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FREE Strayer-Upton like math curriculum: COMPLETE 3-book series with ANSWERS


Hunter
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:party:

 

I found a 1920's 3 book arithmetic series almost exactly like Strayer-Upton. It's FREE and you can PRINT out the pages nice and big.

 

Book 1 for grades 2-4

http://books.google.com/books?id=2W0XAAAAYAAJ&dq=editions:_hezQ0ym14sC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

Book 2 for Grades 5/6

http://books.google.com/books?id=F24XAAAAYAAJ&dq=editions:_hezQ0ym14sC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

Book 3 for Grades 7/8

http://books.google.com/books?id=BAYAAAAAYAAJ&dq=editions:_hezQ0ym14sC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

Answer keys are in the back of the books, just like in Strayer-Upton. In book 1 there are no answers for the oral work and games, but there are answers for all the seat work, even for problems as easy as 5-2=.

 

:hurray:

 

If you like Strayer-Upton, but wanted something FREE or in EBOOK format, you are likely to be very happy with this series.

 

EDIT Oct 24, 2017

 

Here is another graded math series with answer keys at the back. 1920. It is less integrated and more topical than the above series. The advanced book includes stand alone units for algebra, geometry, the metric system, ratio, roots, graphs, and stocks that can be used to supplement other older curriculums that do not include those topics or without enough detail.

 

1920 Hamilton Essentials of Arithmetic Lower 2-4

https://archive.org/details/hamiltonsessent03hamigoog

 

1920 Hamilton Essentials of Arithmetic Middle 5-6

https://archive.org/details/hamiltonsessent05hamigoog

 

1920 Hamilton Essentials of Arithmetic Advanced 7-8

https://archive.org/details/hamiltonsessent04hamigoog

 

1913 New Jersey Edition with Grade 1 work added. Pages 7-12

https://books.google.com/books?id=KgcAAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Edited by Hunter
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I've been using an older edition series by the same authors, and one of the books isn't that great of a scan, and while I was looking for a better copy, I found this 1920's edition and am SO happy. They are much nicer, especially the 7/8 book.

 

I have my new printer, and I'm about to order a heavy duty stapler. I'm going to be able to make some nice workbooks, for those students that do better writing in their book and having it enlarged. And at the same time, I can use these books on a device, or print them out small in booklet style when I don't want bulk. I'm really thrilled to have so many options.

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Book 1 starts with the second semester of the second grade. If you are looking for an entirely compatible book to use before book 1, take a look at Hamilton's Arithmetics Book 1 New Jersey Edition.

http://books.google.com/books?id=KgcAAAAAYAAJ&dq=editions:7KUrtxiHhpAC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

The above book is enough, but if you want more than that for grade 1, these are my current favorites to supplement this series. They are all cursive-first friendly, and just a few pages each.

 

Hands On Work

Eclectic Manual of Methods 1885 pg. 107-114

https://archive.org/details/eclecticmanualof00stew

 

Handwriting

A Primary Arithmetic and Teacher’s Manual 1875 by Edward Olney pg. 1-12

https://archive.org/details/aprimaryarithme03olnegoog

 

Math Journaling

Progressive Course in English Teachers’ Manual by E. J. Hoenshel pg. 13-14

http://books.google.com/books?id=Zn8SAAAAIAAJ&dq=Progressive+Course+in +English +Teacher’s+Manual&source=gbs_navlinks_s 

 

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"In the theory of the work the authors have no more sympathy with the idea that a pupil should be told to do a thing in a certain way, with no knowledge of why this way is the right one, than they have with the notion that he must explain every operation with all the care a textbook writer would show. They believe that every process should be learned with an appeal to the pupil's understanding, and that thereafter it should become entirely mechanical; and in this way each operation has been presented in this book." -- p. iv, grades 7-8

 

This is a great summary of how I believe mathematics should be taught.

 

I also find it really interesting that in the early part (p.7) it's teaching you to add left to right (though not teaching you to add 39 and 26 by instead adding 40 and 25). However, on p. 8 they're teaching to do 54c - 28c by subtracting 30c and then adding 2 (a far superior method for quick mental calculations if the pupil is able to handle it).

 

I really like their problems without words ... and it's rather funny that this is something that some of the anti-common-core people are complaining bitterly about.

 

So what I wonder is -- where did we lose our way?

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I also find it really interesting that in the early part (p.7) it's teaching you to add left to right (though not teaching you to add 39 and 26 by instead adding 40 and 25). However, on p. 8 they're teaching to do 54c - 28c by subtracting 30c and then adding 2 (a far superior method for quick mental calculations if the pupil is able to handle it).

 

Someone should screenshot that subtraction problem and make a faux anti-Common Core meme of it with the punch line being the textbook is from 1920.

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Thanks for posting this!  S-U is a fantastic math program!  I may use this if I can print pages and let the kids write on them. :hurray:

 

 

In the past I've either copied out problems for them to do or have done them orally or on a white board.  This will help me make it independent.  (My child who needs it the most is dyslexic and copying from the book for himself would take more time that doing the actual math.)

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I wrote a new math rough draft using these newly found resources.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Fvf4FXKZtoOTFkQ1Bka21ScU0/view?usp=sharing

EDIT: The math is now included in the full rough draft.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Fvf4FXKZtoZmdHdlZ5UWU0SWc/view?usp=sharing

 

EDIT 10/29/2017: My latest math. One or both above links are long gone. Sorry.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bwa0bk9o4pA3UVdFU18xVS0wZDg/view

Edited by Hunter
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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

It is harder to read fractions and exponents and answer keys in scanned copies. Therefore, I have decided I prefer S-U. These books are very very similar to S-U. So if you have a child that does better with a large page that they can write on, or if you cannot afford S-U, this is a good alternative option.

 

If the child does well with S-U and you can afford the books and shipping, I'd use S-U.

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Recently I tested my oldest three on a placement test for Monarch (which we just stopped our trial period of), and the oldest tested into 5th grade and the other two tested into 4th.  The oldest is 13 and the next two are 10 and 8 and are in 5th and 2nd grades.  But the 2nd grader has a natural math mind and the oldest two are not.  The second one does fine at math but he isn't used to persevering through academic struggle since most things come easily to him so he just is where he is even though I think he could intellectually handle more if he tried.  The oldest has always struggled with math.  Anyway, all that to say that they really are pretty similar in their math abilities though they have had varying levels of instruction.  The youngest of the three just does the math in his head without ever having been taught how so he probably doesn't do things "correctly" but he usually arrives at the right answer and often before the other two.  He has just always played with numbers in his head and enjoys a challenge.

 

That being said, I could have them in three different Saxon books (though the oldest two tested into 5/4) or I could put them all into S-U together and we could do math for an hour or less daily covering as much ground as we can handle.  The printing idea sounded good so that I didn't have to worry about them copying the problems at the same speed neatly (so that I can read it) but I honestly don't even know how to re-size and all that.  I also hate loose paper and binders so the papers would have to be bound or put into a pronged folder.  If I do that I don't have to buy 3 copies of S-U.  I am planning to at least buy one and try it with the third one either way.  But it might be neat to print out a section for all three and try this method (with all three together) and see how it goes.  It may save me a lot of time....

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Ok, we just did our first lesson all together (ages 8-13).  I just told them about the book, did a short demonstration of Roman numerals since somehow none of mine have ever been taught that, and then I assigned pages 1-4 to be done in their composition books.  Then I helped as needed and checked.

 

The oldest complained that we were switching AGAIN.  I told her we are not necessarily switching and that this was in addition to the two Saxon math tests she had done in the morning.  She has passed up through lesson 35 in Saxon 5/4 so far.  She will continue that until she hits where she should be in 5/4 or if she tests out of the book altogether.  She had a hard time with the wording of things at times and needed me to explain what they were asking a few times.  Of course the math itself was easy because we just did the first section called Counting to Twelve.

 

The middle child liked it and had almost no trouble.

 

The third child found the math to be easy but was very slow with the writing so it took him longer.  He also needed me to interpret several times and to remind him to put commas between lists of numbers, etc.  

 

It took us about an hour.  Instead of printing pages off I pulled up the ebook on their Chromebooks (they all have one) and just had them read it from there.  That actually went just fine.  I think it will go faster in the future because I won't have to give background info and hopefully won't have to explain as much how to set their paper up.  

 

So I guess Monday we will move on and tackle the addition section.  I think if we can do a section a day we can get through the book in 42 school days.  Of course some sections may take longer than one day.  Since I was talking about switching to S-U, that would be 46 sections.  If the sections are too long we may need to do it more by a certain number or pages or a certain length of time or something instead.  But it was nice to knock out three kids in one hour.  

 

So no decisions yet but it was interesting and worth trying again on Monday.

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yes I downloaded the PDF.  Did you check your copy for the pages in book 1 that I mentioned.  Otherwise the book looks complete and in order.   :)  I downloaded it from google books if that makes any difference.

Did you download the PDF?  I just downloaded it, and I don't have any missing pages.

 

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I found books two and three on archive.org but not book one, and I can't access the ebooks on Google. Would anyone be generous enough with their time to get me book one somehow? I could PM you my email address unless you have a more convenient way. All I can give in return is my appreciation.

 

ETA: Got it. Thanks! :)

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Guest hhwacademy

thank u so much for this as we have one upton book now we love but needed other ones for other kids love this ty so much!!!!!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hunter, could you tell me a bit about why you like Strayer-Upton?

 

Teeny tiny books with answer keys included. Cheap. More concise and developmentally appropriate than most modern choices.

 

Small hardcover books with a rubber band fastened around them hold up best in the backpack of homeless students. What? Your students are not carrying math books from one city to another on a middle of the night bus running from one China Town to another?

 

I like curriculum in context of where and by whom it will be used.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Teeny tiny books with answer keys included. Cheap. More concise and developmentally appropriate than most modern choices.

 

Small hardcover books with a rubber band fastened around them hold up best in the backpack of homeless students. What? Your students are not carrying math books from one city to another on a middle of the night bus running from one China Town to another?

 

I like curriculum in context of where and by whom it will be used.

Would you say the content is comparable? I just downloaded the first one to my phone and did the first five lessons or so myself and I love it. I love the idea of being able to print it out like a workbook.

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These 2 series are almost identical. I prefer the professionally printed S-U books once I start fractions and exponents; they just are not as clear as I would like in the scanned copies. I have found that I do not like ANY scanned vintage math books once I hit fractions and exponents.

 

This scanned series is fine to start with, and can be used in a push while waiting to purchase S-U, but I think most people will become frustrated long term trying to read the fractions.

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  • 8 months later...

If I am on my phone, all I can do is "add to library". If I am on a windows laptop, I can download.

 

I have no home WiFi. I have not figured out a way to download Google books onto my phone and then tether them to my laptop. Last night, I was trying to download Lutz's Practical Drawing and couldn't.

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I have to say, Hunter, you are one of the most resourceful posters I have ever come across online. :) You do a tremendous service to people by your posts.

I enjoy finding things and sharing them. Thank you. I have a friend that says that although she enjoys being able to call me with quirky questions there is just something very wrong with me knowing the answers to such things. :lol:

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  • 3 months later...

Bumping this. I cannot download this, it doesn't bring up any option for it. Any other suggestions or places where this can be downloaded? The only option is gives me is "Add to library"

Are you in the US? Us foreigners can't access Google books *boo hiss*

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  • 2 months later...

Doing a little research on this series, it appears that Book 3 was sometimes skipped and the 1917/1918 Junior High School Mathematics series 1, 2, 3 were used instead for grades 7-9.

 

Book 1

https://books.google.com/books?id=FGjeUbo-Q78C&dq=editions%3AfgurGE6J_qYC&source=gbs_similarbooks

 

Book 2

https://books.google.com/books?id=rdxEAAAAIAAJ&dq=editions%3AfgurGE6J_qYC&source=gbs_similarbooks

 

Book 3

https://books.google.com/books?id=GGU4AAAAMAAJ&dq=editions:fgurGE6J_qYC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

If I view these books on a laptop size screen and wear reading glasses, I can make out the fractions and exponents. With my old 50 year old eyes, I cannot see these as well as the professionally published Mott Media and Amish printed hardbound books, but I can read them. It takes a larger screen and glasses, though, for ME.

 

I'm finding the scope and sequence of the junior high series interesting compared to elementary 7/8 books. More algebra and geometry and less business math.

 

Sometimes the Junior High 3 book was skipped to start year 1 of a high school series.

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I am playing around with how to schedule these books. This is what I am thinking about this afternoon.

EDIT removed link. No longer applicable. See below.

 

In my oldschool brain, that is stuck in the 90's, 8th grade is the first year of a GENERAL high school plan that graduates a student a year or two early, and is followed by community college started as a freshman, not a duel enrolled high-school student. And not a community college that has upped its entrance requirements to be primarily transfer students with guaranteed acceptance to a 4 year college, but a school that focuses on their 2 year degrees and the students pursuing those degrees.

 

So in my head, I need math for "high school" that covers what is on the GED and is needed to be ready to take "College Algebra" that is equal to a rigorous Algebra 2 course or maybe just a teeny tad beyond that.

 

So...I like the Wentworth-Smith Junior High Mathematics as an "Integrated Mathematics" course. If I were to print these books out, I would make cover pages that said "Wentworth-Smith Arithmetic" on the lower level books, and "Wentworth-Smith Mathematics" on the higher level books and leave the "Junior High" off.

 

As long as MY printed books had those labels on them at MY house, I'd have no problem writing those titles on paperwork to the school board. And would refer to the "High School" course titles as "Integrated Mathematics 1, 2, 3". If I broke book 3 up into separate algebra/trig and geometry curses, I'd call those courses "Integrated Mathematics 3, 4" and add in lessons from the pages of the skipped business and consumer math topics in Arithmetic Book 3. At MY house the 3rd arithmetic book would carry a title of something like "Wentworth-Smith Higher Arithmetic" or "Consumer Math".

Edited by Hunter
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The Wentworth-Smith series is more concise than Strayer-Upton and isn't padded with as much review. I'm able to see more clearly what the main topics are for each chapter. For ME it is always easier to add than subtract. To print these books, it is about 150 pages a year. That isn't awful. That is only about 17 pages a month for a 9 month school year.

 

Printed double-sided, a half-year chapter should be able to be stapled with a heavy duty stapler.

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I been doing some more research and reading.

 

Strayer-Upton Book 3 is different than the earlier books. It has lots of short chapters and jumps around. 7th grade is 14 chapters, not 2. And 8th grade is chapters 15-29. It isn't all that easy to skip chapters if you want to use the tests and reviews, so short chapters don't help all that much in being able to individualize topics covered.

 

These books were considered rigorous. And many schools that had previously used ungraded texts had long standing practices of scheduling topics later than in these new graded books. It was rare for rural schools to finish book 2 in the 6th grade. So they had to compact book 3. But really the short chapters in SU don't help enough.

 

Wentworth-Smith chose to cover more pure arithmetic in 7th grade and more applied arithmetic in 8th. One possible schedule for a "behind" student is WS 3 chapters 1-2, Boyden's First Book in Algebra, some Euclid based geometry, and then to finish WS 3 chapters 3-4 as a "Consumer Math" course.

 

Boyden's First Book in Algebra

https://books.google.com/books?id=OhMAAAAAYAAJ&dq=editions:_u8QbcFJzl4C&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

Hill's First Lessons in Geometry

https://books.google.com/books?id=ySUAAAAAYAAJ&dq=hill+first+lessons+in+geometry&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

Hailmann's Constructive Form Work

https://books.google.com/books?id=FTEAAAAAYAAJ&dq=hailmann+constructive+form+work&source=gbs_navlinks_s

 

Oliver Byrne's Euclid

https://archive.org/details/firstsixbooksofe00eucl

 

Euclid videos at youtube

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFC65BA76F7142E9D

 

 

 

 

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The Greeks didn't use the hindu-arabic decimal number system. Not only could they not do algebra, but they couldn't even do advanced arithmetic. They could do certain kinds of geometry though. This is a goldmine for "behind" high school students. It is becoming trendy to study Euclid right now and blogs and websites are popping up with help for mom.

http://afterthoughtsblog.net/2012/11/teaching-euclid-in-homeschool-part-i-by.html

 

If you dig around in vintage books, there are some great finds. I listed the ones I think are best to use with WS.

 

You can even do your Euclid in Koine Greek. I used this site with one of my boys a LONG time ago. He also used a couple bilingual Loeb Classics books on Greek mathematics.

 

http://mysite.du.edu/~etuttle/classics/nugreek/contents.htm#conts

 

https://www.loebclassics.com/view/euclid-greek_mathematical_works_xiv_euclid/1939/pb_LCL335.437.xml?rskey=S6bNiv&result=1

 

Don't be afraid of anything Euclid after finishing WS book 2. And if the book says earlier, and you are using WS, you can usually go along with whatever is suggested. 

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  • 1 year later...

Hamilton's Essentials of Arithmetic Higher Grades 1920 is similar to Wentworth-Smith Book 3, but has a much stronger pre-algebra focus. The algebra and geometry chapters are excellent, and there is an answer key for the written problems.

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=KQYAAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

The Algebra is on pages 203-220 and is a nice little unit.

 

This book could be used as a substitute or supplement for W-S Book 3.

 

Here is the 1917 Edition that is a bit different. It includes a unit on longitude and time that I don't think is in the later book. I think it might make a good supplement to the Charlotte Mason Geography if you are using that.

https://books.google.com/books?id=b4MAAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Edited by Hunter
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