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katilac

Who works in a job related to education? Let's talk!

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Homeschooling is complete, and I'm pondering whether to move towards or away from jobs related to education. If I think I'm going towards education, there are still so many routes to consider. I do have an offer for a part-time para job that would get me some experience and information. I've done plenty of tutoring and small group classes. 

So, what education jobs are represented here on the board? What do you love and hate? Pros and cons? Anything related: teacher, counselor, para, tutor, specialist, administrative, development, any level. I'll start below.

Tutoring can be decent pay and it's flexible. I'm having trouble getting excited about going at it full-tilt, maybe just because I'm tired after fourteen years of homeschooling and tutoring, lol. I'm thinking I'd like some colleagues after so long at home, but I don't see myself working for a tutoring center just for that (less convenient, lower pay). I would consider it if the experience would be a positive for other jobs, but I'm not sure it would be any more so than a para job or similar. Pretty easy to pick up clients. No additional training required, although I'd possibly go through Barton or another specialized training if I really got into it again. Anybody done special training? 

Small-classes are enjoyable for the most part, but I'm not sure I can make them pay. It was worthwhile when I was planning for my own kids anyway, but I would not do them now for the same money. To make more money, I'd have to cater to the richer side of town, which means finding a cheap location there. I have never attempted online for classes or tutoring. 

Counseling and testing is very intriguing, but requires a master's degree. 3 1/2 years and $30,000 is probably not realistic at my time of life. I would work a minimum of ten and probably more like fifteen years after that, but it's not amazing pay.  Still, I'd welcome any insight. It's possible I'd work longer, but I can't assume that.

Para/assistant in classroom does not pay that well, but I have an offer for part-time and I know could get full-time within a year. No additional schooling or expenses required. This particular job is at an amazing private school, and would likely lead to tutoring clients. That have money. I could eventually move to public for more pay, particularly if I brush up my Spanish, but still not a lot, and public is definitely harder. Still, if para experience opened other possibilities, it's something I'd consider. 

Classroom teacher would mean certification and school. You can start without certification here if they want you. Public pays a lot more than private, but again private is much easier here. I haven't explored this option much yet. 

Development and fundraising is something I have experience in, but not in educational circles. I wouldn't want to jump directly to it now, but it's something I'd be open to if I went into the private school world. This has room to grow and get higher pay once experienced. I haven't done it in so long I'm not sure if I would love it or hate it, lol, so I'd probably dip my toes in by helping out while at a different job. 

Other supports or specialties? 

If you left an education-related job, what did you move to?

 

 

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It will be area thing on a lot of this.  

I have friends in education and honestly, with all the stuff going on, they don’t encourage anyone into it especially at the public school level.  

For tutoring-  check and see how people are treating tutors in your area.  There has been an upswing in my area thinking tutors shouldn’t charge much especially to homeschoolers.  We just had another one asking for a cheap under 20 dollars an hour tutor for high school chem and algebra.  

Edited by itsheresomewhere
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I’m a certificated Social Studies teacher which means I’m pretty unemployable unless I want to go back to get more certifications. So I substitute teach.

Overall it’s pretty good. I only sub in middle and high schools because I would be a terrible elementary school teacher. My kids go to 3/4 of the schools I’m in so it’s fun to see them and have them stop by the room I’m in. And it makes school pickup easier. 😁

The pay is decent and usually the students are. It’s flexible which is really nice. I couldn’t raise a family on the pay but it’s enough to put some away for college or fun stuff. I work 3-4 days/week and never when my dh travels. 

Occasionally I’ll get an obnoxious class and have to get mean but more often than not the students get their work done and move on. I sub enough in one class that I know the kids when I see them around school. It’s good hear “Hi Mrs...” while wandering around or have them tell another kid, “oh that’s Mrs..., she’s nice.” I did have some kids recognize me while trick or treating which was a little unnerving. 

Really, I think it’s a good job for me at this time of life. I do hope for a “real” teaching job but for now subbing works.

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I teach science classes to homeschoolers.  I have a science center in a retail space near where I live, which is fairly centrally located for my area, near major highways.  We've just started but so far, so good.  We are pretty close to being able to cover expenses, and my prices are lower than some of the co-ops around here.

I have 7 years as a 4-H leader, a biology degree, an elementary education degree, and a marketing degree.  

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I teach small classes, and I tutor. 

I make about the same amount from each, and it's a better hourly rate than lots of jobs. 

I can't do a single other education job due to lack of credentials; even though I'm multi degreed in related fields, and have been teaching/tutoring for more than a decade, I'd need to pay more $$$ to get a basic starter cert.

I am picky about students and classes, and that means I am not making as much as I need to. Ugh.

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I just got a part-time job as a reading tutor in a local public school, and I love it!  My background is linguistics, so teaching young children how to read is so rewarding and fun!  My ds is a freshman in college this year and my dd is doing WHA full-time, basically, so this job is perfect as I work M-Th and have Fridays off in which I can proctor her tests and get laundry done.  Going to a job interview for the first time in 20 years was more than a bit unnerving, I must say, but I am so thankful that I found a purpose so I do not have to pursue my second option as a WalMart greeter, lol!

For you, though, it sounds like the para/assistant in that private school that offers potential tutoring jobs on the side might be a happy, good fit!

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17 minutes ago, Omma said:

I just got a part-time job as a reading tutor in a local public school, and I love it!  My background is linguistics, so teaching young children how to read is so rewarding and fun!  My ds is a freshman in college this year and my dd is doing WHA full-time, basically, so this job is perfect as I work M-Th and have Fridays off in which I can proctor her tests and get laundry done.  Going to a job interview for the first time in 20 years was more than a bit unnerving, I must say, but I am so thankful that I found a purpose so I do not have to pursue my second option as a WalMart greeter, lol!

For you, though, it sounds like the para/assistant in that private school that offers potential tutoring jobs on the side might be a happy, good fit!

 

I would love this job, but I would need a Masters to work in reading in the school!  Our schools are nuts.

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I have a special Ed degree in cognitive impairments and emotional impairments K-12 and a major in psychology.  I substitute teach at the regional school for the severely impaired ages 3-26.  It is $90 for teacher or $75/day for aide.  I love the job and flexibility but the pay is not great at all.

This fall I added a home bound student and that pays $32/hour for 2 one hour sessions a week plus meetings, IEP, consults, etc plus they give me mileage.  I would love to pick up 1-2 more home bound students as I love it and the pay is better.

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5 hours ago, itsheresomewhere said:

For tutoring-  check and see how people are treating tutors in your area.  There has been an upswing in my area thinking tutors shouldn’t charge much especially to homeschoolers.  We just had another one asking for a cheap under 20 dollars an hour tutor for high school chem and algebra.  

 

I already know this, I've been pretty active. High school science and math are $35 per session here, more if you go to the ritzy side of town. Sometimes a lot more, but alas that is not my specialty. A session is NOT an hour, it is 45 minutes at most. Other subjects and levels are still pretty good, and if you can get some small groups going, you're golden. The idea of fully focusing on it is not jazzing me up, though, lol. 

4 hours ago, felicity said:

I’m a certificated Social Studies teacher which means I’m pretty unemployable unless I want to go back to get more certifications. So I substitute teach.

 

Is that because a lot of people have that degree, or it's just not in demand, or . . . ?? Does that encompass history? 

34 minutes ago, Where's Toto? said:

I teach science classes to homeschoolers.  I have a science center in a retail space near where I live, which is fairly centrally located for my area, near major highways.  We've just started but so far, so good.  We are pretty close to being able to cover expenses, and my prices are lower than some of the co-ops around here.

I have 7 years as a 4-H leader, a biology degree, an elementary education degree, and a marketing degree.  

 

That sounds very cool! Do you think you might do enrichment classes for schooled kids in the future? 

16 minutes ago, Omma said:

I just got a part-time job as a reading tutor in a local public school, and I love it!  My background is linguistics, so teaching young children how to read is so rewarding and fun!  My ds is a freshman in college this year and my dd is doing WHA full-time, basically, so this job is perfect as I work M-Th and have Fridays off in which I can proctor her tests and get laundry done.  Going to a job interview for the first time in 20 years was more than a bit unnerving, I must say, but I am so thankful that I found a purpose so I do not have to pursue my second option as a WalMart greeter, lol!

 

Congrats! Fridays off is awfully nice. 

Job interviews are the worst. One reason I like this school a lot is because their interview was practical and straightforward. They didn't hold back information, they didn't ask weirdly specific questions and expect me to have an anecdote ready for each of them (have you ever been in a situation where a co-worker got hit by a bus on their lunch break? how did you respond? I swear that's what all the questions are starting to sound like). 

Walmart greeter 😂 I think I'd rather an unruly classroom

25 minutes ago, StellaM said:

I can't do a single other education job due to lack of credentials; even though I'm multi degreed in related fields, and have been teaching/tutoring for more than a decade, I'd need to pay more $$$ to get a basic starter cert.

I am picky about students and classes, and that means I am not making as much as I need to. Ugh.

 

There are jobs in my district that you can't get without a cert, and some you can start in and then work towards your cert, so that is helpful. 

I just told dh he has to keep his job so I can continue being picky.

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24 minutes ago, Ottakee said:

I have a special Ed degree in cognitive impairments and emotional impairments K-12 and a major in psychology.  I substitute teach at the regional school for the severely impaired ages 3-26.  It is $90 for teacher or $75/day for aide.  I love the job and flexibility but the pay is not great at all.

This fall I added a home bound student and that pays $32/hour for 2 one hour sessions a week plus meetings, IEP, consults, etc plus they give me mileage.  I would love to pick up 1-2 more home bound students as I love it and the pay is better.

 

Ouch, that's a rough pay level. You can get a regular para job here that pays more than that (no degree required) and then special ed pays more. I'm not sure about para sub pay, maybe that's lower? If you speak Spanish, you can get a para job here instantly, there's an ongoing shortage. 

Now the home bound gig sounds much better, I hope you pick up more students! Do they usually have some homebound students, and you get them based on seniority? Because that's worth a bit of a wait for sure. 

Does your psychology major enable you to administer various educational tests? 

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1 hour ago, katilac said:

 

That sounds very cool! Do you think you might do enrichment classes for schooled kids in the future? 

 

I do some workshops that could count as 'afterschool' and a couple Saturdays.  Plus Summer camps.   I've been thinking a lot about how to market to public schooled kids when "homeschool" is in my name. Haven't really come up with anything. 😕

 

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I have done a variety of public school teaching jobs. My most recent teaching job was as an elemtart teacher at an online charter school. I have been out of the traditional classroom for over 10 years, but I have burned out on teaching.

I pulled the plug this spring and resigned from my job. 

This summer and early fall I worked a seasonal job processing academic documentation for students who are applying to enroll with the online school company. I really like that job. It required sitting in front of a computer for many hours per day just working away looking at documents. I know it would drive many people crazy, but I am quite introverted, and it was perfect for me. If additional documentation was need from families, it was requested by email. The email responses from parents went to a different section of the department to be dealt with. I had 0 direct contact with students and parents. The base hourly pay was not super great, but there was plenty of overtime available during the really busy periods and an extra incentive program for working a set minimum hours of overtime. 

I am now working a substitute for the same online school provider. I Ike the extra flexibility that working as a sub provides even though I could make more money as permanent teacher. I have no plans to go back to regular, full time teaching.

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12 minutes ago, Where's Toto? said:

I do some workshops that could count as 'afterschool' and a couple Saturdays.  Plus Summer camps.   I've been thinking a lot about how to market to public schooled kids when "homeschool" is in my name. Haven't really come up with anything. 😕

 

 

The schools in my area pay money for people to come in and do presentations and stuff. Pretty good money, too. That might be an option that would pay for itself plus get your name in front of a lot of school people (always have a handout for the kids!). You could also donate entry to a class for the school to raffle off or use as a prize, or donate an entry to almost any non-profit to use as a prize.  

Can you riff on the original name or have a secondary name just for marketing to schools? Like use Toto's Terrific Lab instead of Toto's Terrific Homeschooling Lab? The name you market with doesn't even need to be that similar, just have the marketing name, then the full name and same contact info, somewhere on the paperwork. For example, my official company name was something like Homeschool Educational Enrichment, but I would also market under Totally Terrific Tutoring (I mean, not really, that's awful, but you get the idea) and Really Good Writing Services <<< and that one had nothing at all to do with homeschooling, but I wasn't filing another business name. 

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I've been tutoring and teaching small groups.  I really like that.  I substitute taught in the PS a while back, and the pay was ridiculous - $70/day and this is a super high COL area.  Math and science tutors around here can make more than that an hour.   Sadly, I am not a math or science tutor - I was more than fine for homeschooling, but to command those rarefied prices I'd need more of a specialty pedigree.  I'm focusing on foreign languages (Spanish and German) and English.  Right now I'm teaching all local homeschoolers, but after youngest dd leaves for college next fall, I've been considering maybe trying to offer some online classes and/or advertise tutoring to the ps students.  One of my homeschool classes has ended up with one online session a week (and one IRL), so I'm starting to get the hang of some of the online options.

I sometimes think I should've trained in Speech Language Pathology - and I've heard they need ones who are bilingual.  But somehow that career option didn't even occur to me till years later.  In my mid-fifties now, pretty much no graduate degree will pay itself off, so the quite reasonable options in front of me will have to do.  I am partway done with getting a certification from ReadAmerica (Phonographix) to teach reading - I already know the program very well as I used it with my kids.  Just need to sit down and finish typing stuff in. 

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47 minutes ago, katilac said:

 

The schools in my area pay money for people to come in and do presentations and stuff. Pretty good money, too. That might be an option that would pay for itself plus get your name in front of a lot of school people (always have a handout for the kids!). You could also donate entry to a class for the school to raffle off or use as a prize, or donate an entry to almost any non-profit to use as a prize.  

Can you riff on the original name or have a secondary name just for marketing to schools? Like use Toto's Terrific Lab instead of Toto's Terrific Homeschooling Lab? The name you market with doesn't even need to be that similar, just have the marketing name, then the full name and same contact info, somewhere on the paperwork. For example, my official company name was something like Homeschool Educational Enrichment, but I would also market under Totally Terrific Tutoring (I mean, not really, that's awful, but you get the idea) and Really Good Writing Services <<< and that one had nothing at all to do with homeschooling, but I wasn't filing another business name. 

I could definitely do the name thing very easily, although my sign says "---------Homeschool Science Center" so I wasn't sure if that would be weird.   I definitely have a habit of overthinking things.

I have thought about doing a donation to tricky trays offering a free workshop or discount on a party, along with some science toys.  We also may be a sponsor at our 4-H Fair next year (since I'm also a 4-H leader) but weren't ready to do it this year.

A local town also does a street festival in early June that I might do a table at.  We almost did this year but we were still looking for a space to rent and thought it wouldn't be as useful without an actual location.

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I taught high school math 25+ years ago. As I began to think about my post-homeschool career last year, I took classes to renew my teaching credential and got a job as a substitute. I had a much easier time finding Educational Assistant jobs that fit my kids' school schedules rather than certified (teaching) sub jobs, so that was what I usually did. I spent about half the year as a long-term sub in an EA position helping out in a kindergarten class for 3.5 hours per day. I liked that a lot but the pay was lousy ($11/hr, $12 when I became long term). I realized that a regular position would fit my schedule much better (I need to schedule care for my disabled dd and that's not really possible if work/hours vary). I am now an EA helping out in math classrooms in my dd's high school. I make a few more dollars per hour and I'm working 6.5 hours/day, but the pay is still less than half what I would make teaching. BUT...I don't know if I could handle the stress and out-of-class work of a full-time teacher. There are several teachers that I work with that are just stretched so thin. Their prep time is taken up with IEP meetings and lots of other stuff I never dealt with 25 years ago. One teacher had to meet a student's lawyer before she met the student! Mom said, "You'll never hear a word from me as long as my child gets an A or B." EAs do not have to deal with that! So I think I have a much healthier stress level and work load. But I do love teaching and will look next spring at what is available. My ideal position would be a part-time teaching position at this school.

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Ali in OR.....THAT is exactly why I am not sure I want to go back and get my certification renewed.  I have 7 more years to get a nice retirement as I am in the old old old system (1989) but I don't want all the IEP stress, etc.  I love the TEACHING of the students though.

What I would LOVE to do is be sort of an educational/medical care manager......coordinating with social services, medical services, the school, etc.

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3 hours ago, katilac said:

 

Is that because a lot of people have that degree, or it's just not in demand, or . . . ?? Does that encompass history? 

 

That’s a good question. It does encompass history—basically any social sciences. My undergrad focused on European history and politics so I’m qualified to teach that, American History, government, those kinds of subjects. I wouldn’t go out and teach psychology though. 

I have a couple of ideas about why there are no jobs. In most states History/Social Studies isn’t a tested subject so there is less stress about teaching specific things. Also, while history is important and teaches skills, it’s not a skill like writing, math, or science. Most people don’t go up and say, “I’m a good historian” like they might with writing or math. It’s more “squishy” if that makes any sense. So people think they want to be a teacher but math is hard, science is intimidating, and English is scary...History is left. 

But those are just my opinions. I’m sure someone out there has studied it. I just know that when I look for jobs there are lots of science, math, and especially Special Ed. There are always a few English and very rarely anything I’m qualified for. 

So I sub and hope to make the connections that will lead to a full-time job. In the meantime I enjoy working when it fits into my schedule. For instance, I didn’t work today because no interesting jobs came up and my parents are coming tomorrow (needed to clean the house). But I am subbing in a history class tomorrow, so that should be fun.

Hope something here made sense and was helpful. 

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3 hours ago, Ottakee said:

I have a special Ed degree in cognitive impairments and emotional impairments K-12 and a major in psychology.  I substitute teach at the regional school for the severely impaired ages 3-26.  It is $90 for teacher or $75/day for aide.  I love the job and flexibility but the pay is not great at all.

This fall I added a home bound student and that pays $32/hour for 2 one hour sessions a week plus meetings, IEP, consults, etc plus they give me mileage.  I would love to pick up 1-2 more home bound students as I love it and the pay is better.

If you were here you’d be getting bonuses and roses strewn at your feet. The school districts around here are desperate for SpEd teachers. 

Our rates are somewhat higher which is good. We also get bumps at our 20th and 40th days working. I think aides get an hourly wage that’s equivalent to subs but I’m not sure—it’s not something I’ve looked into doing.

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My college degree is in engineering. I homeschooled all three of my children through high school with my youngest graduating this last June. In January of this year I decided that I wanted to substitute teach or teach small classes in the homeschool community.  Our local public schools pay subs $100/day. A lady that I had co-taught a co-op class with taught at a local catholic high school, I met with her to go over how to word my co-op classes on my resume. She asked me to apply for a job opening at her school in her department. I did and was hired a few weeks later to fill a different position at the school. 

In August I began my first year teaching high school physics and engineering at a catholic high school.  I teach 143 students each day in five physics classes and one project lead the way engineering class.  I love my job. I love my co-workers. The kids are great. They are polite and bright and kind. It is also very challenging. I spend a lot of time planning and have a lot to learn all the time. I do need to earn a certificate. I can choose to get a state certificate or a Catholic schools certificate. The catholic schools certificate requires fewer hours so that is my current plan.

the most challenging aspect of my job has been that most of my students aren’t reall that interested in learning. They want to do the minimum required to get a good grade. I had a problem at the beginning of the year with a large group cheating on a homework assignment. Many that I caught were apologetic but all said that they figured it was better to cheat than to turn in an incomplete homework assignment. Dealing with the lack of intellectual curiosity has been emotionally challenging for me. I want to teach and I want them to be excited to learn.  

The family adjustment to having me at work rather than at hone has been better than I expected. I still cook dinner most nights but my husband has taken over laundry. It is harder to shop on weekends and sad that I cannot just hop in the car next Friday morning to pick up my son from college for thanksgiving break. We are having to arrange a car pool.

i see myself being in this job for quite some time. I am 46 and really do enjoy teaching. I do not see myself in the public schools. I make $47,700 each year.  I do not regret homeschooling my children through high school and if I had another child I would do it again, but I am where I was meant to be right now. I never even considered teaching when I was growing up but I love it now.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, felicity said:

If you were here you’d be getting bonuses and roses strewn at your feet. The school districts around here are desperate for SpEd teachers. 

Our rates are somewhat higher which is good. We also get bumps at our 20th and 40th days working. I think aides get an hourly wage that’s equivalent to subs but I’m not sure—it’s not something I’ve looked into doing.

The need here is very high and I can work every day that I want, just no bonuses, etc.  And we work HARD.  All special Ed is difficult but the students I work with are mostly non ambulatory and require 2-3 person lifts/transfers many times a day, students with trachs, feeding tubes, most wearing incontinence briefs, non verbal, some with oxygen, many with seizures, almost all with special braces/splints, etc.  Many days we don't get a lunch break at all, there are no recesses, we go with the students to gym, etc, no planning time breaks, etc.

I think we need to get paid way more than we do.  I love it but I can't live on the pay long term.

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1 hour ago, Ottakee said:

The need here is very high and I can work every day that I want, just no bonuses, etc.  And we work HARD.  All special Ed is difficult but the students I work with are mostly non ambulatory and require 2-3 person lifts/transfers many times a day, students with trachs, feeding tubes, most wearing incontinence briefs, non verbal, some with oxygen, many with seizures, almost all with special braces/splints, etc.  Many days we don't get a lunch break at all, there are no recesses, we go with the students to gym, etc, no planning time breaks, etc.

I think we need to get paid way more than we do.  I love it but I can't live on the pay long term.

You do. The class next to the one I'm in most often is the non-ambulatory kids that need the most help. It's amazing what those teachers and subs do. They deserve every bonus they can get! And more pay on a day-to-day basis.

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3 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

Right now I'm teaching all local homeschoolers, but after youngest dd leaves for college next fall, I've been considering maybe trying to offer some online classes and/or advertise tutoring to the ps students.   

 

You might think about small group tutoring for languages. You can charge less per student, so parents like it, but it's several students so you wind up making more money per hour and the students still get lots of attention and practice. 

2 hours ago, Where's Toto? said:

I could definitely do the name thing very easily, although my sign says "---------Homeschool Science Center" so I wasn't sure if that would be weird.   

 

Yes, have the 'public school' name prominent on that targeted advertising, but it can still say "Classes held at the -------- Homeschool Science Center." You note it again when you send their confirmation, and have a sign you can put in the window or on the door when holding those classes. Election style signs look good and are pretty cheap even in color. People won't think twice about it. When I had a storefront, I had a couple of people come in and do classes, and that's what they did. Advertised under their own name/business, which wasn't related to me at all, and just noted where this particular class was being held. 

1 hour ago, felicity said:

I have a couple of ideas about why there are no jobs. In most states History/Social Studies isn’t a tested subject so there is less stress about teaching specific things. Also, while history is important and teaches skills, it’s not a skill like writing, math, or science. Most people don’t go up and say, “I’m a good historian” like they might with writing or math. It’s more “squishy” if that makes any sense.  

 

I do think there is that perception. I strongly disagree when people undervalue it as a subject, but I agree it's common. 

My dd was chatting with her Uber driver, who teaches at the high school there. He said they change the government teacher every year, not because teachers leave but just because they rotate it for some reason. You might teach it every fourth year so no one feels prepared or really gets into a rhythm of teaching it. 

And there's a scene in the Netflix show Atypical where the track team scores a big win. The coach, who is also the history teacher, cheers excitedly, 'Yes, yes, I am good at my job! Not the teaching history part, but this, yes!' 

I laughed pretty hard at that because almost every coach at my high school was indeed also a history teacher. Apparently that's still a thing. I'm sure it's less funny if you're a person who would actually like to teach history full-time and not coach track or baseball. 

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9 hours ago, katilac said:

Yes, have the 'public school' name prominent on that targeted advertising, but it can still say "Classes held at the -------- Homeschool Science Center." You note it again when you send their confirmation, and have a sign you can put in the window or on the door when holding those classes. Election style signs look good and are pretty cheap even in color. People won't think twice about it. When I had a storefront, I had a couple of people come in and do classes, and that's what they did. Advertised under their own name/business, which wasn't related to me at all, and just noted where this particular class was being held. 

You are really helping me think this out here, so I'm going to continue picking your brain if that's okay.  😀

Would you go with a completely different "public school" name so it really distinguishes it as a separate thing (and from what you said before you wouldn't feel the need to register a second name) or would you keep it simple and just take out the Homeschool part of it?  I'm a little worried about that because then it is a super generic name.  Like literally 'general area of the state' science center.    I might be able to do a narrower regional name, not town but an old name for the area that covers a few towns including the one I'm in.

I also do my 4-H club there so could do a tagline that the "------- Homeschool Science Center" is home to the "xxxx public school science stuff" and the "xxxxx 4-H club".

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17 hours ago, StellaM said:

 

I would love this job, but I would need a Masters to work in reading in the school!  Our schools are nuts.

Yeah, I actually do have an MA in Linguistics (from back in the late '80's)...although I think I only snagged the interview because of having a friend in the school system that put in a good name for me!

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3 hours ago, Where's Toto? said:

You are really helping me think this out here, so I'm going to continue picking your brain if that's okay.  😀

Would you go with a completely different "public school" name so it really distinguishes it as a separate thing (and from what you said before you wouldn't feel the need to register a second name) or would you keep it simple and just take out the Homeschool part of it?  I'm a little worried about that because then it is a super generic name.  Like literally 'general area of the state' science center.    I might be able to do a narrower regional name, not town but an old name for the area that covers a few towns including the one I'm in.

I also do my 4-H club there so could do a tagline that the "------- Homeschool Science Center" is home to the "xxxx public school science stuff" and the "xxxxx 4-H club".

 

 Unless you come up with something that is absolutely on point and memorable, I think you are better off just taking out 'homeschool' even if the result is super generic. I went with something that sounded good and expressed my approach to learning, but you know what? I should have kept it much simpler and more obvious. 99% of people did not care one bit what my approach was, they just wanted tutoring or a class or curriculum and the name didn't make it obvious that I offered any of that. Anyone in my homeschooling circle knew, but I missed out on broader circles for sure. In hindsight, even something super generic like Metro Area Tutoring or I'm a Great Tutor would have been better. My homeschooling circle would still have known, and 'tutoring' would have pulled in more people from both other homeschool circles and public schools. So, yeah, I will also be having a marketing name pretty soon. 

I would lean against narrowing down the region in the name. If you're Southeast State Homeschool Science Center, I'd probably just go with Southeast State Science Center. I feel like science center is the important bit and people will look to see exactly where it is. And I have found that schools and clubs and even individuals will travel fairly far for one-shot classes or events. 

Do you do "badge packages" for Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts? That's a thing around here. Each scout pays x amount of money to complete a series of activities that lead to one or more badges. Not individually but as a troop. They come in with their leader and at the end of the afternoon they have Badges X, Y, and Z. 

Edited to add that the tagline idea is great! 

 

Edited by katilac
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I have a friend who teaches a science class to home school high school students- I am not positive of what she charges but she has done well with it.  She is not certified but just loves Biology so she makes it relevant to our area and families and students love that!  If you can create an in-person class that most families prefer to not teach and/or make it locally-based that could be an idea as well?

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