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My husband thinks I'm OCD about teaching and require too much of my high schoolers.


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I think that "too much" is ultimately dependent upon the needs and personality of the student, the parents' goals for the education of their children, and the student's future plans. If you are educating your children with the intention of being able to send them to a top notch college fully prepared for the accompanying academic rigors, then, chances are, you are not asking too much of them. =)

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I agree with the PP who asked for the schedule. I posted something similar at the beginning of the year. My 9th grader does school 4 days/week and he works HARD for at least 8 hours/day. (4 of those hours are a CC chemistry class - 2x/week though). He usually has around 2 hours of additional work on the weekend. This was a change for him from previous years. I posted his schedule on the high school board and was given some good feedback. Basically, he and I decided that his work load wasn't too much. He agreed to stop complaining and just do it. (What a great kid - heh?)

 

Good luck finding your happy medium!!

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I have a son who is dysgraphic and a daughter. They are both in 11th grade. Also, they are both ADD, but my daughter does fairly well keeping on track this year. They both are in Algebra I/Saxon Math. She is about 15 lessons ahead of him.

 

They both are in German III and I use a German textbook-Komm Mit level 3. It is advanced, but I am going slowly and making them practice vocab. on a daily basis. I have 2 other students that come to my house once a week. They do partner work and I go over grammar. I give them the company quizzes and tests. I have a grade book and now I keep grades online with ClassBuilder.

 

I also teach medieval literature and we watch videos from the Teaching Company on medieval history. The instructor is a professor at the College of William & Mary. I do give them vocab. lists to help with comprehension and I stop the DVD so we can discuss the lecture. During the week they are given topics to study and I ask them to write a paragraph. Some examples are: What was the Council of Nycea? Who were the Vandals, Burgundians etc.,

 

For the literature class we read various books written during that time period such as, Beowulf, the morality play Everyman, Canterbury Tales.... I give them comprehension questions to answer. We read the book aloud and discuss the questions and they write down the answers.

 

For writing we do WriteShop. I am doing this with 2 other families. I basically teach the lesson and grade the paragraphs of the 7 kids taking the class.

 

We have had a hard time fitting science into our schedule. Last year they did Apologia Biology online with Potter's School. This semester I would like them to finish Apologia Physical Science which we didn't complete the previous year. I would then like to do Astronomy with them second semester. I got one of the books suggested by Susan Wise-Bauer in T W-T M.

Edited by lovetoteach
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I am preparing them for college. I want them to be familiar with important works of literature and history when their professors make references to them. I took some advanced classes in high school yet had never heard of the morality play "Everyman" until my German professor lectured on it. I had only read one play of Shakespeare and I never read "The Canterbury Tales". I want them to have a better education than I had. Reading what others are doing with their high schoolers leads to the conclusion that I'm not giving too much, in fact, they could probably do more science. I wanted them to take chemistry at the community college, but they have not complete algebra I.

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I am preparing them for college. I want them to be familiar with important works of literature and history when their professors make references to them. I took some advanced classes in high school yet had never heard of the morality play "Everyman" until my German professor lectured on it. I had only read one play of Shakespeare and I never read "The Canterbury Tales". I want them to have a better education than I had. Reading what others are doing with their high schoolers leads to the conclusion that I'm not giving too much, in fact, they could probably do more science. I wanted them to take chemistry at the community college, but they have not complete algebra I.

 

I am not a mom, but an '07 homeschool grad in my senior year at UNC. My perspective is that as long your students can keep up and are able to retain the material, you are not doing too much.

My mom put a great emphasis on literature in my high school curriculum and that has helped me immensely. As a dramatic arts major, I love that you are mentioning plays. They are, in my opinion, an incredibly important aspect of literature and the arts that is so very often overlooked in the traditional high school setting. I am not a huge fan of Shakespeare, but having read more than a handful of his plays really came in handy during my freshmen year Shakespeare class (English dept., not drama) when we were studying 1-2 plays a week.

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I have a son who is dysgraphic and a daughter. They are both in 11th grade. Also, they are both ADD, but my daughter does fairly well keeping on track this year. They both are in Algebra I/Saxon Math. She is about 15 lessons ahead of him.

 

They both are in German III and I use a German textbook-Komm Mit level 3. It is advanced, but I am going slowly and making them practice vocab. on a daily basis. I have 2 other students that come to my house once a week. They do partner work and I go over grammar. I give them the company quizzes and tests. I have a grade book and now I keep grades online with ClassBuilder.

 

I also teach medieval literature and we watch videos from the Teaching Company on medieval history. The instructor is a professor at the college of William & Mary. I do give them vocab. lists to help with comprehension and I stop the DVD so we can discuss the lecture. During the week they are given topics to study and I ask them to write a paragraph. Some examples are: What was the Council of Nycea? Who were the Vandals, Burgundians etc.,

 

For the literature class we read various books written during that time period such as, Beowulf, the morality play Everyman, Canterbury Tales.... I give them comprehension questions to answer. We read the book aloud and discuss the questions and they write down the answers.

 

For writing we do WriteShop. I am doing this with 2 other families. I basically teach the lesson and grade the paragraphs of the 7 kids taking the class.

 

We have had a hard time fitting science into our schedule. Last year they did Apologia Biology online with Potter's School. This semester I would like them to finish Apologia Physical Science which we didn't complete the previous year. I would then like to do Astronomy with them second semester. I got one of the books suggested by Susan Wise-Bauer in T W-T M.

 

Looking at your schedule, for 11th graders, they look like they are right where they should be on all classes except for math. They are a bit behind in math for students who want to go to college.

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They are a bit behind in math for students who want to go to college.

 

Agree. They should have completed algebra I and geometry. Algebra II should occur in 11th grade for the mathematically disinclined (which I definitely was/am). Higher level work will make them more competitive for college admissions.

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Agree. They should have completed algebra I and geometry. Algebra II should occur in 11th grade for the mathematically disinclined (which I definitely was/am). Higher level work will make them more competitive for college admissions.

 

I realize they are behind in math. My daughter did pre-algebra with Teaching Textbooks and just didn't learn it. I made her go back to Saxon and redo it, hence a year was wasted. My son also did a different pre-algebra program and didn't get it, so he too lost a year. I'm hoping they'll finish Alg. I during the year and will begin Alg. II. Geometry is included in Alg II and Advanced math with Saxon. I think they get a bit in Alg. I as well. They do the lectures with a cd and if they can't get a problem, they can watch it being worked with the cd. A lesson takes an hour or even 1 1/2 hours each day.

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Their schedule doesn't look like too much by any stretch. Their history and literature sounds better than public school, thankfully :). Their science is a tad behind. German III is good and sounds strong. I'm surprised he's not concerned about their math being so far behind (this is not a dig. All kids are different but college bound 11th graders are most certainly behind if they are only in Algebra I).

 

It sounds like they may not have enough credits by most people's (and schools and college's) standards which is a concern. You may have just missed letting us in on some of that. But if each year has looked similar to this one, you may need to step things up quite a bit to get a normal number of credits and to get that math and science up. Honestly, I would seriously consider an extra year.

Edited by 2J5M9K
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Their schedule doesn't look like too much by any stretch. Their history and literature sounds better than public school, thankfully :). Their science is a tad behind. German III is good and sounds strong. I'm surprised he's not concerned about their math being so far behind (this is not a dig. All kids are different but college bound 11th graders are most certainly behind if they are only in Algebra I).

 

It sounds like they may not have enough credits by most people's (and schools and college's) standards which is a concern. You may have just missed letting us in on some of that. But if each year has looked similar to this one, you may need to step things up quite a bit to get a normal number of credits and to get that math and science up. Honestly, I would seriously consider an extra year.

 

They've had a speech class, drama(put on plays), and music classes and also PE. My son did a grammar course with a tutor once a week last year along with a literature class at home. They are behind in science, but I think I can catch them up. Next year I'd like them to take chemistry at the community college if they are ready. My son is super stressed about math. I'm getting him a math tutor and he can use the summer to work as well. My daughter is working diligently with math and is getting it. They completed biology with Potter's School(online) and my son took a very intensive US Military History course last year also with Potter's school. He had two exams and a paper per semester. He is a strong writer and is an auditory learner so he got a lot out of the course and did well on the exams. He worked from a syllabus and was able to do all of the reading and keep up with taking notes during lectures. The first semester he wrote an eight page paper and second semester he wrote a 12 page paper. It was a huge confidence booster for him as he did well on the papers and I feel it gave him an idea of what lower level college classes require.

Edited by lovetoteach
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My husband thinks I'm OCD about teaching and require too much of my high schoolers.
I'd say if you have OCD and you require too much of your high schoolers then you have come to the right place! :D I think many of the moms here would fit that description and this is why their children are so well accomplished!

 

If anything, you will probably be told here that your schedule is too lenient! :tongue_smilie:

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I'd say if you have OCD and you require too much of your high schoolers then you have come to the right place! :D I think many of the moms here would fit that description and this is why their children are so well accomplished!

 

If anything, you will probably be told here that your schedule is too lenient! :tongue_smilie:

 

I have twins in the 11th grade, and their schedule is similar to the one your children are on, only mine are even further behind in math, simply because they struggled in their earlier years with it, and we have different curriculum. They are not on a full time college track, but more of a community/skill track. Even with that, I don't feel their schedule is unreasonable. If they decided to go full time, they'd have some math to make-up, but I'll let them decide that once they complete high school.

 

Physical science may be hard for them with their math level. That's the only place I may use caution, perhaps waiting until next year for that and picking up something else this year.

ETA: I was thinking Apologia PHYSICS, not their physical science. That's the higher level, right? We didn't do apologia, so it may be the right level. My mistake.

Edited by CLHCO
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Next year I'd like them to take chemistry at the community college if they are ready.

 

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the chances of this seems VERY slim. Where we've been, in order to take sciences, students must be college level in MATH (either by SAT/ACT scores or by the college's placement exam like the Accuplacer, or like in Texas, the THEA). Additionally, chemistry itself takes solid Algebra skills the student is comfortable with in order to balance equations. It sounds as if their math is too far behind for them to catch up enough to be college level by the end of this year. That really doesn't sound like a reasonable goal (though it would be possible for very strong students).

 

I'm glad that otherwise they are getting what they need. I figured you probably just hadn't added the information about "electives." But since other people here have tried to pass their kids off as 11th graders with only 8-10 credits....

 

I'm mostly thinking that the benefit of homeschooling is that we can tailor to our kids' needs. If an extra year will give them a boost or put them back on track, then sometimes that would be best. But lots of public schoolers take remedial classes going into college also so that isn't a horrible option either. As homeschoolers, we can just weigh these sorts of things out with our teens.

Edited by 2J5M9K
I meant college level in math to take sciences...
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I think you should stop thinking about them as 11th graders. They are far behind in math and in science. Far enough behind that without a major overhaul, they won't be ready for college in 2012. Even in community college, you generally need to have Alg 1, Geometry, and Alg, 2 in order to not take remedial classes. You also need three sciences in most states for college but that is easier remedied with CC. However for CC chemistry, I agree with Pamela and I doubt the college would even let them take it next year. You have to pass a math test or score well enough on the ACT. I think the ACT score was something like a 25 in math (though maybe 23). It isn't an easy thing to get if the student is weak in math. Could you maybe just put them on a five year high school program?

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I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the chances of this seems VERY slim. Where we've been, in order to take sciences, students must be college level (either by SAT/ACT scores or by the college's placement exam like the Accuplacer, or like in Texas, the THEA).

 

This depends some on the area and the school. I know many homeschoolers who do this as their high school credit, as long as they can pass the test showing they can handle the work, which they may be able to by the end of the year, depending on how far they get in their Algebra. You do not necessarily need to have had a previous high school chemistry course, but the math will be important.

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I think you should stop thinking about them as 11th graders. They are far behind in math and in science. Far enough behind that without a major overhaul, they won't be ready for college in 2012. Even in community college, you generally need to have Alg 1, Geometry, and Alg, 2 in order to not take remedial classes. You also need three sciences in most states for college but that is easier remedied with CC. However for CC chemistry, I agree with Pamela and I doubt the college would even let them take it next year. You have to pass a math test or score well enough on the ACT. I think the ACT score was something like a 25 in math (though maybe 23). It isn't an easy thing to get if the student is weak in math. Could you maybe just put them on a five year high school program?

 

I think it's unnecessary to consider it a 5 year high school program. You can graduate them, because they will have the basics for a high school diploma. Very few community colleges in our area require a transcript form a home schooler, only the test scores, because they are suspicious of a parent transcript anyway. They may like a list of courses taken at a college, but the communities will take anyone that can pass a test showing they can handle the workload.

 

Additionally, if her students were to finish physical science this year and chemistry (even if it's at home) next year, she will have the 3 years of science. If they get through Algebra I this year, take Geometry over the summer, and Algebra II the next year, most community colleges will gladly take them.

 

Most people here are on a track for a competitive university. If this were the case, I'd be doom and glooming over how behind they are as well, but they really are not in that bad of shape and there is time.

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I don't think you are requiring too much of your high school students. You know where they are behind and are working to bring them up-to-speed. The rest of their work sounds very much in line with high school requirements.

 

My youngest graduated from my homeschool last year. I required what I thought would prepare my kids for college and college work. I made schedules and deadlines and expected my kids to meet them. They had homework, wrote papers and took tests. They worked hard.

 

OTOH, there is a family in our church that also homeschools. They thought that I required waaaayyy too much from my high schoolers and made sure they told everyone that we thought "too highly of ourselves" because we required academic excellence. :001_huh: Ok........whatever. Each to their own, right? So they let their kids pick what curriculum they wanted to do...let them pick what they wanted to do each day....and what didn't get done just didn't get done. Their main focus was on socializing with the local homeschool group. The kids would learn what they needed to learn when they needed to learn it.

 

My youngest was the same age/grade as their oldest. She graduated last year, too. My youngest was admitted to every college she applied to and with scholarships because of her high ACT score and music auditions.

 

Friends daughter......is attending community college BUT not taking any college level courses. ALL of her courses are remedial because she is not ready to take any college level courses. And it looks like this will continue for next semester and into next year. So, basically, they are paying to have her take high school courses because she was not 'required' to do a lot in high school. Her ACT score was a 12. The college she really, really wanted to go to wouldn't even look at her. She was crushed. Actually, they had to have several meetings and conferences with the community college because they didn't think she was ready even for remedial classes, so she is there this semester on a trial basis. Sheesh.

 

So....preparing them to be ready for college level work and expecting a lot from them is a GOOD thing. What happened to my friend's daughter is the alternative.

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I agree with what's been said that it's definitely not too much - especially for 11th grade which is notoriously the most work intensive. I think the main thing is to talk with your husband and ask him why he thinks it's too much. Are the kids complaining to him about the work load? Are there things he'd like to do, but the schooling interferes with that? Or does he just base it on what school was like for him?

 

It sounds like you've got them on a good math program now, but I agree with others that it might not be a bad idea to consider them 10th grade and give them the extra time to get up to speed in math and science. I don't know your criteria for choosing curricula, but Apologia is very much self-teaching. Biology could easily be done by them even with them taking algebra I. Then they could go to chemistry next year, and if that's what they're most interested in, follow that up with a CC course in their senior year when they'll have finished algebra II and be working in Advanced Math.

 

Giving them an extra year could make the difference between having students who struggle in college, and those who will excel. :)

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i think you have two different things going on.

 

thing 1, where they are academically, folks have commented on and given you some good alternatives. the one thing i would add is that it is often possible to double up on math lessons. not on the same topic, but on a different one. once when we went travelling for a month, we came back and i had the kids do two math lessons a day, one in skills (fractions, percentages, whatever it was) and one on geometry from later in the year in their curriculum. because it was completely different, it worked well, and they caught up quickly. when we came to the geometry unit in the course of things, we did the review and then moved on.

 

thing 2, what your dh really means when he says they are doing too much, is worth a look at, too. (given that the people who replied all think you are being reasonable.)

 

does he mean you are stressed out and he wishes you weren't? that the kids are grumpy and complaining to him? that his coworkers are bugging him about homeschooling? that he doesn't feel included? that they are working on the weekends when he'd like to be with them?

 

good luck!

ann

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No, I don't think you are expecting too much of your 11 graders.

 

I agree with what the PPs have said about math and science. Do you intend for them to go to CC before a 4 year college? If so, they won't have to take the SAT. But if they have to take the SAT they really need to have completed geometry before taking they test to do well. There is a lot of geometry in the SAT.

 

I also think that at this point they should be writing papers on both history and literature, beyond answering questions and paragraphs. Are they doing any literary analysis papers on what they are reading? Write Shop is great, but they need to be applying their writing skills to the other topics they are studying in order to be prepared for college. Also longer term papers, one or two a year, with foot notes, etc. would really help them get ready for college.

 

Mary

Edited by Mary in VA
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I think you should stop thinking about them as 11th graders. They are far behind in math and in science. Far enough behind that without a major overhaul, they won't be ready for college in 2012. Even in community college, you generally need to have Alg 1, Geometry, and Alg, 2 in order to not take remedial classes. You also need three sciences in most states for college but that is easier remedied with CC. However for CC chemistry, I agree with Pamela and I doubt the college would even let them take it next year. You have to pass a math test or score well enough on the ACT. I think the ACT score was something like a 25 in math (though maybe 23). It isn't an easy thing to get if the student is weak in math. Could you maybe just put them on a five year high school program?

Our local cc requires homeschool students to be in 11th grade or 16 yrs old. There is a placement test also -- if you take the ACT, you can opt out of the test as it needs to be a minimum of 19 in reading and 19 in math, for example. (But you may have to take the writing placement test.) They also will not allow the hser to take more than one class per semester. In 12th, they allow them to take 2 classes per semester. Most hsers are placed in college english or college algebra the first semester.

 

To the OP: There is no shame if your kids are not ready for college with lack of math and science. Every child is different. You just need to catch them up or work with them 'til 12th grade (graduation) and then see what options you have for college. I do agree with the poster who said your kids need more Algebra I to master the rigors of college chemistry. I would not do Physical Science or Astronomy -- skip it for something like Apologia Chemistry? -- to prepare for college Chemistry, at least. But master Algebra I first. HTH

Edited by tex-mex
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I was public schooled in NY. My junior year I took (for comparison's sake):

 

Regents English (we did MacBeth, Canterbury Tales, A Modest Proposal, and other stuff I can't remember. We did one Shakespeare play each year, so previously I'd done Romeo & Juliet and Julius Cesar. I mostly remember being bored, occasionally confused by my teacher's relating things to 3's Company, and trying to keep my friend Jessy awake).

 

Pre-Calculus (because I was accelerated in math: my peers were doing Trigonometry [basically - in NY at that time it was called "Course III" ]. I was required to take 3 years of math, I ended up with 5 because I took AP Calc my senior year)

 

Regents American History (9th and 10th grades are Global Studies, 12th is one semester each of Participation in Government and Economics)

 

Spanish 4

 

Regents Physics (again, accelerated schedule. my peers were doing Chemistry. Traditionally 9th was Earth Science, 10th was Biology, 11th Chemistry. For a Regents diploma you needed 3 years of science, but I electively took 4. I didn't take any my senior year because the only option was AP Biology and I'd had enough of dissection, tyvm).

 

Chorus

 

PE

 

Health (one semester)

 

*the accelerated schedule was something my school did for students who were above average in science and math (or just one). So, I took Regents Algebra (Course I) and Earth Science as an 8th grader (skipping traditional 8th grade science and math).

The Regents Diploma required also 4 years of English and Social Studies, 3 years of foreign language (unless it was Latin, in which case only 2 were required OR you could do 2 years of another foreign language AND 5 years of English and social studies), and an equivalent amount of PE (or maybe that was just a general state requirement for graduation, like health was).

 

 

Read up on your community college's requirements for admission. I know some of the systems around here allow you to enroll at 12, and that doesn't assume you've had high school coursework necessarily. I guess it depends on whether you're looking to get into a 100 level class or will be okay with the 000 level one.

 

If you're interested, here's a test (I found it online) for a remedial chem class at a local community college: http://www.gwc.maricopa.edu/home_pages/fergusson/chm090/090test1V2.html this is for CHM090 which is "A developmental course designed to review basic math and chemistry principles for students deficient or insecure in these areas. Stresses individualized instruction and "hands-on" experience. Serves to prepare the student for CHM130." (CHM 130 is Fundamental Chem). It made me realize how much I remember and what I've forgotten: I can't remember how to write something in scientific notation, for example.

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thing 2, what your dh really means when he says they are doing too much, is worth a look at, too. (given that the people who replied all think you are being reasonable.)

 

does he mean you are stressed out and he wishes you weren't? that the kids are grumpy and complaining to him? that his coworkers are bugging him about homeschooling? that he doesn't feel included? that they are working on the weekends when he'd like to be with them?

 

 

This. What is leading him to think you're going too far with their education? I'm not saying he's correct, but maybe he's got an issue that needs to be taken into consideration?

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I agree with what's been said that it's definitely not too much - especially for 11th grade which is notoriously the most work intensive. I think the main thing is to talk with your husband and ask him why he thinks it's too much. Are the kids complaining to him about the work load? Are there things he'd like to do' date=' but the schooling interferes with that? Or does he just base it on what school was like for him?

 

It sounds like you've got them on a good math program now, but I agree with others that it might not be a bad idea to consider them 10th grade and give them the extra time to get up to speed in math and science. I don't know your criteria for choosing curricula, but Apologia is very much self-teaching. Biology could easily be done by them even with them taking algebra I. Then they could go to chemistry next year, and if that's what they're most interested in, follow that up with a CC course in their senior year when they'll have finished algebra II and be working in Advanced Math.

 

Giving them an extra year could make the difference between having students who struggle in college, and those who will excel. :)[/quote']

 

They finished Biology last year with Potter's School...every module with teacher made tests that were rigorous, so now we need to finish physical science. We will complete it by December and we'll start Astronomy second semester and work into the summer. We got behind because my kids were doing German II and Latin I along with all their other subjects. I was also doing Latin roots. In hindsight, I should have dropped the latin roots and Latin I and stuck with physical science. My kids are good at languages and my daughter loves Latin so I focused more on what we enjoyed.

 

My son started school late and he'll be 18 in Jan., so I am not going to hold him back. I am setting them both up with a math tutor this week and they can work on math throughout the summer. I am going to enroll him in a community college next year. He's a very strong writer and loves history. He is also a strong reader. I struggled in math until I got to Alg. I and II and then I made A's and B's without a lot of effort. Somehow, it all came together when I could memorize equations and plug in numbers and solve for variables. It reminds me a little of putting sentences together in a foreign language. My daughter is definitely getting stronger and seems to enjoy Alg. I.

 

My husband gets a little frustrated when he needs my son to help him and I say he can't because he is behind. He thinks it must be the work load I give him though he knows that my son is ADD and doesn't stay focused. I just need to talk with him when we're both relaxed and I can more clearly articulate the fact that their school work is typical of others their age.

 

Thank you so much for your thoughts.

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I was public schooled in NY. My junior year I took (for comparison's sake):

 

Regents English (we did MacBeth, Canterbury Tales, A Modest Proposal, and other stuff I can't remember. We did one Shakespeare play each year, so previously I'd done Romeo & Juliet and Julius Cesar. I mostly remember being bored, occasionally confused by my teacher's relating things to 3's Company, and trying to keep my friend Jessy awake).

 

Pre-Calculus (because I was accelerated in math: my peers were doing Trigonometry [basically - in NY at that time it was called "Course III" ]. I was required to take 3 years of math, I ended up with 5 because I took AP Calc my senior year)

 

Regents American History (9th and 10th grades are Global Studies, 12th is one semester each of Participation in Government and Economics)

 

Spanish 4

 

Regents Physics (again, accelerated schedule. my peers were doing Chemistry. Traditionally 9th was Earth Science, 10th was Biology, 11th Chemistry. For a Regents diploma you needed 3 years of science, but I electively took 4. I didn't take any my senior year because the only option was AP Biology and I'd had enough of dissection, tyvm).

 

Chorus

 

PE

 

Health (one semester)

 

*the accelerated schedule was something my school did for students who were above average in science and math (or just one). So, I took Regents Algebra (Course I) and Earth Science as an 8th grader (skipping traditional 8th grade science and math).

The Regents Diploma required also 4 years of English and Social Studies, 3 years of foreign language (unless it was Latin, in which case only 2 were required OR you could do 2 years of another foreign language AND 5 years of English and social studies), and an equivalent amount of PE (or maybe that was just a general state requirement for graduation, like health was).

 

 

Read up on your community college's requirements for admission. I know some of the systems around here allow you to enroll at 12, and that doesn't assume you've had high school coursework necessarily. I guess it depends on whether you're looking to get into a 100 level class or will be okay with the 000 level one.

 

If you're interested, here's a test (I found it online) for a remedial chem class at a local community college: http://www.gwc.maricopa.edu/home_pages/fergusson/chm090/090test1V2.html this is for CHM090 which is "A developmental course designed to review basic math and chemistry principles for students deficient or insecure in these areas. Stresses individualized instruction and "hands-on" experience. Serves to prepare the student for CHM130." (CHM 130 is Fundamental Chem). It made me realize how much I remember and what I've forgotten: I can't remember how to write something in scientific notation, for example.

 

Wow, what an education!! I went to a decent high school and graduated in 1980. We didn't have a lot of choice, but thankfully I had some good teachers, especially for 12th gov't.

 

I will look at the website you suggested. I found a similiar one and copied it for them. I haven't shown it to them yet, but I'll bring it out so they realize what they should know in order to be ready for chemistry. I really feel that they need to work on just math with a tutor during the summer. I am thinking that my son should be tutored twice a week until he can do the lessons without help. I am not concerned about the $; I just want them to master each math lesson and be able to think through problems on their own without help.

 

When I took Alg. I and II, I had to just sit and work the problems out until I found the solution. My dad was gone a lot with the military and my mom is German. She learned math so many years ago and in another language therefore the directions just didn't click with her. If I could do it, so can they. It is going to take determination and hard work and there's nothing wrong with that.

 

By the way, thanks for your comments.:001_smile:

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This. What is leading him to think you're going too far with their education? I'm not saying he's correct, but maybe he's got an issue that needs to be taken into consideration?

 

He sometimes needs my son, but weekends are usually school free. I am distracted because I am doing a lot of reading to prepare for German, history and literature, and I'm also grading papers. I am rarely grumpy, it's not my disposition, but I am distracted. I get focused on the tasks ahead of me and its difficult to switch gears. Also, his irratation with school is not constant, just when he needs my son and he's busy with school. I am not very flexible when he needs him during school hours. Sometimes it would be better if I'd ask him how long the task will take instead of a rote response of, "no, he has school".

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How many hours per week of school are your kids doing?

 

Your husband did at least 6-8 hours per day, 5 days per week, plus projects, reading, homework, etc, right? Is what your children have to put in time wise unreasonable? or reasonable but hubby, like many people, not realizing "this still is school" and "you still ARE working." There are many such threads on this board.

 

Now, part of me says that with them behind, they should be doing extra. I've had friends who've put their kids in school and the school required the students to do night school, correspondence classes, etc on top of their normal school day and homework in order to catch up.

 

However, there is a limit. Obviously, they'll retain more if they are getting enough exercise, eating healthy, etc. Additionally, they will be healthier if they are doing meaningful work, chores, following interests, etc as well.

 

So if they *are* spending an unreasonable amount of time on schoolwork, I am most definitely going back to the fact that they may benefit from an additional year. I have since gone back and seen your other response. I definitely understand why you wouldn't want to hold ds back further. 19 to graduate is one thing; 20 is another.

 

If hubby is just not respecting your work and their schooling time, you'll have to set up healthy boundaries with him (and ideally help him understand why).

 

It sounds as if the work you are requiring of your children is pretty high quality. That will serve them well. It just may be that they have to put extra effort into the maths and sciences in order to have enough as at the end of this year, it looks as if they will have 2.5 science and a little more than one math. The science probably will work out with a science in 12th grade. Two high school maths at the end of 12th will not allow them to be competitive though. Three is iffy these days; but very few students, esp ones who are not math-strong, could finish Saxon's Adv Math in a year, especially after trying to accelerate Saxon's Algebra I and II.

 

I am NOT meaning to sound negative. I just want to be honest and upfront. We have to face what we're dealing with, not what we wish we were dealing with. As a parent with a student who is behind and not as strong as I would like, I know about that. And honestly, even my 18yo college junior has some deficiencies I wish we had worked out sooner.

Edited by 2J5M9K
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Wow, what an education!! I went to a decent high school and graduated in 1980. We didn't have a lot of choice, but thankfully I had some good teachers, especially for 12th gov't.

 

 

I included it mainly because aside from the math, I didn't think your schedule was that far off from a public school education (at least mine).

 

I don't know what you're doing for writing/composition, and again - I don't remember a lot of 11 grade English, but I know that by the end of school we had written different KINDS of essays (persuasive, expository, etc) and had done some oral reports. My senior year English class was "how to write a term paper" with instruction in note cards, outlining, topic paragraphs, notations, etc. Some of that had been covered before in other classes, but that was the main focus of that class. That would be another thing important for college: knowing how to set up a good multi-page paper - planning the progression of the writing, knowing how to cite and quote sources (and not plagiarize), knowing how to FIND relevant and current sources (and knowing that wikipedia alone is not a legitimate source), etc.

 

I'm going to add gently that if your kids haven't learned some good ADD coping strategies, now's the time to find some. The deadlines in college are going to be pretty firm, so work will either need to be done on a deadline or turned in incomplete. If your goal IS college for next year, working to firm deadlines would be another good skill for this year. Set them with an actual time (like a college class would be - the essay wouldn't be due on Tuesday, but rather "Tuesday at 10am") and adjust grading accordingly. It's okay to give a paper 2 grades: one for if it were handed in on time and one because it wasn't. Then you child knows the quality of the work and the cost of not focusing. And I understand they have ADD, but there's going to be a limit of how much a college professor is willing to listen to "I need 4 extra days for my paper because I have ADD and I won't be able to concentrate enough to get it done on time." KWIM?

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I have a son who is dysgraphic and a daughter. They are both in 11th grade. Also, they are both ADD, but my daughter does fairly well keeping on track this year. They both are in Algebra I/Saxon Math. She is about 15 lessons ahead of him.

 

They both are in German III and I use a German textbook-Komm Mit level 3. It is advanced, but I am going slowly and making them practice vocab. on a daily basis. I have 2 other students that come to my house once a week. They do partner work and I go over grammar. I give them the company quizzes and tests. I have a grade book and now I keep grades online with ClassBuilder.

 

I also teach medieval literature and we watch videos from the Teaching Company on medieval history. The instructor is a professor at the College of William & Mary. I do give them vocab. lists to help with comprehension and I stop the DVD so we can discuss the lecture. During the week they are given topics to study and I ask them to write a paragraph. Some examples are: What was the Council of Nycea? Who were the Vandals, Burgundians etc.,

 

For the literature class we read various books written during that time period such as, Beowulf, the morality play Everyman, Canterbury Tales.... I give them comprehension questions to answer. We read the book aloud and discuss the questions and they write down the answers.

 

For writing we do WriteShop. I am doing this with 2 other families. I basically teach the lesson and grade the paragraphs of the 7 kids taking the class.

 

We have had a hard time fitting science into our schedule. Last year they did Apologia Biology online with Potter's School. This semester I would like them to finish Apologia Physical Science which we didn't complete the previous year. I would then like to do Astronomy with them second semester. I got one of the books suggested by Susan Wise-Bauer in T W-T M.

 

It honestly sounds fine to me but it does look like you are doing a lot with two languages and the addition of other students, etc. But it looks good. I don't even think they are that behind. Good grief. So what if they are doing Algebra 1 now? You could do Math U See Geometry with them in the summer. I've heard it's a quick course. Some say it is more pre-Geometry but others on here use it for high school on its own. Then, in the fall you can have them do Algebra 2 or even start Algebra 2 in the summer while you do Geometry. That's three years of high school math.

 

Bravo to you for doing those languages with them on your own. That's fantastic and a lot of work for you.

 

You have accomplished a lot with your kids IMO, especially considering that you are dealing with things like dysgraphia and attention issues.

 

I honestly wouldn't even dream of making them homeschool an extra year. Your children really aren't that behind. My oldest homeschooling is in 8th grade but I do have a 21 yo in her fourth year of college. She wasn't homeschooled so I know exactly what kind of education many kids in school are getting. It's not always so great even if it looks good on paper. Some kids make it through all kinds of math in school and then still test into remedial math at college.

 

Also, if you do Astronomy this spring and finish that by summer's end, you'll have three years high school science done.

 

ETA: If they do end up in a remedial math class, it's not the end of the world anyway. As for science, you can do a fourth year of science for their senior year and then you'll have three or four years depending on whether you want to count the physical science. However, I think on the Apologia website, it does say you can count physical science as a high school course.

 

Best wishes!

Edited by Violet
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Are they finishing Apologia Physical Science? If so, I don't consider that a high school level science course. One boy did it in 7th and the other is doing it now as 8th. High school courses for Apologia are Biology, Chemistry or Physics. I also think they will be taking remedial college courses .

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I also teach medieval literature and we watch videos from the Teaching Company on medieval history. The instructor is a professor at the College of William & Mary. I do give them vocab. lists to help with comprehension and I stop the DVD so we can discuss the lecture. During the week they are given topics to study and I ask them to write a paragraph. Some examples are: What was the Council of Nycea? Who were the Vandals, Burgundians etc.,

 

For the literature class we read various books written during that time period such as, Beowulf, the morality play Everyman, Canterbury Tales.... I give them comprehension questions to answer. We read the book aloud and discuss the questions and they write down the answers.

 

I taught one year of High School at home and now I am a High School Teacher in a private school. I teach history and Language Arts.

 

I also use The Teaching Company materials as a supplement to our textbooks, so I am familiar with those.

 

I personally find the above content appropriate, but the assignments related to it are, IMO, from a lower grade level.

 

That, in combination with the math and science issue, makes me feel like you do not require too much.

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Is there any way to take a pretest for your college's chemistry class (or ideally, for English and math as well)? I think that is really the only way you will know if you are doing enough for your particular situation. Everyone here can only give their opinions, what they think is most likely to happen, based on the information given. If your son does test into chemistry next year, then I seriously doubt anyone here would say he shouldn't do it. They are just saying they don't think it is a realistic possibility. It seems to me that you have two options. One, you can continue the way you are going, and hope it is enough based on your understanding of your kid's needs (this is what most people do, when it comes down to it). Two, you can go to the college directly and ask what they will need to show your child can do the work. If there is not a pretest, maybe an accomodating instructor or two would let you have a course syllubus, or see some examples of work from the beginning of the term. I think this is the only way to really know if your goals are achievable. Either they are or they aren't, when it comes down to it. This is true of all of us. It is in each of our best interests to be honest with ourselves, regardless of what other people think of our curriculum plans. Please do know that nobody here wishes you ill will, or HOPES for whatever reason that your children will fail. People here tend to give their opinions because they wish the best for fellow homeschooling parents and their children. :)

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I'd say if you have OCD and you require too much of your high schoolers then you have come to the right place! :D I think many of the moms here would fit that description and this is why their children are so well accomplished!

 

If anything, you will probably be told here that your schedule is too lenient! :tongue_smilie:

Yes, I get that feeling. I haven't posted every single thing I've done, like 3 years of Latin, memorizing every one of Hamlet's lines when he was 12 and so forth, so to some it looks like too little is being studied. I don't want to kill their desire to learn and look up things on their own, but it could come to that if I become a task master.

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Yes, I get that feeling. I haven't posted every single thing I've done, like 3 years of Latin, memorizing every one of Hamlet's lines when he was 12 and so forth, so to some it looks like too little is being studied. I don't want to kill their desire to learn and look up things on their own, but it could come to that if I become a task master.

 

If you spend some time here you will see that there is a broad range of homeschoolers ranging from "very relaxed " to "draconian" (their own labels that they've put on themselves!). But you will also see that once it gets to high school that it no longer is just about following your educational heart but on meeting requirements for whatever goal you and your children have. People have seen first hand the disappointment that comes sometimes from people having a goal of something like college but not having met all the standards for that goal. Those standards are not set by us but by the colleges. So do your homework - asking those of us who have kids doing high school level work (me) or have graduated kids from high school (not me) is one part of that homework. As someone else mentioned, asking at the community college or your child's favorite college picks is another part of that homework.

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Is there any way to take a pretest for your college's chemistry class (or ideally, for English and math as well)? I think that is really the only way you will know if you are doing enough for your particular situation. Everyone here can only give their opinions, what they think is most likely to happen, based on the information given. If your son does test into chemistry next year, then I seriously doubt anyone here would say he shouldn't do it. They are just saying they don't think it is a realistic possibility. It seems to me that you have two options. One, you can continue the way you are going, and hope it is enough based on your understanding of your kid's needs (this is what most people do, when it comes down to it). Two, you can go to the college directly and ask what they will need to show your child can do the work. If there is not a pretest, maybe an accomodating instructor or two would let you have a course syllubus, or see some examples of work from the beginning of the term. I think this is the only way to really know if your goals are achievable. Either they are or they aren't, when it comes down to it. This is true of all of us. It is in each of our best interests to be honest with ourselves, regardless of what other people think of our curriculum plans. Please do know that nobody here wishes you ill will, or HOPES for whatever reason that your children will fail. People here tend to give their opinions because they wish the best for fellow homeschooling parents and their children. :)

 

I realize that. I printed out the math test that he will have to pass in order to take chemistry, so if doesn't pass it, he'll have to improve his math skills.

We aren't looking at college for next year. I've already decided that he'll take classes at the community college for a year and then go from there.

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If you spend some time here you will see that there is a broad range of homeschoolers ranging from "very relaxed " to "draconian" (their own labels that they've put on themselves!). But you will also see that once it gets to high school that it no longer is just about following your educational heart but on meeting requirements for whatever goal you and your children have. People have seen first hand the disappointment that comes sometimes from people having a goal of something like college but not having met all the standards for that goal. Those standards are not set by us but by the colleges. So do your homework - asking those of us who have kids doing high school level work (me) or have graduated kids from high school (not me) is one part of that homework. As someone else mentioned, asking at the community college or your child's favorite college picks is another part of that homework.

 

Thanks for the feedback. I have come that these conclusions as well. I'm in the midst of looking at classes at the community college as well as getting a math tutor. It's going to take time, but I feel confident that we will find what's right for him and rest in that.

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I included it mainly because aside from the math, I didn't think your schedule was that far off from a public school education (at least mine).

 

I don't know what you're doing for writing/composition, and again - I don't remember a lot of 11 grade English, but I know that by the end of school we had written different KINDS of essays (persuasive, expository, etc) and had done some oral reports. My senior year English class was "how to write a term paper" with instruction in note cards, outlining, topic paragraphs, notations, etc. Some of that had been covered before in other classes, but that was the main focus of that class. That would be another thing important for college: knowing how to set up a good multi-page paper - planning the progression of the writing, knowing how to cite and quote sources (and not plagiarize), knowing how to FIND relevant and current sources (and knowing that wikipedia alone is not a legitimate source), etc.

 

I'm going to add gently that if your kids haven't learned some good ADD coping strategies, now's the time to find some. The deadlines in college are going to be pretty firm, so work will either need to be done on a deadline or turned in incomplete. If your goal IS college for next year, working to firm deadlines would be another good skill for this year. Set them with an actual time (like a college class would be - the essay wouldn't be due on Tuesday, but rather "Tuesday at 10am") and adjust grading accordingly. It's okay to give a paper 2 grades: one for if it were handed in on time and one because it wasn't. Then you child knows the quality of the work and the cost of not focusing. And I understand they have ADD, but there's going to be a limit of how much a college professor is willing to listen to "I need 4 extra days for my paper because I have ADD and I won't be able to concentrate enough to get it done on time." KWIM?

 

I agree about the ADD. That is why I am doing a co-op and make them turn everything in on time along with the other kids. If it's late, I mark it down as such. And, I've told them that in college there are no excuses. If you don't hand something in, it's a zero and you'll flunk the class. I do not baby them as that would serve no purpose, if anything if would be a great injustice to them.

 

Thanks for the feedback.:)

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I am distracted because I am doing a lot of reading to prepare for German, history and literature, and I'm also grading papers. I am rarely grumpy, it's not my disposition, but I am distracted.

 

I noticed this when I read your posts:

With your students being in high school, you should not need to spend a lot of time preparing lessons because by that age, they should become independent learners and take charge of their own education. Can it be that your DH objects to you spending so much time preparing school?

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I agree about the ADD. That is why I am doing a co-op and make them turn everything in on time along with the other kids. If it's late, I mark it down as such. And, I've told them that in college there are no excuses. If you don't hand something in, it's a zero and you'll flunk the class. I do not baby them as that would serve no purpose, if anything if would be a great injustice to them.

 

Thanks for the feedback.:)

 

as one who is (a) a daughter of an ADD dad, (b) ADD myself, with © two of our four also ADD, i'd suggest you back up the coping with ADD strategies to much earlier in the process.

 

really.

 

so, regular schedule (sleep, eating, showering, etc). always.

exercise outdoors, 30 minutes a day, always

limited or no tv time.

 

and then, they may need to learn the cycle way of doing things. there is no way any of us in this house can do one thing for very long. but we can rotate through three things forever. so, fifteen minutes of math, make your bed, practice the piano for 15 minutes. then, 15 minutes of math, put your laundry in the washing machine, take out the garbage. 15 minutes of math, unload the dishwasher, get a drink.

 

if 15 minutes is too long, use a timer to see how quickly you can do 5 problems. repeat. the trick is to learn to refocus the attention after it has been lost. for some kids who haven't worked on it, that needs to happen every 3 minutes or so. at age 51, i can manage maybe 20 minutes at a time, with only 3 refocusings during that time. i have had a highly successful career, and almost forget that there is an issue at all BUT a few months ago i had to do a field of vision test that required me to look through an eye hole for 15 minutes. i was stark raving bonkers part way through. and had this sudden AHA moment.... oh yeah, i have trouble focusing on one thing for very long. sigh....

 

so failing them for not getting something in on time isn't going to help them so much as actually learning how to break each thing down into little bits, and then learning how to manage oneself in order to get the little bits done on schedule.

 

for dd who is 10, we are currently working on getting out of the house on time. so her preleaving time is broken down into tiny bits, and she moves from one thing to the next.... 3 minutes to brush teeth, 5 minutes for hair, etc, etc. she is at the point after several months of being able to tell me when she needs to start getting ready. thank goodness!

 

that got long, but i hope it helps.

ann

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I realize that. I printed out the math test that he will have to pass in order to take chemistry, so if doesn't pass it, he'll have to improve his math skills.

We aren't looking at college for next year. I've already decided that he'll take classes at the community college for a year and then go from there.

 

I was attempting to be encouraging, but I'm getting the impression that it didn't come across that way. :001_smile: I guess all I was really trying to say was that I hope you don't feel offended by what is being said, because that is just their opinion. You have the right to do things how you see fit, just like anyone else here. I'm sort of the sensitive type, so maybe I'm COMPLETELY projecting how I might feel onto you. If so, nevermind. :tongue_smilie:

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I guess all I was really trying to say was that I hope you don't feel offended by what is being said, because that is just their opinion. You have the right to do things how you see fit, just like anyone else here. I'm sort of the sensitive type, so maybe I'm COMPLETELY projecting how I might feel onto you. If so, nevermind.

 

I was a bit worried about that in this thread also. It's a tough first thread. No doubt the poster is probably not as nutty as I am though. And in the end, she'll decide to agree or disagree and move on. But *I* am so sensitive, it was worrying me though I think it's good that there were opinions on both sides so the OP can evaluate what fits her situation the best :)

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FWIW, my dd18 is in her senior year and will be 19 when she finishes her high school classes. The list of classes needed for the Georgia universities is specific in some subject areas and she is trying to complete them. I told her that she is technically a high schooler until she finishes her diploma requirements.

 

Does your state have specific graduation requirements? Can you look at a local high school schedule and show your DH that the classes you're doing are appropriate? I don't think your schedule is too much. It sounds similar to my ds14's freshman schedule.

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