graduated high school in NY so Cornell was well known.  I currently live in Oregon where I expect most adults have heard of Harvard, but not necessarily of Cornell. 

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Eta: I expect that name recognition over distance would impact the number of people who apply, with relatively fewer people applying to Cornell particularly as distance increases, unless it is for a specific reason like someone they know or a relative went there, or they want a particular program that it offers, or they visited Ithaca and fell in love...something.

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Things also depends on your students strengths.

 

IMO if your student is sleep deprived and stressed out you *have* to cut stuff out. Please teach her to balance her life.

 

I recommend thT you read the Dolphin Way it'll remind you and her about how importance balance is for humans!

 

I would say that your dd needs to decide what to cut and you must absolutely must accept it.

 

Please take this as someone who burned the candles at both ends all during high school and then ended up failing the first semester at college due to total inability to balance a healthy lifestyle.

 

even my own son is doing a LOT of work but we've cut out all the extras *i* was worried about and now it's all just the stuff he really needs. (And he still has about three hours per day minimum of total free time)

 

((Hugs))

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Different levels of elite?

 

I graduated high school in NY so Cornell was well known. I currently live in Oregon where I expect most adults have heard of Harvard, but not necessarily of Cornell.

Cornell is IVy League. Isn't it?

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Eta: I expect that name recognition over distance would impact the number of people who apply, with relatively fewer people applying to Cornell particularly as distance increases, unless it is for a specific reason like someone they know or a relative went there, or they want a particular program that it offers, or they visited Ithaca and fell in love...something.

 

Here is the chart:

http://www.collegefactual.com/colleges/cornell-university/student-life/diversity/chart-geographic-diversity.html

 

Of course many students are from NY. But then, Cornell being one of the Ivies, many students will apply there who apply to all eight of the Ivy League schools.  

Edited by regentrude
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Cornell is IVy League. Isn't it?

 

Yes.

 

And so is UofPenn, which at the distance of Oregon, many people think is the state public school of PA, like Univ. of Oregon is here.

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Cornell has a 14% admissions rate vs Harvard's 5%, so almost three times as much - but with 86% of applicants rejected, it is still a long shot.

 

Requirements are here:

http://admissions.cornell.edu/sites/admissions.cornell.edu/files/2017%20Freshman%20Requirements.pdf

 

 

That's a really useful chart!  OP's dd could look at it and figure out what she needs according to what department she is interested in!

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OP,

 

The sound of the metronome as background noise help my younger boy who is easily distracted work better and faster. I use a metronome app as my hubby's metronome is too loud for background noise.  Weird but it works. 

 

Eta: I expect that name recognition over distance would impact the number of people who apply, with relatively fewer people applying to Cornell particularly as distance increases, unless it is for a specific reason like someone they know or a relative went there, or they want a particular program that it offers, or they visited Ithaca and fell in love...something.

 

 

Cornell is IVy League. Isn't it?

 

All I know about Cornell when I was in high school in the late 80s is the School of Engineering and recently about the 12 year old Texas boy who was accepted.  http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/texas-boy-12-start-studying-cornell-university-article-1.27539

 

ETA:

My kids know they have to do bio, chem and physics anyway so luckily no fuss there with regards to requirements. I can never remember which Us are in Ivy League. Stanford and UCB (both commutable) already have very low acceptance rate.

Edited by Arcadia
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Reefgazer, If you are from Montana or somewhere that had zero people from there go to Cornell, according to the link Regentrude gave, maybe she'd get some extra points for geographic diversity.

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Cornell is IVy League. Isn't it?

 

 

You know that Ivy League is a sports league designation, right?

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Here is the chart:

http://www.collegefactual.com/colleges/cornell-university/student-life/diversity/chart-geographic-diversity.html

 

Of course many students are from NY. But then, Cornell being one of the Ivies, many students will apply there who apply to all eight of the Ivy League schools.  

 

Cornell has a number of "colleges" and for a couple of them they receive some sort of subsidy by NY State for NY residents. So it makes sense that NY residents would be heavily represented at those schools because the cost to attend those is much much less than attending the other Cornell colleges...If I recall correctly.

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Yes.

 

And so is UofPenn, which at the distance of Oregon, many people think is the state public school of PA, like Univ. of Oregon is here.

 Yes, there are "Not Penn State" tshirts sold. Which is so obnoxious, but there you have it.

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originally, yes - but now it stands for more than that.

 

 

Sure, it has some sense of symbolic significance and cachet going beyond the sports designation. But the sports league association is still the "league" that Ivy League refers to. The member schools play against each other and compete for League championships--that is not just something from the past that is no longer true. There are a number of universities/colleges that are probably equally good academically (including UofChicago), or equally whatever else the associations are with the term, that are not in the Ivy League--and certainly a number of places that are academically as good or better than some of the Ivies, especially for some fields.  

 

FWIW I went to 2 Ivy League schools, but think in retrospect that some other choice might have been better for my life over-all, including a balanced life, time for adequate sleep, promotion of lifetime health.  My inclination in this thread therefore is to urge OP to urge her daughter toward a healthful lifestyle.

 

 

 

ETA: even seeing the Cornell requirements, it seems to me that the math level --and maybe some other parts of the 9th grad plan too, now being done goes beyond what is needed for most of the programs there, that she/you could ease up a bit without closing that door...whereas if she gets sick, or hurt due to lack of sleep, that will cause more trouble.

Edited by Pen
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I wonder if Virginia gets us any brownie points?  :)  DD will easily hit the academic and work experience in field requirements/recommendations.

Reefgazer, If you are from Montana or somewhere that had zero people from there go to Cornell, according to the link Regentrude gave, maybe she'd get some extra points for geographic diversity.

 

Edited by reefgazer

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That's true - part of Cornell is a land grant and heavily subsidized by NYS.

Cornell has a number of "colleges" and for a couple of them they receive some sort of subsidy by NY State for NY residents. So it makes sense that NY residents would be heavily represented at those schools because the cost to attend those is much much less than attending the other Cornell colleges...If I recall correctly.

 

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Yes! I don't want him to be so flustered he forgets his address or how to fill in a bubble. The only reason for taking the PSAT in 9th (for us) is so that he sits there, feeling awkward and pressured, and manages to fill in his info correctly.

 

I think he might have to fill in a homeschool code on there somewhere. That will probably be the trickiest part.

I had my daughter take the SAT II French Subject Test at the end of 9th grade for the same reason - bubbling! LOL! 

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Yep, great update, thank you! And I'm glad you are finding that this plan works better.  How great is it to be able to process with this group?

 

FWIW, I've cut back on the number of science labs I had planned and we're keeping history to the minimum, and we'll just get how far we get. OTOH, the other subjects keep expanding, but that means that things get pushed forward in time, not just added on! We continue to get less done each week than in my hopeful plan, but the work is all good, great discussions, great writing, and I feel like what we spend time on is getting more rewarding and meaningful. This on top of 10+ hours a week of theater rehearsal, so I really have nothing to complain about!

 

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I did not realize this thread was several pages long until after I posted. I apologize for my post not relating to the recent conversations. Below is what I typed when I "thought" I was at the bottom of the post. I look forward to reading the other thoughts in this post that I obviously missed.

 

We also struggle with school work not taking over life. It has been helpful to me to look at online schedules posted by other homeschool parents whose children are in high school level courses. Also, just making a time grid, and realistically planning time for each subject was a major reality check for me. I realized that state graduation requirements, my requirements, plus all the practice hours for 3 musical instruments did not fit into a day.  So, we had to make some adjustments. Also, I make sure my students understand that high school requires work and reading outside of class time. Other people read and study at night, so it can work for homeschooled students too. Besides, college will require outside of class work.

 

I require that unfinished work be caught up on weekends. Lately, I have had to tell my daughter, if you cannot stay on track to allow time for a specific elective (that she really needs for personal improvement...) - we can just do it in the summer. She wants her summer break, so she is trying to be more mindful of time. 

 

High school has been a big leap in the amount of content; but I am still trying to guide and pray for the necessary leap in self discipline/maturity that is necessary to get it all done. Time management during transitions is our main challenge now.

Edited by Pistachio mom
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