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retiredHSmom

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Everything posted by retiredHSmom

  1. Virginia Military Institute has an Arabic language program
  2. You are not overthinking this. Do not comment on a person's weight...ever. I have a daughter with anorexia, I can't tell you how much it triggers her when people comment on her weight (usually complimentary) because while Americans think thinner is better it is not true and she actually needs to and is gaining weight and it kills her when people mention her weight because she worries that if she looks great now she will look bad when she reaches the weight that her doctor and dietician have decided is healthy for her.
  3. Do not listen to a single person here. They do not have any training in eating disorders or recovery. My daughter is back in treatment for her third relapse for anorexia. Her dietician has her eating 2800 calories per day and she is still increasing her. Due to restricting during the day, it is not at all unusual for my daughter to eat 500-1000 of that after dinner. It is not binging. Years of restricting really messes up your endocrine system. My daughter struggles with blood sugar regulation right now and frequently shakes uncontrollably from low blood sugar when she needs to eat (and she eats every two hours). Cutting carbs etc, as recommended above is all bad advice. You need a dietician and a good therapist. Both need to be experienced with eating disorders. The people that are do not take insurance. I file for out-of-network benefits. My daughter sees her therapist twice a week and her dietician once. It costs a lot of money but when we tried to use in-network before they really didn't know what they were doing and her we are again, in relapse.
  4. Thank You everyone for your thoughts. To answer a few questions: I began the year teaching much the same way I homeschooled. No homework was graded. I only teach 1 lesson out of 7, the rest of the days are collaborative work; concept and math development exercises; virtual labs; full-blown fancy lab equipment labs; demonstrations etc. Tests were open-note to encourage them to learn to take good notes. The first problem that I ran in to was that nothing got accomplished that wasn't graded. The first thing that I heard every time I introduced a concept or handed out a page was "how many points is this worth?" Then if I said none, nothing got done. They would chat with each other, stare in to space, do homework for other classes. In frustration, I began grading everything. The one day that I "lecture" and introduce the new concepts and equations in the chapter, the kids would literally sleep through the class. No one paid any attention at all. I started giving them a multiple choice quiz on the lecture immediately after the lecture. They knew it was coming, no one paid attention. I have about 4 students per class that get A's, 8 that fail and a bunch in the middle. I also have 33 out of 135 students on IEPs (primarily for ADD) that require that I give them class notes, so I started using the power points provided by the textbook (Conceptual Physics, by Paul Hewitt). Then students were showing up for the test with printouts of the slides. They weren't studying, just sitting there and searching their notes for the answers. So tests became closed-book, no notes. I would have the students solve problems in class, and then I would provide the answers on the board immediately and walk through the solutions so that they would understand and they would sit there and do nothing until I gave the answer. I am a big fan of collaborative learning, the day after I introduced a new chapter, I gave them a concept development worksheet by the publisher to complete in groups in class. My class looked like a commercial for collaborative learning, students working in small groups, talking about physics. I collected the sheets to spot check them, every single one was wrong. They taught each other the wrong answers, And here I am. I still believe in providing quick feedback so that they know whether or not they understand what I am teaching, I grade work for 2-3 hours every night. I have quit reading and sewing because I am grading. The cheating is as bad as ever and if they were learning the material, I could probably reach a zen state about it, but their test scores just keep falling. We just finished momentum and the average test score was 12/30. Two of the test problems they needed to solve were on their homework, word-for-word. This is the second test I have done that on. No one even noticed. Many students got the homework question right and then failed the test questions. They really believe that after a chapter is done they should never need to see the information again. I had a revolt when work, energy and power questions )our current chapter) required them to use the momentum equation from last chapter. And this is why I am frustrated and exhausted. I don't spend my life trying to catch cheating, it is so obvious that I can't avoid seeing it. My administration is good about letting us run our classes. I do not have to use specific tests or anything like that. I do need to use the Conceptual Physics textbook but I like the text. I think that I am going to go with Regentrude and Pippen's suggestion and go back to ungraded homework, with a quiz each unit with questions directly from the homework. The quiz grade will count as their homework grade.
  5. I do make my own materials pretty regularly but as a first-time teacher it can be time consuming and overwhelming so using some of the publisher produced materials helps. Physics is required for graduation. I think my biggest frustration has to do with that fact that they do not understand what they are doing. (The test average on the last test was 13/30) but they persist in cheating rather than learning the material.
  6. I can turn them in to the honor council (their decision is a recommendation, I can do what I will to punish the transgression) and I do every time. I am just overwhelmed though with the frequency.
  7. Help! I graduated my youngest from high school in June and started a teaching job in August. I teach physics at a parochial school in the metro area of a large city. I teach 135 regular students each day, no honors or AP and the cheating is going to send me over the edge. In September I caught 60 of my students cheating on a homework assignment by copying the answers from a website. The answers on the website were wrong, so I caught them. The next week one student cheated on an extra-credit assignment. It was a video with a question at the end. The student copied the answer from the comments section on the video on another website (I had embedded the video on my class website) Then I had quite a few copy the homework answers from each other. Last week one student took a picture of another students work right in front of me. Then, tonight, I am grading an assignment that was completed in class, and 12 out of 18 copied the answers directly out of an online copy of the answer key. 2 definitely didn't cheat and 4 probably did but they were smart enough to change their wording. I am frustrated and tired. I am seriously considering collecting all their phones on Monday and then passing out a copy of the worksheet and having them complete it as test grade. Any ideas on how to stop them from cheating or reaching a zen state where I just don't care?
  8. My college degree is in engineering. I homeschooled all three of my children through high school with my youngest graduating this last June. In January of this year I decided that I wanted to substitute teach or teach small classes in the homeschool community. Our local public schools pay subs $100/day. A lady that I had co-taught a co-op class with taught at a local catholic high school, I met with her to go over how to word my co-op classes on my resume. She asked me to apply for a job opening at her school in her department. I did and was hired a few weeks later to fill a different position at the school. In August I began my first year teaching high school physics and engineering at a catholic high school. I teach 143 students each day in five physics classes and one project lead the way engineering class. I love my job. I love my co-workers. The kids are great. They are polite and bright and kind. It is also very challenging. I spend a lot of time planning and have a lot to learn all the time. I do need to earn a certificate. I can choose to get a state certificate or a Catholic schools certificate. The catholic schools certificate requires fewer hours so that is my current plan. the most challenging aspect of my job has been that most of my students aren’t reall that interested in learning. They want to do the minimum required to get a good grade. I had a problem at the beginning of the year with a large group cheating on a homework assignment. Many that I caught were apologetic but all said that they figured it was better to cheat than to turn in an incomplete homework assignment. Dealing with the lack of intellectual curiosity has been emotionally challenging for me. I want to teach and I want them to be excited to learn. The family adjustment to having me at work rather than at hone has been better than I expected. I still cook dinner most nights but my husband has taken over laundry. It is harder to shop on weekends and sad that I cannot just hop in the car next Friday morning to pick up my son from college for thanksgiving break. We are having to arrange a car pool. i see myself being in this job for quite some time. I am 46 and really do enjoy teaching. I do not see myself in the public schools. I make $47,700 each year. I do not regret homeschooling my children through high school and if I had another child I would do it again, but I am where I was meant to be right now. I never even considered teaching when I was growing up but I love it now.
  9. Our doctor wanted genetic testing for medicine decisions. She used a company called genomind. The company filed with our insurance (who doesn't cover genetic testing) and then appealed their refusal for the maximum number of appeals and when it still wasn't covered they gave us a "scholarship" that covered all but $300. They believe that all patients should have access to genetic testing for health reasons.
  10. I love learning to make new things. I have made: shampoo bars (didn't like them, I have curly hair and it is very picky) lye soap (fun to make and not really that hard to do) bath bombs (lots of fun to make and use) herbal salve (a favorite with everyone. Everyone I give it to, wants more) Bath tea (a great gift) homemade salt scrub Willow and Sage magazine has great recipes for bath and beauty products and is beautiful homemade cheese (I have never been successful with mozzarella but I make paneer and ricotta regularly) cultured butter (delicious) I make my own cultured buttermilk all the time italian sausage and breakfast sausage beef jerky cocktail cherries (homemade maraschino cherries, like luxardo cherries but a lot less expensive) vanilla raspberry cordial ( the recipe said raspberry micronutrients, and I realized about two steps in that I was making alcohol, its delicious) homemade lysol wipes laundry detergent (we have hard water and it just didn't work as well as Tide) I can my own jam, applesauce and canned peach slices most years I have canned cherry pie filling, chicken, beans (pinto and garbanzo), diced tomatoes, spaghetti sauce and green beans one or more times. I make and can my own chicken broth periodically I know there are other things. Like I said, I love to try new things
  11. Last week I was at training for my new teaching job (post homeschool career) and was surprised to discover, in my small sample of engineering and technology teachers, that the primary cook in all of their families except mine was the husband. My brother and his wife both work full-time and he does all the cooking and frankly most of the childcare (and I am not criticizing my SIL, I really like her) Who does 75% or more of the dinner cooking at your house?
  12. The book A Can, A Man and a Microwave is full of microwave recipes that were featured in the magazine, Men's Health over the years. My husband has used them many times while deployed or on military business travel in hotels with a microwave and refrigerator.
  13. Yep, that's what we use.
  14. I am sorry. First of all I would say that the best option will probably be a combination of all the plans that you laid out. Find more clients use student loans cut expenses keep the house, you are very close to having it paid off have your son drop down to one instrument, lessons are great but expensive. He is only 11 and will be fine just studying one formally right now keep the chickens, they provide free food, but id you can adopt out some to cut down your feed costs that would help. pets are expensive. I recently calculated that our 2 guinea pigs and 1 rabbit have cost us $130/month over the last two years. Can you cut down to just one or two pets rather than 7?
  15. I finished a rocking chair with Varethane (water based) 22 years ago in a satin finish. It still looks great today. We have used varethane on all of our wood working projects since then and beeb pleased every time. Use a separate wood stain, do not use in all-in-one.
  16. My son's favorite daypack is the REI flash 18. It holds just enough, has comfortable straps and can hold a water bladder if you want one.
  17. ringworm Its fungal and can be treated with lotramin cream
  18. beef satay skewers cucumber salad jasmine rice watermelon
  19. I have never baked a loaf of bread from the book The Bread Bible that did not turn out perfectly. I always measure my ingredients by weight when baking and have even begun to convert my older recipes to weight.
  20. I absolutely agree with this. I tell people all the time that I am being forcibly retired. I have tried to convince my husband to adopt so that I can homeschool round 2 (he will not agree). So I had to face a change in life and while I thought that I might be fulfilled just puttering around, I found that I wasn't, so off to a new adventure it was.
  21. While agree with most everything you say and definitely bow to your greater experience, I have trouble with this statement. My parents bought an Atari for our family in the late 70's, early 80's. A psychologist who IQ tested me told them that I had a deficit in spatial relations and that playing video games would help. My four siblings and I always had a video game system. We played weekly but by high school only one played at all and in adulthood no one plays video games. My children have all had access to a game system for their entire lives and they definitely do not have issues with gaming. One doesn't game at all, one does a few hours a month and one plays a few hours a week and often goes weeks with no game time at all. Obviously this is anecdotal but I cannot believe that we are the only people in America with this experience. There has to be something more to the equation. And this, I agree with 100%. If any of my children had shown trouble managing game time, the system would have been gone. We had very limited TV at our house when the kids were growing up (less than 5 hours a week and we didn't have cable) and when they were 12, 9 and 6 we got a DVR, overnight they felt like they "had to watch" all the shows that we were recording. Instead of reading they were asking to watch TV. I got rid of the DVR that week. No one needs to feel compelled to watch Good Eats, Mythbusters and Cyber Chase.
  22. We do have a power recline sofa, but it is not in the main, public floor of our house. We have no TV on the main public floor. We have a walkout basement media room with a 92" projector screen with a u-shaped couch. On the main floor we have two living areas with a couch and loveseat in one and two loveseats in the other. Then upstairs we have all the bedrooms come off a central "loft" room that is open to the main floor. We have 7 bookcases, a 32" TV and a power recliner sofa there. The power recliner sofa is 8 years old and still works beautifully. Our children were all ten and up when we got it. My parents got a regular recliner sofa at the same time (no power).They have no kids living at home but 12 grandkids between 1 and 24 in age who visit frequently and it has been broken for a few years. I think that power ones are less apt to break because you don't have to try to jam them back in.
  23. I too have a a Silhouette Cameo. I have really enjoyed having it and I would say that I use it monthly. I primarily use it for paper cutting and for writing. It created all my Christmas gift tags for me. I have used it to address envleopes (very fancily). We also use it to cut heat transfer vinyl (shirt iron ons) and make custom t shirts. My daughter anted to get a Lord Nermal shirt for her sister (my other daughter) but the shirts were being shipped from china, expensive, slow and in unrealistic sizing (a woman's L was a girls 12) so she made her own on a t shirt from Old Navy.(yes I am sure that it is copyright infringement, but she only made one and is not selling them) My son made a shirt for his girlfriend for her birthday. I rarely do nay projects with vinyl. The silhouette design store has many, many designs and most are .99
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