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tuesdayschild

Middle Ages for highschool. Suggestions?

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Wondering if anyone could please help me.

I'd really appreciate some suggestions for the Middle Ages to consider for ds 14+ (spines, guides, literature, favourite documentaries, lecture styled courses, etc....) .

 

ETA: Rigorous and lighter options both welcomed.    :)

 

 

 

 

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Here's a link to lit we read:  http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/474850-wwyd-finishing-10th-medieval-historylit-and-starting-11th-age-of-discover-histlit/?p=4993096  We also used all three sets of Professor Daileader's lectures from TTC, which were excellent.  SWB's History of the Medieval World is very good, but it only goes up through the first crusade.  In addition, or instead, you might want to use the related part of Spielvogel's Western Civilization. 

 

 

 

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This is what DD did for Middle ages:

Textbook: Short History of Western Civilizations by John Harrison- Ch. 14-25

 

Major works of Literature studied:

Beowulf

Chaucer Canterbury Tales

Song of Roland

Nibelungenlied

Dante Inferno

 

Supplementary reading:

Umberto Eco The Name of the Rose

The Monster and the critics (JRR Tolkien)

 

Audio lectures by the Teaching Company:

Each college level lecture is 30 minutes in length.

The Early Middle Ages (24 lectures, Prof. Philip Daileader )

The High Middle Ages (24 lectures, Prof. Philip Daileader)

The Late Middle Ages (24 lectures, Prof. Philip Daileader)

Dante’s Divine Comedy (Lectures 1-15, Profs. William Cook and Ronald Herzman)

 

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My dd hasn't reached the Middle Ages yet (next year) but we have and plan to use these lectures too.

 

Audio lectures by the Teaching Company:

Each college level lecture is 30 minutes in length.

The Early Middle Ages (24 lectures, Prof. Philip Daileader )

The High Middle Ages (24 lectures, Prof. Philip Daileader)

The Late Middle Ages (24 lectures, Prof. Philip Daileader)

Dante’s Divine Comedy (Lectures 1-15, Profs. William Cook and Ronald Herzman)

 

 

We'll be using the majority of the books under Year Ten on my blog A Mind in the Light, if you'd like to see the book list.

 

 

Sorry, I was trying to quote part of Regentrude's post, but I've clipped too much off.

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Thanks!

I appreciate the lists (& link).

Off to do some title and lecture researching,  and blog visiting.

 

Anyone else care to share what they did?

Does no one use a set curriculum, or guides for highschool history ... or do most create their own customised line up for M/As?

I have no qualms with doing the later ... but if we could find a pre-set something that fits. 

 

(We're non U.S based, so we do not need to educate towards creating a U.S highschool transcript.)

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Lots of great suggestions in these past threads:

Teaching Company lectures on Medieval times -- which to choose?

Medieval Epic Literature and adding some history

Favorite Literature Choices for Middle Ages

What to use when studying Renaissance/Medieval for lit/worldview?

Fiction to go with Medieval History

Netflix movies to go with Medieval/Renaissance?

 

For packaged programs:

Veritas: Omnibus II (Christian; literature & history -- 1 year)

Tapestry of Grace year 2 (Christian; literature, history, writing -- 1 year)

Trisms (history, literature, 1 year)

Biblioplan year 2 (Christian; literature, history -- 1 year)

Kolbe Academy Home School: Literature of Christendom (Christian; literature; 1 year)

Lightning Literature: British Medieval (1 semester; literature)

 

Guides:

SMARR: Medieval lit. guides

The Great Books -- Christian; guided worldview discussion, NOT straight-up lit. guides

 

Spine:

History of the Medieval World (Bauer)

 

Booklist/Schedule:

Ambleside Online: Year 8 (history, literature; 1 year)

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Thanks Lori, your link list will be helpful.

Much appreciated!!

 

(That will keep me out of mischief for a while :) )

 

ETA: Between the items/books the other moms have listed, or linked to,  and your list Lori;  I've found exactly what we're looking for.

:hurray:

 

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Biblioplan -- includes the spine, many book suggestions w/suggested guides, weekly discussion questions, map work, tests, etc.  You can follow as written or add/subtract.  Very flexible.

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I recently scored a copy of The Portable Renaissance Reader  http://www.amazon.com/Portable-Renaissance-Reader-James-Bruce/dp/0140150617 which looks great!

 

 

We have this too and really loved it. My older dd used this along with Renaissance and Reformation Times by Dorothy Mills. I even made a guide for this book and included many selections from the Portable Renaissance Reader. You can find the guide for the book by Mills under its title under Book Notes on my blog linked below, A Mind in the Light, if you are interested in printing the guide.

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We use Spielvogel's _World History: The Human Odyssey_ as spine and supplement.

i'd love to see inside that!

So I could compare how different it is to the Glencoe -World History bk ds has been doing the ancients portion during 2013.

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Biblioplan -- includes the spine, many book suggestions w/suggested guides, weekly discussion questions, map work, tests, etc.  You can follow as written or add/subtract.  Very flexible.

We're using the Ancients Companion Text, and mapping world this year.

 

Have you used the M/As family guide (is that it's name?) with your dc?  (ignore my question as required :) )

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We've used BF's Medieval/Ref/Ren with several kids.

 

Along the same lines (as far as old-time homeschool options-to-the-textbook), I think you can still get Konos History of the World?  I know they have an active yahoo group (mostly for youngers) but I'm not pulling up their website... okay, the yahoo group says it's here and that works: 

 

Beautiful Feet would be more for kids who are able to pick up historical info by reading novels set in the day, and Konos for kids who pick up historical info by including more hands-on, art, etc.

 

I did want to mention that "middle ages" is pretty narrow for a high school course, and both of these cover more than just that (as do most high school programs).

 

Julie

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i'd love to see inside that!

So I could compare how different it is to the Glencoe -World History bk ds has been doing the ancients portion during 2013.

I've never seen the Glencoe book. I selected this particular book because it's a high school text, and I understood the Glencoe was for middlers. I could be wrong. Anyho...Here's the TOC.

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I've never seen the Glencoe book.  I selected this particular book because it's a high school text, and I understood the Glencoe was for middlers.  I could be wrong.  Anyho...Here's the TOC.

 

World History The Human Odyssey

By Jackson Spielvogel

 

Contents-in-Brief

 

I appreciate you posting all that!  Thank you.

ETA: I never expected you to do that. That's very kind of you.

 

You're exactly right Glencoe is listed for middles - or as one friend is doing, using it as a fast 'review/catch- up' for her highschooler.

With our academic focus *needing* to be elsewhere Ds used the ancients as a lite option for this year.  Worked perfectly for us. ommv

 dd (12) will be using the M/A + portion in 2014

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Along the same lines (as far as old-time homeschool options-to-the-textbook), I think you can still get Konos History of the World?  I know they have an active yahoo group (mostly for youngers) but I'm not pulling up their website... okay, the yahoo group says it's here and that works: 

 

Beautiful Feet would be more for kids who are able to pick up historical info by reading novels set in the day, and Konos for kids who pick up historical info by including more hands-on, art, etc.

 

I did want to mention that "middle ages" is pretty narrow for a high school course, and both of these cover more than just that (as do most high school programs).

 

Julie

We're aiming to study from early church history up to, and including, the ren/ref era.

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We use Spielvogel's _World History: The Human Odyssey_ as spine and supplement.

 

 

i'd love to see inside that!

 

 

We used Spielvogel's Human Odyssey in high school as a spine for 2 years:

- first 200 pages for our ancients year

- last 450 pages for our modern history

 

I's pretty textbook-y in writing style. We used a lot of supplements and excerpts of other resources along with it, which accentuated the dry textbook writing.

 

It was fine for the ancients year. But we became increasingly not thrilled with it; our second year we jumped ahead and did modern history, and the author's distain for the church became evident through the slightly negative or superior tone whenever the church was mentioned. Also the author's slightly leftist/socialist leanings became clear when we hit the mid 20th century, and the horror of the Holocaust and the Stalin's slaughter of his own people were pretty much downplayed...

 

We used Notgrass' Exploring America (evangelical christian perspective) for American History for our 3rd year. For our 4th year, because the middle ages of Europe involves so much church history, we dropped Human Odyssey in favor of a straight-up church history text.

 

I really wanted to like Spielvogel -- it covers most of history (up through 1999) in one volume that is not overly large (1150 pages); the text on the page is relieved by some illustrations and side bars but not so many as to be distracting; and I esp. liked the inclusion of excerpts from authors and writings from the time period being studied in each chapter. But, ultimately the dry writing and tone of author cause me to always give a mixed review.

 

You might check your local library to see if they have a copy you can look at... Best of luck, whatever you decide to go with! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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We used Spielvogel's Human Odyssey in high school as a spine for 2 years:

- first 200 pages for our ancients year

- last 450 pages for our modern history

 

I's pretty textbook-y in writing style. We used a lot of supplements and excerpts of other resources along with it, which accentuated the dry textbook writing.

 

It was fine for the ancients year. But we became increasingly not thrilled with it; our second year we jumped ahead and did modern history, and the author's distain for the church became evident through the slightly negative or superior tone whenever the church was mentioned. Also the author's slightly leftist/socialist leanings became clear when we hit the mid 20th century, and the horror of the Holocaust and the Stalin's slaughter of his own people were pretty much downplayed...

 

We used Notgrass' Exploring America (evangelical christian perspective) for American History for our 3rd year. For our 4th year, because the middle ages of Europe involves so much church history, we dropped Human Odyssey in favor of a straight-up church history text.

 

I really wanted to like Spielvogel -- it covers most of history (up through 1999) in one volume that is not overly large (1150 pages); the text on the page is relieved by some illustrations and side bars but not so many as to be distracting; and I esp. liked the inclusion of excerpts from authors and writings from the time period being studied in each chapter. But, ultimately the dry writing and tone of author cause me to always give a mixed review.

 

You might check your local library to see if they have a copy you can look at... Best of luck, whatever you decide to go with! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

Thanks for the review. That helps.

 

We live in NZ so I often have to buy things sight unseen, or off a tiny online sample - not complaining :) that's just how it is.

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Just wanted to add that I'm currently reading The Year 1000,by Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger. It's quite an interesting look at medieval England and busts several common misconceptions of that time and place.

HTH

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We are using The Humanistic Tradition, which I really like and *never* see mentioned! There are 6 volumes total, starting with ancient history. We are using volumes 2 & 3 for sophomore year. Older editions can be found for about $10 shipped at alibris (amazon is usually much higher for some reason).

 

HT is our spine. I like that it includes not only the historical events, but literature excerpts and photographs of famous art works. The accompanying cds, roughly same price, have music selections (Gregorian chants, Beethoven, etc).

 

I love how open-and-go it is. If we want to do just the basics for a certain time/place, or if planning goes horribly awry, lol, we CAN just use the book. If we want to supplement, we certainly can, and it's easy enough to skip the excerpt when we plan to read the whole work. (Sometimes we substitute a different excerpt, simply b/c I have lots of lit books that come complete with questions, assignments, and discussion points; HT does not have this in the book itself, but there are some online helps http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072317302/)

 

For our master schedule, I just flipped through the book and allocated so many days per chapter (it's really easy to see what topics are covered and what excerpts are included). Some chapters get much more time than others. I don't need to have the whole year planned out per se, I just need to where my emphasis is going to be (for example, we will spend a lot of time on Dante and Shakespeare, their works and the context of history; these periods got their time 'first'). I googled a few lesson plans just to get an idea of what might be reasonable time-wise.

 

Edited to add link to book (this is newer edition):

http://www.amazon.com/Humanistic-Tradition-II-Modern-Present/dp/0077346238/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1379892497&sr=1-1&keywords=the+humanistic+tradition+volume+2

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We are using The Humanistic Tradition, which I really like and *never* see mentioned! There are 6 volumes total, starting with ancient history. We are using volumes 2 & 3 for sophomore year. Older editions can be found for about $10 shipped at alibris (amazon is usually much higher for some reason).

 

 

Edited to add link to book (this is newer edition):

http://www.amazon.com/Humanistic-Tradition-II-Modern-Present/dp/0077346238/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1379892497&sr=1-1&keywords=the+humanistic+tradition+volume+2

 

Could you tell me if this linked sample is similar to The HT text you are using?

The art work pictures included are stunning!

 

(Samples of HT pretty have been rather challenging for me to find :D )

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Could you tell me if this linked sample is similar to The HT text you are using?

The art work pictures included are stunning!

 

(Samples of HT pretty have been rather challenging for me to find :D )

Yes! That is 5th edition; I have some 3rd and some 4th, and there is no great apparent difference. The artwork examples are excellent, and I have also been pleased with the audio CDs.

 

From what I have seen, the particular edition doesn't make a big difference. I would say to make sure and get the single books rather than the multi volume (ie, books 1, 2, & 3 in a single text), simply b/c the multi volume is rather heavy and awkward. There are 6 books total.

 

I have all of the books, so lmk if I can give you any more specifics.

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Biblioplan -- includes the spine, many book suggestions w/suggested guides, weekly discussion questions, map work, tests, etc.  You can follow as written or add/subtract.  Very flexible.

 

One of my dc is using Biblioplan year 2, with the companion, cool history, maps, & tests.  I assign literature selections also, based on Biblioplan's recommendations.  It's working well for my dd.

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Even as an adult, I'm learning from Our Island Story. I have a Yesterday's Classics version from the $50.00 eBook package sale, and the audio from Alcazar Audio that I purchased on sale at Currclick. And I'm reading Nesbit's Shakespeare, also the YC and Alcazar Audio versions. I'm not sure when the next sales are. AO years 1 and 2 are medieval, as well as years 7 and 8. Don't be afraid to use some of the year 1 and 2 suggestions for a little lighter reading. You can read these books for free online here.

http://www.mainlesson.com/main/displayarticle.php?article=year1

 

http://www.amblesideonline.org/curriculum.shtml

 

Heritage History has some great stuff too. You can buy CDs or read online.

http://www.heritage-history.com/www/heritage.php?Dir=books

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With my 16 & 14 yo boys, I used the following:

 

History Odyssey, Level 3: used as spine for world coverage, including the Americas. Also includes essay prompts, mapping, people/religion/gov't

SWB History of the Middle Ages (I read this title)

Truthquest guides: A bit too wordy for me, but useful info.

Ambleside Online: Love this, but it's only from British perspective. Chose titles I simply couldn't resist =)

Rose Publishing: Christian History Made Easy

 

YouTube and NetFlix as needed.

 

HTH,

Teresa

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One of my dc is using Biblioplan year 2, with the companion, cool history, maps, & tests.  I assign literature selections also, based on Biblioplan's recommendations.  It's working well for my dd.

I have Biblioplan 2 lined up for my dd ... and just can't seem to settle on it for ds

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Is New Zealand being offered the Kindle and audio whispersync discount.

http://www.amazon.com/The-History-Medieval-World-ebook/dp/B003JE1GSE/ref=tmm_kin_title_0

 

We can get the Kindle version of History of the Medieval World for $17.99 and then the audio is just $5.49.

 

ETA: We don't :(

The audio portion of that book, via audible, is currently not available in NZ - purchasing for me to preview would have been a perfect option!

 

Even as an adult, I'm learning from Our Island Story. I have a Yesterday's Classics version from the $50.00 eBook package sale, and the audio from Alcazar Audio that I purchased on sale at Currclick. And I'm reading Nesbit's Shakespeare, also the YC and Alcazar Audio versions. I'm not sure when the next sales are. AO years 1 and 2 are medieval, as well as years 7 and 8. Don't be afraid to use some of the year 1 and 2 suggestions for a little lighter reading. You can read these books for free online here.

http://www.mainlesson.com/main/displayarticle.php?article=year1

 

http://www.amblesideonline.org/curriculum.shtml

 

Heritage History has some great stuff too. You can buy CDs or read online.

http://www.heritage-history.com/www/heritage.php?Dir=books

I have Our Island Story lined up to use as we have it ...

Appreciate your other suggestions too!! 

Never heard of heritage history .....off to link hop some more.   :thumbup1:

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Just adding a note of thanks here to all who've posted:

I really do appreciate the help and idea sharing - it's helped/helping me to think way outside the box of options I thought I had.

 

Thank you!

 

ETA: I have until Dec 2013 to finalise my options .. so if anyone else wants to add to this stock pile of ideas, go for it :)

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For anyone who has used the Daileader lectures on the Middle Ages, is there any advantage of the DVD over the CD? (in other words, are there enough visuals to make it worth it to pay extra for the DVD over the CD?) Tell me what my mileage will be! Also, I'm thinking of using this with an advanced 12-year-old -- is there anything inappropriate of off-putting for a kid of that age? (I'm looking at the first lecture, early middle ages)

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You know, in this case, I think you are fine with the cd.  I usually like dvds, but I didn't like these as much for a totally superficial reason: The presenter is funny-looking.  (ducking tomatoes).  I know it's a bad reason, but I found him distracting!  I don't recall there being any visuals that you would miss out on. It's been a couple of years since I watched them, but his face stands out in my mind, not in a good way!

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Should someone else find this thread in a search, sometime, I thought I'd share what we've ended up selecting to use with our M.A's study this year:

 

A ceiling on our home educating funds did help to dictate some of what we've chosen as postage costs can get ghastly

 (still hankering, a little, after those beautifully illustrated HT texts though...)

 

Once again, thanks for the very generous help offered here - I've been back to this thread often ;)

 

For those that are blog phobic/resistant, just ignore my link

 

http://www.last-in-line.info/2014/02/middle-ages-schedule-2014.html

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