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that is not the same denomination as you?

 

I don't know. My dh wants us to go to a United Methodist church (and we are Catholic) because it's closer, it's smaller, the religious ed classes are free (as opposed to $150 each kid) and he physically likes the church better. He has brought canned goods for the pantry there and always comments on how friendly they are there. I bring any donations to the Catholic church because I like that church and I like the Priest very much but I wouldn't mind switching... to another Catholic Church.

 

Would it be weird to attend a church when you are not the same denomination?

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I'd honor your dh's desire to go there - at least for a visit. Check them out, see how you like it.

 

I don't get caught up on denominations. The bible is God's word and as long as they're not straying from it, I don't care where I go to church.

 

Then again....... we're not attending any church right now. We are meeting with other Christians in my home and theirs. We gave up on the institutional church because so much of what goes on there is not biblical - even sinful.

 

Denise

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well, it depends on what you are going to church for. Catholic to Methodist is a HUGE theological change. Different beliefs. Are you going to church for the church fellowship? Or to worship the way YOU theologically believe?

 

I grew up Southern Baptist and when my dh and I joined the United Methodist Church years ago my mother about died ;-) I had to do the research on the theological differences b/c honestly my upbringing hadn't exposed me to the differences. I was ok with it and we joined. I spent the next year learning more. The reformed posts on this site sent me studying even more!

 

We moved and have finally found a new church....not United Methodist. Now that I know my theological beliefs I can't imagine joining a church I don't agree with. However, my years in the UMC church were good ones. They had a lot(!!!) of ministries and I was able to get involved, my kids always had activities with other Christians, and we were happy. We just didn't have that same great experience with the UMC where we moved.

 

So should you go join this great church near you that has everything you want? Sure, why not, if the church environment is what matters to your family. but the sermons will be different. there isn't a confession to go to. Can you live with the theological differences?

 

But if you truly believe the Catholic beliefs then I would think you would be unhappy in a church outside your denomination.

 

I am not back in the Baptist church. Or the UMC church. I had to find where I fit. I had to find a place that theologically lined up with my beliefs as best it could, and find a place my family enjoyed and wanted to be part of. It has a lot less than our old UMC. But it has a lot of TRUTH that I wanted in the sermons. The activities with come as we grow.

 

I would pray about it. You and your dh need to be on the same page. He is Catholic? Or did he join your church when you married? You need to search your heart and decide if the Catholic traditions are what you want.....or will being part of a dynamic church be enough?

 

good luck to you....hard choices....I know b/c anything other than Southern Baptist was wrong in my upbringing. Stepping out was hard. Changing was hard. But I learned along the journey and now can find a church easier b/c I know what I truly believe. Don't just look at your Catholic beliefs. Look into the UMC beliefs. Most are Armenian-Wesleyan. Look into the Calvinist Reformed. Look into theology and you will find where you belong :-)

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We are Presbyterians, but have attended Episcopal, Catholic, and Baptist churches over the years. Unless you have a serious conflict with doctrine, I wouldn't let the name on the door bother you. ETA: As Tess pointed out, however, there are huge differences in belief between Catholic and Protestant denominations...

 

Ria

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My dh is Catholic and would never consider going to another denomination church. If my dd goes to a different service with a frined, he takes her to a Catholic service the same weekend - apparently zero tolerance is the norm for his generation.

 

However, being an outsider, I know exactly what you husband means. I've always found the Catholic church to be very..dour. People smile and are polite, but they aren' "happy". I've been to other churches on occasion and the people are always much more animated and outgoing. Maybe your husband is just trying to experiment and find something more satisfying?

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I've been burned by loyalty to a specific denomination, so I hold my denominational affiliation lightly. I would not have trouble switching to a different Protestant denomination. (Then again, I'm way out here on the liberal fringe of belief altogether.)

 

Of course, Catholic to Methodist seems like a pretty big jump to me.

 

*gently* Is your husband trying to tell you that he doesn't believe in Catholicism any more?

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I think it is one thing for you to attend a non-Catholic service and quite another for a 7 and 5 1/2 year old to attend.

 

The teachings of the Catholic Church are just that - the teachings of the Catholic Church. If I were very concerned that my child learn the magisterium, the last thing I would do is enroll him in a youth program of another denomination.

 

I realize that many people don't agree with this view, but I won't even join our (ONLY) local homeschool group because they are evangelical. Kids are impressionable; I don't want things that dh and I view as either not in keeping with our family's values/goals/beliefs or simply wrong being presented as "right" until he is old enough, and has a firm enough grasp, on his own theological underpinnings.

 

JMO

 

 

asta

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well, it depends on what you are going to church for. Catholic to Methodist is a HUGE theological change. Different beliefs. Are you going to church for the church fellowship? Or to worship the way YOU theologically believe?

 

I grew up Southern Baptist and when my dh and I joined the United Methodist Church years ago my mother about died ;-) I had to do the research on the theological differences b/c honestly my upbringing hadn't exposed me to the differences. I was ok with it and we joined. I spent the next year learning more. The reformed posts on this site sent me studying even more!

 

We moved and have finally found a new church....not United Methodist. Now that I know my theological beliefs I can't imagine joining a church I don't agree with. However, my years in the UMC church were good ones. They had a lot(!!!) of ministries and I was able to get involved, my kids always had activities with other Christians, and we were happy. We just didn't have that same great experience with the UMC where we moved.

 

So should you go join this great church near you that has everything you want? Sure, why not, if the church environment is what matters to your family. but the sermons will be different. there isn't a confession to go to. Can you live with the theological differences?

 

But if you truly believe the Catholic beliefs then I would think you would be unhappy in a church outside your denomination.

 

I am not back in the Baptist church. Or the UMC church. I had to find where I fit. I had to find a place that theologically lined up with my beliefs as best it could, and find a place my family enjoyed and wanted to be part of. It has a lot less than our old UMC. But it has a lot of TRUTH that I wanted in the sermons. The activities with come as we grow.

 

I would pray about it. You and your dh need to be on the same page. He is Catholic? Or did he join your church when you married? You need to search your heart and decide if the Catholic traditions are what you want.....or will being part of a dynamic church be enough?

 

good luck to you....hard choices....I know b/c anything other than Southern Baptist was wrong in my upbringing. Stepping out was hard. Changing was hard. But I learned along the journey and now can find a church easier b/c I know what I truly believe. Don't just look at your Catholic beliefs. Look into the UMC beliefs. Most are Armenian-Wesleyan. Look into the Calvinist Reformed. Look into theology and you will find where you belong :-)

 

:iagree:

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Thanks for all of the thoughtful responses. :)

 

My dh was raised as a Lutheran and joined my Church when we got married (but did not convert - he is a member of our Church though). (That's funny Tess in the Burbs that you would ask that! lol)

 

It has seemed like no big deal to dh that he attends a Catholic church from a Lutheran church, denominations don't seem to bother him at all.

 

I am a little embarrassed to admit that I don't know that much about any other Christian religions except for Catholic. Almost every friend I've ever had was either Catholic or Jewish and my dh never discusses being Lutheran.

 

Actually, we went to my niece's Christening at an Evangelical Presbyterian Church and my dh looked at me during the service and said it is taking everything he had not to walk out. It was very fire and brimstone, almost sounding hate filled. The pastor started out by saying that just because this was a Christening didn't mean it would be short. Oh, and children were not welcome, my kids were quickly whisked into the baby room. So there you are, my only time in a non Catholic Church. :001_huh:

 

My dh thinks this UM church is friendlier, smaller and closer. Like I said, he doesn't seem to care what the denomination on the door is.

 

I like the Catholic church and don't have a desire to leave but I don't know what is out there.

 

**My dh and I tend to be socially liberal and when we go to mass, we NEVER get a sermon about homosexuality, evolution, birth control, abortion or political hot topics. Our church (and the other Catholic church I was raised in) mainly deals with passages from the bible, helping others, prayers, song, eucharist, and inspiring us to live our life through Christ, giving to others and not forgetting Jesus died for our sins... etc.

 

That is the way we like like it - we like to pray, ask for forgiveness, communion, sing, hear stories read from the bible, the gospel, then a sermon - usually inspiring and almost always about Stewardship being a way of life and to place God first in everything we do.

 

Oh goodness. Maybe you should go and just see if you like it then decide if it's something you would like. Maybe you all can switch up every other weekend or something?
:lol: That is what my dh says but I was wondering if it would be weird to attend a church that is a different denomination. KWIM? My dh had no problem going to CC from Lutheran but he really truly doesn't care about denominations. I, however, feel like I am Catholic and should attend a Catholic church. Sounds kind of kooky now that I'm typing it out! :lol: Some of the responses here were helpful and I suppose, if I attend church a few times and like what I'm hearing then I'll get over it. Edited by Jumping In Puddles
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As long as they're teaching from God's Word and are a healthy church, then denominations mean nothing in the eyes of God.

 

I've always used a tree to illustrate denominational differences. Christ came and showed us how to live Godly lives, so we'll illustrate by saying that He planted a tree. Denominations are made when man skews a branch on the Christian tree, if you will. There are many denominations, or branches on the tree. Some are whitered, some bear no fruit, some are far from the roots, where one finds nourishment. Other denominational branches are closer to the trunk, closer to the roots, closer to food and drink.

 

I was raised catholic, but am now just a bible believing Christian, trying to stay close to the roots in His strength and power and by faith. It's all about having a relationship with the Lord, not about where we go to church. Please don't restrict your worship by man's labelling methods, or denominations. You lose nothing by going to check this church out, or another. You may be surprised that the lessons you learn during the sermon can be very applicable to everyday life, interesting, and encouraging to your walk.

 

I understand that catholics are generally taught (or at least think) that anything outside of the catholic church ought to be avoided like the plague... I understand you're scared... but try to keep it in perspective. It's really all about a relationship with the Lord. :grouphug:

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that is not the same denomination as you?

 

I don't know. My dh wants us to go to a United Methodist church (and we are Catholic) because it's closer, it's smaller, the religious ed classes are free (as opposed to $150 each kid) and he physically likes the church better. He has brought canned goods for the pantry there and always comments on how friendly they are there. I bring any donations to the Catholic church because I like that church and I like the Priest very much but I wouldn't mind switching... to another Catholic Church.

 

Would it be weird to attend a church when you are not the same denomination?

 

It all depends on how closely you personally hold to your Catholic faith and some of thier beliefs. For example, the United Methodist denomination is active in preserving a woman's right to choose abortion legally. This would be very contrary to how most Catholics believe.

 

We moved to a small town where there is a wonderful United Methodist church down the street. We visited and loved it. However, after researching the denomination on the internet at their OWN website, we decided that the differences were too vast to ignore. We go to church in another town.

 

I am not Catholic, but I am pro-life and based on what I read on the United Methodist's own website, could never consider attending a church in that denomination.

Edited by katemary63
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I was Catholic, but as a family we could never find a Catholic church that suited us. Dh was raised Lutheran. I'd also attended, at different times, a Lutheran church and an Episcopalian church. Ultimately, we ended up at a Reformed Church. It has been a blessing in our lives.

 

I don't know, dh has studied a lot of different religions and would consider himself, when pressed, a Buddhist. He always tells me that if I want to truly find God all I need to do is go outside and sit under a tree, or spend an hour amongst the poor. To each his own. I think the OP should do whatever she feels comfortable with.

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It all depends on how closely you personally hold to your Catholic faith and some of thier beliefs. For example, the United Methodist denomination is active in preserving a woman's right to choose abortion legally. This would be very contrary to how most Catholics believe.

 

 

 

Actually, there are a few things about the Catholic beliefs where I differ and I know the Pope and Catholic literature has plenty to say, our Church never weighs in (during Sunday mass) on birth control, divorce, abortion, evolution, or homosexuality. The UMC, may align better with some of my beliefs... but ugggh, I'm Catholic! Dang, the church did a good job of planting that in my mind! :tongue_smilie:

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It all depends on how closely you personally hold to your Catholic faith and some of thier beliefs.

 

Have to agree with Katemary here. If your Catholic faith is important to you, then you belong in a Catholic church. Mass isn't just the Homily or fellowship - it is about the sacrament of the Eucharist. That is why dh and I find a Catholic church to go to no matter where we go on vacation - even camping:).

 

Sunday Mass and Holy Day Obligation

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Have to agree with Katemary here. If your Catholic faith is important to you, then you belong in a Catholic church. Mass isn't just the Homily or fellowship - it is about the sacrament of the Eucharist. That is why dh and I find a Catholic church to go to no matter where we go on vacation - even camping:).

 

Sunday Mass and Holy Day Obligation

 

This, right there is what bothers me about going to a different church. I also see value in what specialmama and Denise said:

I don't get caught up on denominations. The bible is God's word and as long as they're not straying from it, I don't care where I go to church.

 

 

 

As long as they're teaching from God's Word and are a healthy church, then denominations mean nothing in the eyes of God.

...

It's all about having a relationship with the Lord, not about where we go to church.

Edited by Jumping In Puddles
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that is not the same denomination as you?

 

I don't know. My dh wants us to go to a United Methodist church (and we are Catholic) because it's closer, it's smaller, the religious ed classes are free (as opposed to $150 each kid) and he physically likes the church better. He has brought canned goods for the pantry there and always comments on how friendly they are there. I bring any donations to the Catholic church because I like that church and I like the Priest very much but I wouldn't mind switching... to another Catholic Church.

 

Would it be weird to attend a church when you are not the same denomination?

 

I read through the replies from others and your answers.

 

My advice is to go Eucharistic Adoration for a few days and sit and listen to Jesus. He is Present there, Body, Blood, Soul & Divinity.

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Our Priest says that it is all right for Catholics to attend other denominations. Because in a lot of Catholic churches there are mixed marriages. Such as a Catholic being married to a Methodist. The only thing a Catholic can not do at a different church is to receive communion.

 

If you remember when John Kerry was running for president, he attended a Baptist church and took communion. There was a large uproar that he should be ex communicated from the Catholic Church for this.

 

Remember as a Catholic, we believe that the Host and the wine are indeed changed into the true body and blood of Christ. Most of our Protestant cousins believe the Host and the wine are just a symbol of Christ's body and blood.

 

Blessings

 

Zoraida

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I wouldn't prejudge the Methodists on your experience with the Presbyterians, especially evangelical ones. Quite different theological strains and quite different perspectives on original sin, etc.

 

The biggest issue I can think of for you may be in the way you view the Eucharist. http://www.umc.org/site/c.lwL4KnN1LtH/b.2311293/k.BD59/United_Methodists_and_Communion_Some_Questions_and_Answers.htm talks about it from a United Methodist viewpoint. There will not be confession, there will not be Communion at every service, etc. In most Protestant churches, the sermon is the focal point of the service rather than Communion. Looks like the UM also allow young children to take Communion.

 

The differences in services between a very liturgical Protestant denomination such as Lutheran and Roman Catholic are not going to be as apparent as they are in something like evangelical Presbyterian (or any in the Reform tradition). There are very liberal to very conservative groups in any denomination and the evangelical end of any of them is going to usually be much more conservative. In something like Methodist or Lutheran, there is likely also to be a range of how "high church" (how liturgical) they may be. Not knowing where the Methodist church you mention falls on that spectrum, I can't predict how different the worship experience will be. They are likely not to celebrate a lot of the feast days and holidays you are used to in the Catholic Church.

 

To give an example, I grew up Presbyterian (but not evangelical). We had Communion 4 times a year and it was seen as symbolic, definitely no transubstantion. We celebrated Easter and Christmas, but that was really it as far as religious holy days. No Lent or Advent or any others. A Methodist church may be more likely to do something for Lent or Advent.

 

Do some research into the beliefs of the particular church and it's affiliation (and realize that there are different varieties of Methodist who may have quite different doctrines and practices). That will give you a better idea if it's going to be difficult for you theologically long term, particularly when it comes to the raising of the children.

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You know, if you're Catholic, you need to go to a Catholic church. You can go with your dh if you'd like to, but you need to go to Mass. And if your dc are baptized, they need to go to Mass, too.

 

Religious classes at the Methodist church will not be the same as those at your Catholic church, because, well, they won't be Catholic instruction.

 

This is when you need to decide how important your Cathlic faith is to you, because it isn't simply a matter of choosing *this* church or *that* church.

 

Have you talked to your pastor?

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Our Priest says that it is all right for Catholics to attend other denominations. Because in a lot of Catholic churches there are mixed marriages. Such as a Catholic being married to a Methodist. The only thing a Catholic can not do at a different church is to receive communion.

 

If you remember when John Kerry was running for president, he attended a Baptist church and took communion. There was a large uproar that he should be ex communicated from the Catholic Church for this.

 

Remember as a Catholic, we believe that the Host and the wine are indeed changed into the true body and blood of Christ. Most of our Protestant cousins believe the Host and the wine are just a symbol of Christ's body and blood.

 

Blessings

 

Zoraida

 

The Priest who married us told me that I am able to take communion in any church. :confused: He said my dh's Lutheran family would not be able to take communion at our church so we should NOT offer it at all, not to have a mass to be fair to his family. That was when he explained that Catholics use to NOT be able to take communion elsewhere but has since changed. :confused:

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I hate to put a lot of pressure on you, but this is a decision you're going to have to make soon. If your 6yo doesn't attend CCE next school year, he won't be able to do his First Communion at the end of 2nd grade with his agemates. You have to do 2 years of CCE to be eligible for sacramental prep (at least in my archdiocese, and I'm pretty sure this is a standard rule). Of course, you can do your First Communion late, but it wouldn't be the same experience as doing it with your classmates at the traditional time.

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The Priest who married us told me that I am able to take communion in any church. :confused: He said my dh's Lutheran family would not be able to take communion at our church so we should NOT offer it at all, not to have a mass to be fair to his family. That was when he explained that Catholics use to NOT be able to take communion elsewhere but has since changed. :confused:

 

You may want to talk further with your priest about this to clarify the RCC position. I am not a Roman Catholic, nor have I ever been one, so take my understanding with a grain of salt. Based on what I have read, a Roman Catholic is not permitted to participate in Communion in a Protestant setting because the RCC does not consider such Communions to be valid because they do not adhere to the doctrine of transubstantiation (among other doctrinal differences). Orthodox Churches, however, are in a different category and considered to have valid Eucharists.

 

http://www.ewtn.com/expert/answers/intercommunion.htm

In keeping with the sacramental meaning of the Eucharist this canon reserves the sacraments to Catholics, that is, those who are in communion with the Church. It then addresses the question of Catholics receiving the sacraments from non-Catholics. It sets the following strict conditions:

 

a. necessity or genuine spiritual advantage

b. when the danger of error or indifferentism is avoided

c. it is physically or morally impossible to approach a Catholic minister

d. a church which has valid sacraments

 

This last condition is the key one, since it eliminates ALL the Reformation churches (Anglican, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist etc.), none of whom have valid sacred orders, and therefore, a valid Eucharist. The possibility of a Catholic receiving from the minister of another church, when the first three conditions are fulfilled, is limited to the Orthodox Churches, other Oriental Churches, Old Catholics, Polish National and others whose sacraments are recognized by the Holy See. As paragraph 3 notes, the members of those churches may likewise receive from a Catholic minister, when they ask and are disposed.

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I hate to put a lot of pressure on you, but this is a decision you're going to have to make soon. If your 6yo doesn't attend CCE next school year, he won't be able to do his First Communion at the end of 2nd grade with his agemates. You have to do 2 years of CCE to be eligible for sacramental prep (at least in my archdiocese, and I'm pretty sure this is a standard rule). Of course, you can do your First Communion late, but it wouldn't be the same experience as doing it with your classmates at the traditional time.

 

I know! Actually, the sign up is this week for September. My dh is not happy that there is a $150 fee and that's another reason why he wants to consider the change now.

 

You may want to talk further with your priest about this to clarify the RCC position. I am not a Roman Catholic, nor have I ever been one, so take my understanding with a grain of salt. [/i]

 

Ok, that Priest has been long gone and maybe I am remembering wrong but I really thought he said that. I have not gone to another Church to take communion but I thought I could.

Edited by Jumping In Puddles
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You know, if you're Catholic, you need to go to a Catholic church. You can go with your dh if you'd like to, but you need to go to Mass. And if your dc are baptized, they need to go to Mass, too.

 

Religious classes at the Methodist church will not be the same as those at your Catholic church, because, well, they won't be Catholic instruction.

 

This is when you need to decide how important your Cathlic faith is to you, because it isn't simply a matter of choosing *this* church or *that* church.

 

Have you talked to your pastor?

 

My dc were both baptized in the Catholic Church that we still belong to. If I enrolled them in Religious classes at the Methodist church, would my children be Methodist instead of Catholic?

 

I would like to also thank everyone who has participated in this thread, it has been very interesting and WAY MORE COMPLICATED than I thought it would be.

Edited by Jumping In Puddles
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If your children are going to Methodist religion classes, then, yes, they would become Methodist. The Catholic church isn't going to recognize those classes as part of the process of becoming Catholic, and I would think the Methodist church would be just as confused, as I am sure they intend those classes to prepare children to be Methodist.

 

If you are Catholic and want to stay Catholic, you need to be in a Catholic parish. Especially if you intend to raise your children to be Catholic. If that is the case, you might be able to attend another Catholic parish that would suit you better. The doctrine is the same, but the character and flavor differ between parishes.

 

So this is really an issue of whether you intend to remain Catholic, IMO.

 

ETA: I will be praying for you as you both decide this. I am a convert, and sometimes I see some of the same issues your DH is talking about and find myself wishing that I could take the best of that and put it into my parish. What keeps me Catholic is the Eucharist. Best wishes!

Edited by Asenik
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So this is really an issue of whether you intend to remain Catholic, IMO.

 

Thanks. I can't imagine NOT being Catholic. I was kind of hoping that the rituals would be a little different but the message would be basically the same. We are following the same bible after all. :001_huh:

 

I do have some research to do and I will visit the Methodist church and speak with a pastor there.

 

Also, I asked my dh when he got home to tell me again why he wanted to change and if it had anything to do with RCC and he said no, it's nothing to do with the RCC but he would like a smaller church that he can be a part of without feeling lost in the crowd. He also likes that the church is physically closer and and the people he encounters there are always so much friendlier.

 

To him, he says he can go to any church and it's all the same message :001_huh: except his sisters church where they are just "crazy".

Edited by Jumping In Puddles
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Thanks. I can't imagine NOT being Catholic. I was kind of hoping that the rituals would be a little different but the message would be basically the same. We are following the same bible after all. :001_huh:

 

 

My dh was raised Methodist and joined the Catholic church in 2000. There are some BIG differences. We do have a lot of the same teachings, but actually not quite the same Bible (Protestants leave out quite a bit - several whole books). Also, some parts of the Bible that are the same we interpret differently (Eucharist is a big one). Definitely do some research on what the Methodists believe, and decide from there if you can accept all of the changes. It's not just a matter of where you spend that hour on Sunday, but figuring out which aligns more closely with what you really believe to be true about God and how the universe works.

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My dc were both baptized in the Catholic Church that we still belong to. If I enrolled them in Religious classes at the Methodist church, would my children be Methodist instead of Catholic?

 

I would like to also thank everyone who has participated in this thread, it has been very interesting and WAY MORE COMPLICATED than I thought it would be.

No. The Catholic Church still considers them to be Catholic, because they were baptized in the Church. The classes they take at the Methodist church will be different than what they will learn at the Catholic church's classes; the Church would consider this a very serious issue.

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The Priest who married us told me that I am able to take communion in any church. :confused: He said my dh's Lutheran family would not be able to take communion at our church so we should NOT offer it at all, not to have a mass to be fair to his family. That was when he explained that Catholics use to NOT be able to take communion elsewhere but has since changed. :confused:

I regret to say that I think your priest was wrong about your taking communion at non-Catholic churches.

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Thanks. I can't imagine NOT being Catholic. I was kind of hoping that the rituals would be a little different but the message would be basically the same. We are following the same bible after all. :001_huh:

 

Actually, I hate to break it to you, but you aren't. There are a number of books in the Catholic Bible that Protestants do not recognize as canonical and which are not included in most Protestant Bibles. Some will have them in a separate section called the Apocrypha. I know the Episcopal Church recognizes them as "useful for teaching" but not as canonical. I had never encountered them growing up as a Presbyterian.

 

http://www.christianbiblereference.org/faq_bibles.htm

The First Christian Bible

At the time the Christian Bible was being formed, a Greek translation of Jewish Scripture, the Septuagint, was in common use and Christians adopted it as the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. However, around 100 A.D., Jewish rabbis revised their Scripture and established an official canon of Judaism which excluded some portions of the Greek Septuagint. The material excluded was a group of 15 late Jewish books, written during the period 170 B.C. to 70 A.D., that were not found in Hebrew versions of the Jewish Scripture. Christians did not follow the revisions of Judaism and continued to use the text of the Septuagint as the Old Testament.

 

Protestant Bibles

In the 1500s, Protestant leaders decided to organize the Old Testament material according to the official canon of Judaism rather than the Septuagint. They moved the Old Testament material which was not in the Jewish canon into a separate section of the Bible called the Apocrypha. So, Protestant Bibles then included all the same material as the earlier Bible, but it was divided into two sections: the Old Testament and the Apocrypha. Protestant Bibles included the Apocrypha until the mid 1800s, and the King James Version was originally published with the Apocrypha. However, the books of the Apocrypha were considered less important, and the Apocrypha was eventually dropped from most Protestant editions.

 

Catholic and Orthodox Bibles

The Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches did not follow the Protestant revisions, and they continue to base their Old Testament on the Septuagint. The result is that these versions of the the Bible have more Old Testament books than most Protestant versions. Catholic Old Testaments include 1st and 2nd Maccabees, Baruch, Tobit, Judith, The Wisdom of Solomon, Sirach (Ecclesiasticus), additions to Esther, and the stories of Susanna and Bel and the Dragon which are included in Daniel. Orthodox Old Testaments include these plus 1st and 2nd Esdras, Prayer of Manasseh, Psalm 151 and 3rd Maccabees.

 

The New Testament

 

The Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox New Testaments are identical.

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Thanks for all of the thoughtful responses. :)

 

My dh was raised as a Lutheran and joined my Church when we got married. (That's funny Tess in the Burbs that you would ask that! lol)

 

It has seemed like no big deal to dh that he attends a Catholic church from a Lutheran church, denominations don't seem to bother him at all.

 

I am a little embarrassed to admit that I don't know that much about any other Christian religions except for Catholic. Almost every friend I've ever had was either Catholic or Jewish and my dh never discusses being Lutheran.

 

Actually, we went to my niece's Christening at an Evangelical Presbyterian Church and my dh looked at me during the service and said it is taking everything he had not to walk out. It was very fire and brimstone, almost sounding hate filled. The pastor started out by saying that just because this was a Christening didn't mean it would be short. Oh, and children were not welcome, my kids were quickly whisked into the baby room. So there you are, my only time in a non Catholic Church. :001_huh:

 

My dh thinks this UM church is friendlier, smaller and closer. Like I said, he doesn't seem to care what the denomination on the door is.

 

I like the Catholic church and don't have a desire to leave but I don't know what is out there.

 

**My dh and I tend to be socially liberal and when we go to mass, we NEVER get a sermon about homosexuality, evolution, birth control, abortion or political hot topics. Our church (and the other Catholic church I was raised in) mainly deals with passages from the bible, helping others, prayers, song, eucharist, and inspiring us to live our life through Christ, giving to others and not forgetting Jesus died for our sins... etc.

 

That is the way we like like it - we like to pray, ask for forgiveness, communion, sing, hear stories read from the bible, the gospel, then a sermon - usually inspiring and almost always about Stewardship being a way of life and to place God first in everything we do.

 

:lol: That is what my dh says but I was wondering if it would be weird to attend a church that is a different denomination. KWIM? My dh had no problem going to CC from Lutheran but he really truly doesn't care about denominations. I, however, feel like I am Catholic and should attend a Catholic church. Sounds kind of kooky now that I'm typing it out! :lol: Some of the responses here were helpful and I suppose, if I attend church a few times and like what I'm hearing then I'll get over it.

The Catholic Church is not another denomination. It is The Church.:)

 

You might want to ask some questions on a Catholic forum; I've learned much recently by going to the Defenders of the Faith forum.

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Would you and your children still be fulfilling your Sunday and Holy Day obligations and then, additional, attending the Methodist service with your dh? If that's what you intended, I think it would be extremely confusing to your children. When your children were baptized, you accepted the obligation and responsibility of raising them in the Catholic faith; that includes making sure they get to Mass on Sundays and Holy Days and are properly catechized so they can receive Reconciliation, Eucharist and Confirmation. They would not be able to do this if they are attending the Methodist church.

 

I would suggest you talk to your priest or deacon about this. I think you need to do some searching and determine where your faith lies. If you're Catholic, you need to be attending Mass. If you've searched, prayed and find yourself called to the Methodist Church, then you need to follow your conscience.

 

Janet

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My dh is Catholic and would never consider going to another denomination church. If my dd goes to a different service with a frined, he takes her to a Catholic service the same weekend - apparently zero tolerance is the norm for his generation.

 

 

Yes - if you are Catholic only a Catholic mass will satisfy your obligations. My in-laws carry it to an extreme - must be the right Catholics, too (Dominicans are the best... Jesuits - gasp!)

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My dh is Catholic and attends church with us at a UMC. He loves it! But his very Catholic parents still think he'll burn in hell for not attending a Catholic Mass every single week. They don't consider our church a "real" church. But now that his younger brother is an atheist, we are at least in the same ball park and don't have to hear about it much anymore. I personally was raised in the Air Force so never attended a church service that was strictly one denomination until I was 18 years old. Up until that point I attended the Protestant service because that's the one my friends went to. God didn't create denominations, we did.

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As long as they're teaching from God's Word and are a healthy church, then denominations mean nothing in the eyes of God.

 

I've always used a tree to illustrate denominational differences. Christ came and showed us how to live Godly lives, so we'll illustrate by saying that He planted a tree. Denominations are made when man skews a branch on the Christian tree, if you will. There are many denominations, or branches on the tree. Some are whitered, some bear no fruit, some are far from the roots, where one finds nourishment. Other denominational branches are closer to the trunk, closer to the roots, closer to food and drink.

 

I was raised catholic, but am now just a bible believing Christian, trying to stay close to the roots in His strength and power and by faith. It's all about having a relationship with the Lord, not about where we go to church. Please don't restrict your worship by man's labelling methods, or denominations. You lose nothing by going to check this church out, or another. You may be surprised that the lessons you learn during the sermon can be very applicable to everyday life, interesting, and encouraging to your walk.

 

I understand that catholics are generally taught (or at least think) that anything outside of the catholic church ought to be avoided like the plague... I understand you're scared... but try to keep it in perspective. It's really all about a relationship with the Lord. :grouphug:

:iagree: I went to UM church when I moved to NC from NH because I had stepped away from my Catholic faith (for a variety of reasons) years before. I was searching for God in my life though. I found the UM church to be a breath of fresh air, and the people were very nice. The traditional UM service is actually similar to a Catholic service in some ways (hymns, prayers, some of the wording). In fact, Methodism stemmed from Catholicism in that John Wesley believed there need not be the middle men (priests, Pope, etc) in order to have a relationship with God. So, that is why there are some similarities in prayers, etc. despite the theological changes in denomination. A good friend of mine, who was a devout Catholic all her life, just became a member at a local UM church because it was similar, but "warmer", than Catholicism.

 

Good luck as you work through this! :)

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I'm Methodist, and I will say that our particular church seems to draw folks from many different denominations. Not every congregation will be the same, of course, even within the same denomination, but at least at ours, folks seem to feel at home. I know we've got some former Catholics among us.

 

Some Methodist churches are very big on the liturgy (which I love) and some are more contemporary. That may make a big difference in how comfortable you are at the service. The Methodist policy on Communion is that all are welcome ... it's God's table, not ours. Of course, if your Catholic priest disagrees, then you'd likely be more comfortable not taking Communion at the Methodist church. But I just wanted you to know you'd be welcome. :)

 

As far as enrolling in the classes, you don't 'become' a Methodist until you stand in front of the church and take the membership vows (which may or may not include baptism, depending on whether the person was already baptized before ... and we do accept baptisms from other denominations). We baptize infants, as Catholics do, and children attend confirmation classes usually around middle school (at least around here). But there's no rule that says the child MUST be confirmed after taking the classes. It's up to the child and the family. I know one family in our church where the father is Muslim ... he permitted his wife to enroll the kids in class, and even though the kids wanted badly to be confirmed, he won't allow it till they are legally adult. Which is fine. We accept confirmations at all ages too. :)

 

Not sure if I am any help or not, but feel free to PM if you have any Methodist questions. :) And I do hope you find a church situation that works for all of you, whatever that may be.

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When my kids were younger I would go to mass with my family, then I'd go to a Protestant service or Sunday School somewhere else. At the time, I didn't know better.

 

Since then, I've learned that we, us, all of us, are the community. We are the Church. If we don't like the way things are, or if we feel there should be more small groups, more friendliness, we have to make it happen. Our Catholic Church is huge. We have 6 full, crowded masses on a weekend. It seems small, though, if you do everything at Church there is to do, you tend to see the same folks over and over again. One woman here started a Bible study on Wednesday nights. It was an easy night, because all the other churches were doing stuff that night. She's not an expert on the Bible, but she had good organizational skills, and some great folks come out, some of whom actually are experts, but didn't have the organizational skills. There are so many ways to get involved in works of mercy, or adult education, or faith formation, or Knights of Columbus, or daily mass, where you see a huge church whittled down to the few die-hard prayer warriors. And in a large church you can carve out little niches for yourself this way. Our parish has problems, but there won't be a church community anywhere on earth that doesn't have its shortcomings. If your husband finds a little Protestant church attractive at first, it's because he hasn't been there long enough to see the problems yet -- the internal squabbling, the power struggles, the theological differences, the hard feelings, the gossip, the sense that "we aren't doing enough here," or the sense that "we're doing so much here that our home life is suffering!"

 

Your husband needs to know that it's a serious business to leave the Catholic Church. It's not that Catholics think other Christians aren't Christian, but we do believe we have something that they (meaning Protestants) don't -- the Eucharist.

 

My parents just left the Church and it was a heartbreaking experience for me. They found a small Catholic Church a few years ago and I thought they were happy there. When they left my mom had all kinds of excuses. But I think one of the reasons they left was that they weren't entertained, and a local, liberal Lutheran church had a full social schedule. This is an awful reason to leave the Church.

 

Here's the Catechism of the Catholic Church on the issue:

 

#846: Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.

 

#847 Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation.

 

If you're in, then you leave, then it's a serious matter. If you have never been in the Catholic Church, then you're off the hook.

 

Peace to you and your husband. Please talk to a good priest. Find other congregations near you and stand your ground... insist that your husband try them. Don't receive communion at a Protestant Church. You can go to mass separately without your husband. And you probably made a promise when your children were baptized, that you would raise them Catholic. That promise should be honored.

Edited by Laura K (NC)
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If your husband finds a little Protestant church attractive at first, it's because he hasn't been there long enough to see the problems yet -- the internal squabbling, the power struggles, the theological differences, the hard feelings, the gossip, the sense that "we aren't doing enough here," or the sense that "we're doing so much here that our home life is suffering!"

 

 

Does none of that happen in a Catholic congregation?

 

(Not asking to be snarky ... genuinely curious ... it would certainly be awesome to see a church full of people who really did get along without any squabbling ever! I love my church dearly, but like any group of humans, it does have its difficult moments. I've never seen a congregation of any denomination that didn't.)

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I taught a Catholic Faith Formation class before where the kids would occasionally bring along non-Catholic friends. They didn't become "Catholic" because they came to classes.

 

But enrolling children in a Methodist Sunday school will mean they will not be learning about the Catholic faith. They will not understand the Catholic teaching on the Eucharist. And once someone communes in a Methodist Church and leave the Catholic Church behind, in a very real sense they are "excommunicating" themselves and their children.

 

For those who believe that every religion is more or less equal, this will seem like nonsense. But the more thoroughly you understand that the differences aren't just aesthetic or social, but earth-shakingly theological, the differences become great. The Christian goal should be unity, because that's what Jesus wanted. But the reality is that we are divided.

 

If my husband decided to become Methodist and forbade me to stay Catholic, I could not go to church at all. No offense to Methodists (I know some fine Methodists) -- but the lack of the Eucharist would make it almost meaningless to me.

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A lot of people have responded saying that denominations are man-made. While that may be, it's really about what you believe to be true.

 

Is the Eucharist really the body of Christ? Do you take it literally when you read Christ saying "This is my body" and "whoever eats my body and drinks my blood will have everlasting life?" If you don't, then it may be that a different church would better match your beliefs.

 

You said that your husband wants a friendlier church. I grew up Methodist (and attended a lot of Baptist churches with friends). It is friendly, though some more than others. Still, I converted. What I've learned is that Mass is meant to be very reverent. We are there to show thankfulness to God, as well as participating in the Sacrifice of the Mass. So, we don't socialize at Church. I don't allow my children to talk once we enter the Church. They can whisper to us if they need to go to the bathroom or something but they are to be reverent.

 

I'm sure this formal approach looks very dour and/or cold to outsiders who don't understand the beliefs. It did to me at first too.

 

That being said, we have met some wonderfully warm families. We became active in our Church (activities and groups) and that is where all the socializing and jovial interactions take place. We have a lot of fun with other Catholics but the culture works differently than in Protestant churches.

 

Denise

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It happens everywhere. There aren't any sinless congregations or pastors. That's why I think it's just like a divorce to leave the congregation you have been raised in for so long, unless it is a serious doctrinal difficulty. The human aspect of any church is flawed. The Catholic Church is in the news all the time because of one scandal or crisis or another. But I don't stay in a church for the people, or leave it for people, though I treasure the community. I stay in it for God.

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"the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation"

If "the Church" is necessary for salvation, then protestants are not saved.

Jesus said, "I am the way, the truth, and the life...no man comes to the Father but by me". It is Jesus Christ + nothing. You can't add to His salvation. "If it is by works, then it is no more by grace"

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I know someone else pointed this out, but the Catholic Church is not a "denomination" because it is the church from which all other Christian churches spring.

 

I am Catholic, in my lifetime, I have wrestled long and hard with it. Somedays I have considered myself "post Catholic" and in my college days "a recovering Catholic."

 

But, when I had children of my own, I realized there was no other place that had the reverence and peace I needed for Mass. The doctrines most align with my own because they shaped them -- though I reflect and disagree on many. I am at home in Mass, and ultimately, I truly believe in the works the Catholic Church does and they ways in which they handle service to others in our world.

 

And, when it comes down to it, I feel like being Catholic is as much a part of my "culture" as it is my faith.

 

Good luck, is such a personal journey, and I wish you well.

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....

 

http://www.ewtn.com/expert/answers/intercommunion.htm

In keeping with the sacramental meaning of the Eucharist this canon reserves the sacraments to Catholics, that is, those who are in communion with the Church. It then addresses the question of Catholics receiving the sacraments from non-Catholics. It sets the following strict conditions:

 

a. necessity or genuine spiritual advantage

b. when the danger of error or indifferentism is avoided

c. it is physically or morally impossible to approach a Catholic minister

d. a church which has valid sacraments

 

This last condition is the key one, since it eliminates ALL the Reformation churches (Anglican, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Methodist, Baptist etc.), none of whom have valid sacred orders, and therefore, a valid Eucharist. The possibility of a Catholic receiving from the minister of another church, when the first three conditions are fulfilled, is limited to the Orthodox Churches, other Oriental Churches, Old Catholics, Polish National and others whose sacraments are recognized by the Holy See. As paragraph 3 notes, the members of those churches may likewise receive from a Catholic minister, when they ask and are disposed.

 

I'm surprised that RC aren't supposed to participate in Anglican/Episcopalian communions, since the Episcopalian priests are permited to become RC priests with minimal, if any, extra training. I may be wrong on the amount of additional training. It's also my understanding that Episcopalian priests may become RC priests even if they are married at the time of their conversion.

Edited by Kathy in MD
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I'm surprised that RC aren't supposed to participate in Anglican/Episcopalian communions, since the Episcopalian priests are permited to become RC priests with minimal, if any, extra training. I may be wrong on the amount of additional training. It's also my understanding that Episcopalian priests may become RC priests even if they are married at the time of their conversion.

 

Well, I was Episcopalian for a number of years and can verify that they do not teach transubstantiation (it's consubstantiation, sort of between the Protestant and Roman Catholic teaching), nor accept the authority of the Pope. IIRC, the RCC does not recognize the Episcopal line of Apostolic succession, either. I'm sure there are other points of difference (aside from the ones on female ordination, rites of holy union for same sex couples, ordination of practicing homosexuals, married clergy, etc).

 

Here's an article addressing the issue. It appears to take several years to make the transition from one priesthood to the other. Yes, there is at least one RC priest in our area who converted while married. If his wife dies, he is bound to celibacy going forward.

 

http://www.ewtn.com/library/ANSWERS/MARPRIE.htm

 

Note that I am just relaying what I find from what seem to be reputable RCC sources---I am far from an expert on Roman Catholic doctrine.:)

Edited by KarenNC
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My dc were both baptized in the Catholic Church that we still belong to. If I enrolled them in Religious classes at the Methodist church, would my children be Methodist instead of Catholic?

 

I would like to also thank everyone who has participated in this thread, it has been very interesting and WAY MORE COMPLICATED than I thought it would be.

 

There are 2 major types of religious classes in the Methodist church. The first is Sunday School, which is for anyone of any age. These classes are general Christian education classes (of course from a Methodist view point) and range from heavy Bible study to what I refer to as applied Bible. These classes do not directly lead to church membership. Confirmation classes are the classes that are designed to prepare the child for church membership. Typically these classes are offered to 6-8th graders and last only a few months.

 

So your children could attend a Methodist church for several years without being offered the opportunity to become full, official members of the congregation and the Methodist church. However they, as all others who attend any Methodist church service, would be welcomed to participate in communion.

 

As far as doctirne is concerned, the big problem I personally could foresee having with switching to RC would be the change in the hierarchy of the denomination. (I haven't ever considered the switch) The UMC has a hierarchy, but it is driven more from the bottom up. (more democratic?) The ministers and laiety both attend the annual conferences and make major decisions for the confernece and eventually the denomination as a whole. Where as my understanding is that the RC church is much more top down governance.

 

But even if you agree with the UMC doctrine and like the people, you can miss the rituals that you grew up with. While in Germany, we attended an Episcopalian church. It was very high high church, complete with incense. Though I was very comfortable with the sermons, the doctrine and people, the rituals just felt very funny to me since I grew up in a Methodist church that was a simple, country church (low church). It just wasn't "church" for me.

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