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Book a Week in 2012 - week 31


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Good Morning, my lovelies! Today is the start of week 31 in our quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Welcome back to all our readers, welcome to all those just joining in and to all who are following our progress. Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog to link to your reviews.

 

52 Books Blog - Don Quixote: Highlighted the first chapter of Miguel de Cervantes story of Don Quixote. The story wasn't what I expected at all and it was humorous and silly and intriguing.

 

Book News:

 

 

 

 

What are you reading this week?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to week 30

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I finished The Great Gatsby on Friday--I haven't read it since high school, lo these many many years ago. I really enjoyed it! I had forgotten almost everything. Fitzgerald's writing is wonderful.

 

Last night I set off on a long walk and tried to listen to the audio book of Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury, but discovered that it was actually a dramatization! Aaaaaaaaahhhhhh! Not what I wanted.

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Working on Soulless by Gail Carriger. I got sidetracked on it last week because my dd snagged the book from me when she saw what I was reading.

 

I really, really need to get started on my book club book this week (because our meeting is next week)! Yikes. Maybe after I finish Soulless.

 

Let's just say that tv hasn't ever been the same since the '70s. I'm so excited that Quincy, M.D. is on Netflix now. If only they would show Emergency! - Randolph Mantooth, where art thou? - and I dream of The Man From Atlantis and The Six Million Dollar Man (even if he stole my name). Meanwhile, I watch and re-watch Columbo.

:lol: Ok, girl, I think your definition of 'junky' tv viewing is not so bad! I mean, I was thinking you were going to say you watch Cops or stuff like that... ;):tongue_smilie::lol:

--------------------------

My Goodreads Page

Completed the Europa Challenge Cappuccino Level (at least 6 Europa books: #s 4, 9, 10, 11, 14, 19, & 21 on my list).

Completed Robin's Read a Russian Author in April Challenge (#24 & #26 on my list).

 

My rating system: 5 = Love; 4 = Pretty awesome; 3 = Decently good; 2 = Ok; 1 = Don't bother (I shouldn't have any 1s on my list as I would ditch them before finishing)...

 

2012 Books Read:

Books I read January-June 2012

37. Clutter Busting Your Life by Brooks Palmer (3 stars)

38. The Cat's Table by Michael Ondaatje (5 stars)

39. The Colors of Infamy by Albert Cossery (3 stars)

40. Osa and Martin: For the Love of Adventure by Kelly Enright (3 stars)

 

41. Hexed by Kevin Hearne (4 stars)

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I finished The Great Gatsby on Friday--I haven't read it since high school, lo these many many years ago. I really enjoyed it! I had forgotten almost everything. Fitzgerald's writing is wonderful.

 

 

It's much better, isn't it, when you've lived long enough to encounter real people who go through life blithely destroying other people's lives.

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:lol: Ok, girl, I think your definition of 'junky' tv viewing is not so bad! I mean, I was thinking you were going to say you watch Cops or stuff like that... ;):tongue_smilie::

 

i admit to a horrified fascination with Hoarders, but who doesn't?

 

Oh, books, that's right. Still on Augustine, and doing a quick re-reading of Macbeth, as I'm supposed to be teaching it.

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I finished a bunch this week, a couple of them just quick graphic novels.

 

56 and 57) Aya of Yop City and Aya: The Secrets Come Out by Marguerite Abouet

 

58.) Teach Me to Say It Right by Dorothy P. Dougherty - This book did not offer activities to do with your child if he has articulation problems, like the title suggests. It offers activities to do with your child if you're concerned because he's a little behind where his siblings were at that age, or something like that. Coming from a linguistics background I agree with some of the things in the book, but disagree with others. Though there was a list of sources in the back of the book, nothing was cited within the text, so it would be difficult to check the source and reasoning of any particular stated "fact." That said, I did photocopy a couple pages of things I might do with my youngest.

 

59.) Life on Mars by Tracy K. Smith - A Pulitzer Prize winning book of poetry. Many poems allude to or are in some way related to science and/or science fiction.

 

60.) A Little Treasury of Haiku - Just a collection of poems written by the masters Basho, Buson, Issa and a few others. This is just something I pulled off the shelf at the library. Reading a few haiku was a nice way to start the day.

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Just finished Uncharted Territory by Connie Willis. I've loved almost everything I've ever read by her, this not so much.

 

Currently reading The Lost History of Christianity by Philip Jenkins. It is about the extent of the church in the East in the first millenium after Christ, how prolific it was, and how it came to die. Even more, it is about how religion is always in flux.

Edited by Onceuponatime
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i admit to a horrified fascination with Hoarders, but who doesn't?

Oh, that reminds me... I'm also working on another book: The Hoarder in You by Dr. Robin Zasio. (She's one of the therapists on Hoarders.)

 

I've watched Hoarders some & then heard about her book, so I'm kind of curious about it. I definitely have some hoarders in the family tree & so I have a somewhat vested interest in knowing/learning about it (esp. because I don't want to end up becoming a hoarder myself). I figure information is knowledge in this case.

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Completed:

Book #43 - "The Pilgrim's Progress" by John Bunyan.

 

 

Book #42 - "The School for the Insanely Gifted" by Dan Elish.

Book #41 - "The Eye of the Sun - Part One of Blackwood: Legends of the Forest" by Les Moyes.

Book #40 - "The Fallacy Detective" by Nathaniel Bluedorn and Hans Bluedorn.

Book #39 - "Don Quixote" by Miguel de Cervantes. Translated by John Ormsby.

Book #38 - "Organizing Solutions for People with Attention Deficit Disorder" by Susan C. Pinsky.

Book #37 - "Growing Up: A Classic American Childhood" by Marilyn vos Savant.

Book #36 -"A Young People's History of the United States" by Howard Zinn.

Book #35 - "Organizing the Disorganized Child: Simple Strategies to Succeed in School" by Martin L. Kutscher & Marcella Moran.

Book #34 - "Turn Right at Machu Picchu" by Mark Adams.

Book #33 - "The Lightening Thief" by Rick Riordan.

Book #32 - "Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, And the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero" by Michael Hingson.

Book #31 - "America's Hidden History" by Kenneth C. Davis.

Book #30 - "The Diamond of Darkhold†by Jeanne DuPrau.

Book #29 - "The People of Sparks†by Jeanne DuPrau.

Book #28 - "Mockingjay" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #27 - "Well-Educated Mind" by Susan Wise Bauer.

Book #26 - "The Prophet of Yonwood" by Jeanne Duprau.

Book #25 - "City of Ember" by Jeanne Duprau.

Book #24 - "The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch.

Book #23 - "Who Moved My Cheese" by Spencer Johnson.

Book #22 - "Deconstructing Penguins" by Lawrence and Nancy Goldstone.

Book #21 - "Stargirl" by Jerry Spinelli.

Book #20 - "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #19 - "Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins.

Book #18 - "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Safran Foer.

Book #17 - "Frozen Assets: Cook for a Day, Eat for a Month" by Deborah Taylor-Hough.

Book #16 - "Miserly Moms: Living Well on Less in a Tough Economy" by Jonni McCoy.

Book #15 - "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D.

Book #14 - "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking" by Susan Cain.

Book #13 - "Chasing Vermeer" by Blue Balliett.

Book #12 - "The Highly Sensitive Person" by Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D.

Book #11 - "Extraordinary, Ordinary People" by Condoleezza Rice.

Book #10 - "The Pig in the Pantry" by Rose Godfrey.

Book #9 - "The Virgin in the Ice" by Ellis Peters.

Book #8 - "The Leper of St. Giles" by Ellis Peters.

Book #7 - "St. Peter's Fair" by Ellis Peters.

Book #6 - "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" by Amy Chua.

Book #5 - "Monk's Hood" by Ellis Peters.

Book #4 - "Flash and Bones" by Kathy Reichs.

Book #3 - "Spider Bones" by Kathy Reichs.

Book #2 - "One Corpse Too Many" by Ellis Peters.

Book #1 - "A Morbid Taste for Bones" by Ellis Peters

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#79 Get Out of My Life, But First Could You Drive Me and Cheryl to the Mall? (Anthony E. Wolf, Ph.D.; non-fiction)

Read this one as "research" for a piece I'm working on. I'm never smug about my parenting lot -- I *know* I won the lottery. This book frightened me.

 

 

 

Why? I haven't read the book so I'm wondering.

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This week I finished:

 

#40 - A Glass of Blessings, by Barbara Pym. This was my introduction to this author, recommended on these threads. While I enjoyed the writing and the overall story was alright, it seemed to move a little slow.

 

Currently reading:

 

#41 - The Amateur, by Edward Klein. Political; therefore, no posted comments. :)

 

Waiting in the wings is:

 

#42 - The Amateur Marriage, by Anne Tyler.

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Book #9 - "The Virgin in the Ice" by Ellis Peters.

Book #8 - "The Leper of St. Giles" by Ellis Peters.

Book #7 - "St. Peter's Fair" by Ellis Peters.

Book #5 - "Monk's Hood" by Ellis Peters.

Book #2 - "One Corpse Too Many" by Ellis Peters.

Book #1 - "A Morbid Taste for Bones" by Ellis Peters[/size]

 

Maus - All of a sudden, these books just *popped out* at me from your enviably long list of completed reading! Dh really likes the Brother Cadfael programs. I think there were originally thirteen episodes, all of which he watched. I recently watched "The Virgin in the Ice" and was surprised at how much I liked the program, since I generally find it hard to get involved in stories set that far back in history. Since you have read six of the books, you must enjoy them! Do you advise reading them in any particular order? Our library has eight of Ellis' books.

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I am reading very little right now. And what I am reading, are all long books that I am about 1/3 through. :)

 

The Log Cabin Lady--a really nice anonymous memoir that was sort of a pamphlet, about the transition from a rough frontier life to high society. She had a hard time.

 

The Magic Half--Annie Barrows' new book, about a girl who travels back in time to 1935. Very nice!

 

I'm going on a road trip in which I may not do the driving, so maybe I can get some reading done...ha ha fat chance. :)

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I finished The Power of Habit and the third Jane Austen mystery this week, just before they were due back at the library.

 

The Power of Habit was interesting and easy to read for a non-fiction book. Lots of interesting anecdotes. I think it definitely has some application to homeschooling. Since reading the book, I've been thinking about how I want to work with my 7th grader on math this year to instill good habits that will serve her well in high school and college courses. I'm going to work with her to develop the habits I want her to have, like copying down the examples her teacher works out instead of just watching. Interesting examples in the sports world too that apply to my other dd. Good stuff. And I'm enjoying the Jane Austen mysteries too. Number 4 is waiting for me at the library, and other than that I will have nothing else in progress. Lots of other things to do.

 

Books Read in 2012 (* = contenders for my 2012 Top Ten)

48. Jane and the Wandering Eye-Stephanie Barron

47. The Power of Habit-Charles Duhigg*

46. Anna Karenina-Leo Tolstoy*

45. Jane and the Man of the Cloth-Stephanie Barron

44. The House of the Seven Gables-Nathaniel Hawthorne

43. Mockingjay-Suzanne Collins

42. The Vitamin D Solution-Michael F. Holick

41. Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor-Stephanie Barron

40. Suspense and Sensibility-Carrie Bebris

39. Catching Fire-Suzanne Collins

38. Pride and Prescience-Carrie Bebris

37. The Night Circus-Erin Morgenstern*

36. Houskeeping-Marilynne Robinson

35. Death Comes to Pemberley-P.D. James

34. The Language of Flowers-Vanessa Diffenbaugh*

33. The Peach Keeper-Sarah Addison Allen

32. 11/22/63-Stephen King*

31. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer-Mark Twain

30. Quiet-Susan Cain*

29. The Paris Wife-Paula McLain

28. The Girl Who Chased the Moon-Sarah Addison Allen

27. The Feast Nearby-Robin Mather

26. The Sugar Queen-Sarah Addison Allen

25. The Invention of Hugo Cabret-Brian Selznick

24. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks-Rebecca Skloot*

23. The Hunger Games-Suzanne Collins

22. Not a Fan-Kyle Idleman

21. Wildwood-Colin Meloy

20. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children-Ransom Riggs

19. The Mysterious Affair at Styles-Agatha Christie

18. A String in the Harp-Nancy Bond

17. The Art of Hearing Heartbeats-Jan-Philipp Sendker*

16. The Lacuna-Barbara Kingsolver*

15. I Am Half-Sick of Shadows-Alan Bradley

14. Garden Spells-Sarah Addison Allen

13. The Prince and the Pauper-Mark Twain

12. Romeo and Juliet-William Shakespeare

11. The Shallows-Nicholas Carr

10. The Handmaid’s Tale-Margaret Atwood

9. Mudbound-Hillary Jordan*

8. The Other Wind-Ursula Le Guin

7. What the Dog Saw-Malcolm Gladwell

6. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall-Anne Bronte

5. Tehanu-Ursula Le Guin

4. The Scarlet Pimpernel-Baroness Orczy

3. The Paleo Diet-Loren Cordain

2. Peter Pan-James Barrie

1. The Farthest Shore-Ursula Le Guin

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I am so far behind my scheduled reading. My auto-immune issues and crazy busy life have been giving me fuzzy brain....and made it almost impossible to follow even a news report....sigh.

 

I was just able to finish a Teen fiction....Where Things Come Back by J.C. Whaley.....and while I wouldn't consider it great literature, I was glad to be able to get through a full book:D. And follow the story.

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#84 The Paleo Diet (Loren Cordain.; non-fiction)

#83 The Primal Blueprint (Mark Sisson.; non-fiction)

In all honesty, the many low-carb debates/threads on this board inspired me to pick these up. I'm sure others have already observed that these seem like a rehash of Atkins. If, like me, you're late to the low-carb discussion, The Paleo Diet was the more readable text. Sisson's presentation was repetitive and poorly organized.

#82 How to Retire Overseas (Kathleen Peddicord.; non-fiction)

#81 Where to Retire (John Howells.; non-fiction)

I keep returning to this topic, making new and improved (tentative) plans, running the numbers with all sorts of scenarios in mind. It's not so much that I read such books as pore over them, adding notes to my "Retirement" file, daydreaming, and reading sections aloud to Mr. M-mv.

#80 The Outsourced Self (Arlie Russell Hochschild.; non-fiction)

Related articles here and here. The Time Bind and The Second Shift fascinated me, but this one... not so much. It may be partially my fault, though: I've been reading it in fits and starts for about six weeks.

 

With these additions to this year's reading list, I am now current on personal goal to read 52 non-fiction books in 2012: I've completed 32, to date.

 

On an unrelated but equally woot-worthy note, I passed the 500-mile mark on yesterday's ride, which means I may hit 750 (or more!) before the riding season ends.

 

Complete list of books read in 2012 can be found here.

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Read "What Alice Forgot" in just a few days this week. I liked it, it made me laugh out loud in some places and made me feel sad for the family in others. That said, the language was a bit shocking to me. I cringed every time I read that particular four letter word. Don't read much main stream fiction, I know. Is vulgar language the norm?

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Read "What Alice Forgot" in just a few days this week. I liked it, it made me laugh out loud in some places and made me feel sad for the family in others. That said, the language was a bit shocking to me. I cringed every time I read that particular four letter word. Don't read much main stream fiction, I know. Is vulgar language the norm?

 

That's the book I need to read this week (for my book club). I keep meaning to pick it up & start, but it just doesn't really seem like my style of book. So, I keep pushing it aside, in favor of other things that keep coming in from the library. I really, really need to start it....

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That's the book I need to read this week (for my book club). I keep meaning to pick it up & start, but it just doesn't really seem like my style of book. So, I keep pushing it aside, in favor of other things that keep coming in from the library. I really, really need to start it....

 

I think once you start it you'll find it's an easy read. I'm still contemplating what my next book will be:001_huh:

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The Children's Blizzard -- David Laskin -- about an unexpected, unpredicted blizzard that killed hundreds in the Dakotas/Minnesota in the 1880's, mostly children walking home from prairie schoolhouses. It is very well-written microhistory if you like books like Isaac's Storm or The Johnstown Flood.

:seeya:

 

Dh read this book last years, standing up in the study:lol:. He's a weather watcher (and we live in the area) and thought the weather in this book fascinating.

 

I read Have His Carcase by Sayers over the week-end (car trip). It wasn't my fav Wimsey/Vane mystery. I thought the ending was clever but the mystery was a convoluted mess.

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Finished Tolstoy and the Purple Chair by Nina Sankovitch. Interesting how she gained insight and recovered from the grief of her sister's death through reading books. The majority of the books she highlighted would have just been too angsty for me and depressed me. However will spend a bit of time on her website readallday.org and check out her reviews.

 

Starting Carlos Ruiz Zafon's The Prisoner of Heaven.

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I just finished The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Weird-Sisters-Eleanor-Brown/dp/0425244148/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1343785437&sr=1-1&keywords=the+weird+sisters+by+eleanor+brown

 

I did not think I would like it, but the truth is that I *really* enjoyed this book which was recommended to me by MY sister. The narrator of the story is actually "the three sisters" as one voice. It was quite interesting to read from this point of view. My sister and I have enjoyed discussing this book.

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I am now reading The Rook by Daniel O'Malley.

 

Book description from amazon:

 

 

"The body you are wearing used to be mine." So begins the letter Myfanwy Thomas is holding when she awakes in a London park surrounded by bodies all wearing latex gloves. With no recollection of who she is, Myfanwy must follow the instructions her former self left behind to discover her identity and track down the agents who want to destroy her.

 

She soon learns that she is a Rook, a high-ranking member of a secret organization called the Chequy that battles the many supernatural forces at work in Britain. She also discovers that she possesses a rare, potentially deadly supernatural ability of her own.

 

In her quest to uncover which member of the Chequy betrayed her and why, Myfanwy encounters a person with four bodies, an aristocratic woman who can enter her dreams, a secret training facility where children are transformed into deadly fighters, and a conspiracy more vast than she ever could have imagined.

 

Filled with characters both fascinating and fantastical, THE ROOK is a richly inventive, suspenseful, and often wry thriller that marks an ambitious debut from a promising young writer."

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Maus - All of a sudden, these books just *popped out* at me from your enviably long list of completed reading! Dh really likes the Brother Cadfael programs. I think there were originally thirteen episodes, all of which he watched. I recently watched "The Virgin in the Ice" and was surprised at how much I liked the program, since I generally find it hard to get involved in stories set that far back in history. Since you have read six of the books, you must enjoy them! Do you advise reading them in any particular order? Our library has eight of Ellis' books.
Sorry, I didn't respond sooner. We are visiting my mom and have been so busy, I only go on the internet at our motel after the kids are in bed.

 

In answer to your question, I'm the sort that generally reads in order of publication, but the first Cadfael I ever read, the one that hooked me, was "The Virgin in the Ice," which is the sixth book, I think. That's not a bad book to start with. One of my favorites, I don't know why, is "The Leper of St. Giles."

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#85 Epic Fail (Claire LaZebnik) YA fiction. Loosely patterned on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, this was almost painfully cute.

 

Am currently reading Frankenstein with the Misses and What Alice Forgot (thanks to a discussion here) for fun.

 

Complete list of books read in 2012 can be found here.

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I just finished The First 20 Minutes by Gretchen Reynolds. Very interesting information, and it gave me lots more reasons to exercise!

 

I'm listening to Farm City by Novella Carpenter and it is hitting very close to home, because I seem to have fallen for the gateway drug of urban farming (chickens) and have plans to expand my little homestead (a beehive next year--if I can convince DH). :lol: At first, I wasn't really into the book, but now I'm really enjoying it.

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79. Half Broke Horses by Jeannette Walls~memoir, southwest, early 30th century. Walls remembers the life of her maternal grandmother Lily Casey Smith, a woman who broke horses, ran ranches, flew airplanes, taught 1-room schools, and self-educated herself. If you enjoyed her other memoir The Glass Castle you will see a lot of what influenced her mother's sense of adventure.

 

78. The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack by Mark Hodder~science fiction, alternate history, Richard Burton, steampunk. Fun. Reading it with my husband. There were things I was slightly disappointed in, but its fun to read aloud (not to children obviously, unless you want to explain Swinburne's proclivity for pain). I liked the re-imagining of historical characters (although they were a might hard on Isabel) and the use of the spring heel jack myth. Lots of action. Looking forward to the next book.

 

77. The Deception at Lyme (or the Peril of Persuasion) by Carrie Bebris~Jane Austen, Mr. and Mrs. Darcy, mystery. Oh how much was going on in this book, perhaps a bit too much. :) I've really enjoyed this series though and I'm sad that this is the last (so far). This one really made me wish I'd read Persuasion recently though. It would have helped with understanding some of the characters and plot. I recommend the whole series for people who enjoy Jane Austen.

 

Best of the Year

*Top 5

**Number 1

 

68. The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall~children's fiction, sisters, adventure. *

61. The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum~non-fiction, forensic science, chemistry, New York, Prohibition. *

59. The Green Mile by Stephen King~supernatural, prison, 1930s. *

51. North by Northanger by Carrie Bebis~Jane Austen, mystery

50. The Essential Garden Design Workbook by Rosemary Alexander~non-fiction, gardening, landscape design.

47. The Monster of Florence by Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi~memoir, Italy, criminal case, serial killer.

41. Five Quarters of the Orange by Joanne Harris~fiction, France, WWII, food. *

36. Superfudge by Judy Blume~fiction, classic children's book.

30. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen~classic literature.

28. Divergent by Veronica Roth~youth fiction, dystopian.

23. Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood by Oliver Sacks~non-fiction, memoir.

18. A Thread of Grace by Mary Doria Russell~fiction, WWII **

16. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card~classic science fiction, read aloud.

11. Case Histories by Kate Atkinson~mystery

7. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman~non-fiction/medical

2. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton~Fiction

1. The Children's Book by A.S. Byatt~Fiction

 

Working on:

Blood Meridian (McCarthy) ~I will finish this, I will.

The Zookeeper's Wife

Fruit Trees in Small Spaces

Modern Fruit Science

__________________

Edited by LostSurprise
I edited my list...it was getting a bit long.
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I finished book #43

 

Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank

 

This book was so good. I would give it 4 1/2 stars. Growing up I never really worried about the cold war. I guess it yet seemed unreal to me. This book made me confront the issues that people would face after a nuclear war. My family and I recently moved from a farm to the city and after reading this book, I miss the farm even more. In a time when you have to provide for yourself the farm offers a ot of advantages.

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Publisher's Weekly Best new picks for the week of august 6 including a new translation of Dante's Inferno.

 

The Last Romanov by Dora Levy Mossanen is Barnes & Noble’s Free Friday pick for today! Pick it up today for free here: http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/The-NOOK-Blog/bg-p/Unbound/label-name/free%20fridays

Edited by Mytwoblessings
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I haven't posted in a while. I recently finished Great Expectations andGone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

 

Gone Girl was a fun read. The writing was good and the story was compelling. I love a good thriller.

 

Right now I'm reading The Name of the Wind. It's an epic fantasy. I like fantasy, but the writing for this book is a bit cheesy at times. The story in nice, but I'm unsure if I will read the next book in the series.

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Read and enjoyed Moonglow by Kristen Callihan; the book's spine says it's historical romance, but I'd categorize it as a historical paranormal romance. It's the sequel to the author's Firelight which I previously enjoyed.

 

I just finished Molly Harper's And One Last Thing ... which was an entertaining read (if such can be said about the break up of a marriage).

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I'm really excited to start Dawn's Early Light this week. Everyone has talked about it so much that I can't wait to get hooked!

 

Catherine, Called Birdy by Karen Cushman - a quick read. I find myself thinking about the protaganist even after the story is over and wanting to know what happened next.

 

The Mirror Cracked Side to Side by Agatha Christie - There was a mystery. Miss Marple solved it by being clever. Not great literature but I still enjoy them.

 

In progress:

 

Emma by Jane Austen

The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie (book club)

Dawn's Early Light by Elswyth Thane (recommended here)

Calico Bush by Rachel Field (read aloud)

 

2012 finished books:

 

89. Catherine, Called Birdy by Karen Cushman - YA (****)

88. The Mirror Cracked Side to Side by Agatha Christie (***)

87. The Princess Bride by William Goldman (*****)

86. Crocodiles on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (***)

86. The Tattooed Potato and Other Clues by Ellen Raskin - YA (***)

84. Supermarket by Satoshi Azuchi (**)

83. Kitchen by Banana Yoshimoto (*****)

82. Stein on Writing by Sol Stein (****)

81. Order from Chaos by Liz Davenport (**)

 

Books 41 - 80

Books 1 - 40

 

Amy's Rating System:

 

***** - Fantastic, couldn't put it down

**** - Very good

*** - Enjoyable but nothing special

** - Not recommended

* - Horrible

Edited by aggieamy
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Whoever recommended Lauri Notaro (Idiot Girls Action -Adventure Club). THANK YOU!!! I decided to deep clean my house...and have been really enjoying her books...one article at a time. I have been lol'ing:lol::lol: all weekend long. My kids are all just looking at me weird:D

 

Thanks Again!!

faithe

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