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#1 Parrothead

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 09:56 AM

Can someone tell me how many lessons are in the first book? TIA.

#2 redsquirrel

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:01 AM

Do you have the teacher's guide?

I have the first book right here and there are 30 chapters. It is just writing, with subchapters and charts etc, like a typical text book. It doesn't have lessons or question sections in the book.

I don't have any guide or anything. I just assign it as reading.

#3 Pam L in Mid Tenn

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:08 AM

I don't know how many chapters,but there is a Student Quest book with assessments, projects, and workbook pages. I am hoping that I have not sold this book now!

#4 Parrothead

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:16 AM

No, I've ordered the text and the student guide. I'll be gettingthem Wednesday, but I'm trying to get an outline for the next 6 years on paper.

#5 Terabith

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:35 AM

How do you use this? What grade levels? Do you use it as part of science or history? I'm curious! I always loved the history of science as a kid, but wasn't sure how to incorporate it.

#6 Parrothead

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 10:51 AM

I'm going to start on page 1 of the first book and go forward until dd finishes the last page of the third book. I'm hoping it can be done in 2 1/2 years.

#7 cschnee

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 01:16 PM

The TG of Aristotle Leads the Way has 5 units and each unit has an intro lesson + 7 lessons and then the 8th lesson is a prep for assessments and the 9th lesson is the assessment. Hope that helps. If you need any details, please feel free to ask.

#8 Parrothead

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 01:38 PM

Thank you very much for the breakdown.

Do you like it?

#9 Parrothead

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 07:55 AM

I"m going to find out all about the series soon. My order is 'out for delivery" Wow! That was quick.

#10 Sherri in MI

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 10:29 PM

I'd really like to know how you like it, once you try it. I'm really interested in it, but am hesitant to commit without seeing it in person or finding out how others like it.

I also can't decide whether just to get the text, and have ds just read it, or purchase the entire curriculum (student quest guide & TG).

Thanks!

#11 missmoe

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 10:44 PM

Sherri,

Thought you might be interested in my review of the Student and Teacher's Quest: http://missmoe-these...ch/label/review

I'm a big fan of the series and all materials that have been published to support them.

#12 Momling

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 01:04 AM

My 9 year old recently started using it and we both *love* it. I think we're on chapter 5. It's meaty, but accessible to kids -- written in a chatty way, but not talking down to children. The quest guides are really aimed at classrooms, but we're trying them out anyway.

The author sent my daughter a few chapters from her new book (something to do with life science I think) and they were wonderful too.

#13 cschnee

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 12:03 PM

We are only on chapter 3 using the TG and SG and we love it! Discussions, experiments, etc are all great. We divided the SG up and are putting the timeline they suggest directly into it, instead of "hanging" it on a wall. We're making that SG sorta a scrapbook unto itself. We are doing it slowly though, a chapter a week, a bit everyday, as we do other science daily as well.

#14 StephanieZ

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 04:12 PM

I love these. I am wrapping up year 2 of using SoS along with the quest guides.

Here is a search that has a bunch of pertinent threads. I posted on several with details of how I use them, but don't have time right now to find my posts.

http://www.welltrain...earchid=7617445

In short, I schedule the book to last us the school year, so about 36 weeks. All kids read the materials on their own or with their parents. We do an average of one, sometimes two, chapters each week. We meet for two hours about every 2 weeks with a small group (4-6 kids, depending on the year) to do activities and experiments. We also have a big timeline on the wall to which we add people each meeting. I usually cover 2 chapters in a meeting, but occasionally cover 3. Two works very well for us. We can't do it all, but we can pick the best activities and we have a great time. It's been very successful for us. If you wanted to do more, you could meet each week and do a chapter a week. (I don't think any of the books have more than about 40 chapters.)

We don't do a lot of the 'active reading' stuff, but we have done parts of it on occasion. It is valuable if you really want the kids to retain most of the material, but I am not too hung up on that. This is an 'extra' for us. I just make a point to emphasize the science concepts I think are most relevant and most fun. . . So, I took our time with Newtonian Mechanics and the origins of Calculus. .. but I might have skimmed over (combined 3 chapters in one meeting, etc) some of the more obscure topics and/or the more history oriented sections (that had fewer hands on activities).

It's been an AWESOME resource for us.

FWIW, there is a teacher's guide (presumably similar to Quest guide) available for Einstein from the National Science Teacher's Association. Free to download if you are a member, otherwise $20 or so. I'll be using that next year presuming no Quest guides are released for Einstein prior to then.

#15 JumpedIntoTheDeepEndFirst

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 04:24 PM

Did they ever finish this series up and get student and teacher books for the final volume?

Parrothead-they are all sitting on my shelf so feel free to pm with a question if you need to.

#16 NoPlaceLikeHome

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 06:46 PM

Where do you buy these guides? Any discounts still? I recall that there were some discounts.

#17 brownie

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 07:25 PM

can someone explain these? I got Aristotle Leads the Way from the library and it doesn't really look like a textbook to me...just a book. My son started looking it over, but is this the same thing people are using for science? Does the author publish the TG or is it someone independent?
Brownie

#18 Momling

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 10:52 PM

I'm pretty sure the quest guides and teacher manual not written by the author, but it is written well -- with interesting activities and ideas for teaching.

#19 kalanamak

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 10:17 AM

Hope that helps. If you need any details, please feel free to ask.


May I? I was reading reviews of this, and was wondering (since Amazon doesn't have a look inside for this book) how much religion is in it. One reviewer complained about how anti-Christian it was and gave an example of the medieval Church hiding knowledge, and she saw them as preserving the ancients, not hiding them (and I'm betting there was some of each :001_smile:).

The reason I ask is not because I'm religious or worried about an anti-Christian slant, but because we cover religion in history and, gosh how do I say this effectively and inoffensively, I don't want to have to talk about religion all through another curriculum. Neither kiddo or I find religion very interesting, and while I'll do my duty to teach him about it historically, enough is enough.

Reading another thread a few months back, I was lead to believe JH's Story of US is not even secular. So, I'm wondering how much of this series spends on religion, i.e. how much the author discusses religious beliefs in her science book. Thanks.

Edited by kalanamak, 10 April 2011 - 02:17 PM.


#20 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 12:43 PM

watching with interest

#21 Mert

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 12:47 PM

watching with interest


Same here! :bigear:

#22 Dana

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 02:00 PM

Reading another thread a few months back, I was lead to believe JH's Story of US is not even secular. So, I'm wondering how much of this series spends on religion, i.e. how much the author discusses religious beliefs in her science book. Thanks.


We've been using Story of US. I haven't seen anything in it that would have me say it was anything BUT secular. We've worked through Books 1-6.

I have Story of Science and haven't read every book yet. I intend to use Story of Science along with the Oxford Press and K12 books for world history. I have the teacher guide but not the student guides for Story of Science. It appeared to me that the TG had enough information.

#23 NoPlaceLikeHome

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 02:35 PM

May I? I was reading reviews of this, and was wondering (since Amazon doesn't have a look inside for this book) how much religion is in it. One reviewer complained about how anti-Christian it was and gave an example of the medieval Church hiding knowledge, and she saw them as preserving the ancients, not hiding them (and I'm betting there was some of each :001_smile:).

The reason I ask is not because I'm religious or worried about an anti-Christian slant, but because we cover religion in history and, gosh how do I say this effectively and inoffensively, I don't want to have to talk about religion all through another curriculum. Neither kiddo or I find religion very interesting, and while I'll do my duty to teach him about it historically, enough is enough.

Reading another thread a few months back, I was lead to believe JH's Story of US is not even secular. So, I'm wondering how much of this series spends on religion, i.e. how much the author discusses religious beliefs in her science book. Thanks.


I believe the Story of the US is secular since K12 which a public charter schools uses it.

#24 tjarnold

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 02:39 PM

May I? I was reading reviews of this, and was wondering (since Amazon doesn't have a look inside for this book) how much religion is in it.


No religion is in it, except to tell the story of science within historical context. The author is not Christian, and the series is definitely secular.

We've been using Aristotle Leads the Way this year for my 6th-grader and 7th-grader, occasionally using the Teacher's Manual and Quest Guide. I don't think we'll continue with the TM and Quest Guide in the future, but that's probably mostly because I tend not to use teacher's manuals in general. I buy them, but I don't use them.

My question is this ... I'm in a dilemma about what to do for my soon-to-be 8th-grader. Looking toward high school, should I have my son just continue with Story of Science, and then plunge into biology (probably a secular textbook, since my husband doesn't want to use Apologia), or should I switch to a new program now? I'm thinking my son might need more of a foundation before he hits a massive biology textbook.

Anyone have advice?

#25 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 06:30 PM

According to this site the Story of US and the Story of Science are secular.

They list SOTW as not secular, yet it is secular enough for my use. :)

#26 kalanamak

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 07:19 PM

According to this site the Story of US and the Story of Science are secular.

They list SOTW as not secular, yet it is secular enough for my use. :)


Something can be secular and still dwell upon the religious aspects of any given situation, excusing it as "historical". I grew up in a spiritual black hole (thank you very much, folks) compared to what my son is getting in his education. I'm willing to go through what all this religious business is once, but not twice. We get enough religious history in SOTW.

All this dwelling makes my son wonder a little why we aren't religious. Not much, because I think he is a born non-deist like myself, but a little. Not to offend anyone, but we have some real chuckles over what people do for their religious beliefs. And we cluck our tongues over religious atrocities.

I'm not expressing myself well, I suspect. I will see if I can get one of the books from the library.

#27 Parrothead

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 07:31 PM

It doesn't seem to be a religious text. From what I've read so far it is far from religious.

#28 Sherri in MI

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 12:10 AM

Sherri,

Thought you might be interested in my review of the Student and Teacher's Quest: http://missmoe-these...ch/label/review

I'm a big fan of the series and all materials that have been published to support them.



Very helpful review, Miss Moe, thank you!

Hey everyone -you can download samples of each book, Teacher's Quest Guide, & Student Quest Guide at:

http://smithsonianbo...value=Aristotle

#29 StephanieZ

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 01:26 AM

FYI, the third book does not have quest guides. Rather, there is a teacher's companion (both teacher and student text in one 214 pg pdf) available from NSTA. http://www.nsta.org/...5/9781933531571 It is $10. I just bought it tonight for next year, so I can't vouch for it. . . but on first glance it looks at least as great as the Quest Guides. (I love them, and advise getting BOTH the teacher and student.)

We're about 3/4 of the way through Newton. We had a meeting today and had a blast learning about moles, atomic mass, the periodic table, etc. It was great fun. Really!

Also, FWIW, 95% of the hands on activities I've been able to do with household items I already have in my relatively well stocked garage, kitchen, & science shelves (years of homeschooling, lol) in the basement. I've probably spent less than $20 each year buying additional items for activities, and we've done the vast majority of the hands-on activities. I find this VERY nice!

#30 StephanieZ

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 01:40 AM

Secular? Definitely. These are NOT religious texts. Science & history, not religion.

If you are very sensitive about churches being portrayed in a positive light, you might get irritated. The texts don't omit the recurring theme of scientists being persecuted by their (usually Christian, of many various branches) churches. The conflict between church and science is a recurring implicit theme, and it is not sugar coated. Over hundreds/thousands of years and across continents, you do hear the same story again and again. Personally, I love this. :) I love a theme. It points to something true and meaningful.

I love that today the kids were reading about some poor bloke being thrown out of his church in the 17-1800s (or was it in jail, too?) b/c he asserted that there were essential units of elements (atoms). Apparently atomic theory was very controversial for many hundreds of years. Who knew that the thought of an atom would apparently shake some folks' faiths enough to throw someone out of church or into jail? This tale is not particularly elaborated upon, just a few sentences. . . but, this TYPE of story comes up again and again. . . so, if you notice it, a theme does emerge. In my way of thinking, this is a great thing for my kids to pick up. I elaborate on it and make sure to put my spin on it. I think it helps put in context some of the modern controversies between science and religion. IMHO, this is valuable to every citizen or scientist or theologian.

If my above rattling on about this issue offends you, you might find ground to be offended by the series if you are looking for it. . . So, buyer beware if this is a hot button for you.

#31 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 08:33 AM

Very helpful review, Miss Moe, thank you!

Hey everyone -you can download samples of each book, Teacher's Quest Guide, & Student Quest Guide at:

http://smithsonianbo...value=Aristotle


Great! Thanks.

#32 StephanieZ

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 09:00 AM

Great! Thanks.


You're very welcome.

#33 missmoe

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 12:25 PM

Secular? Definitely. These are NOT religious texts. Science & history, not religion.

If you are very sensitive about churches being portrayed in a positive light, you might get irritated. The texts don't omit the recurring theme of scientists being persecuted by their (usually Christian, of many various branches) churches. The conflict between church and science is a recurring implicit theme, and it is not sugar coated. Over hundreds/thousands of years and across continents, you do hear the same story again and again. Personally, I love this. :) I love a theme. It points to something true and meaningful.

I love that today the kids were reading about some poor bloke being thrown out of his church in the 17-1800s (or was it in jail, too?) b/c he asserted that there were essential units of elements (atoms). Apparently atomic theory was very controversial for many hundreds of years. Who knew that the thought of an atom would apparently shake some folks' faiths enough to throw someone out of church or into jail? This tale is not particularly elaborated upon, just a few sentences. . . but, this TYPE of story comes up again and again. . . so, if you notice it, a theme does emerge. In my way of thinking, this is a great thing for my kids to pick up. I elaborate on it and make sure to put my spin on it. I think it helps put in context some of the modern controversies between science and religion. IMHO, this is valuable to every citizen or scientist or theologian.

If my above rattling on about this issue offends you, you might find ground to be offended by the series if you are looking for it. . . So, buyer beware if this is a hot button for you.


Very well said! The books cover the historical facts of religion. Fact--the Catholic Church felt this way about this scientist and responded to his book in this mannar. The scientist responded to the church in this way. This scientist had to put up with people responding to his theories in this way because at the time this certain belief was commonly held.

The book doesn't in anyway condone any religous veiwpoint. The Catholic Church was in affect acting as a government throughout Europe for many centuries, so an accurate retelling of history can not leave out that aspect of life.

Also, the first book in the series does talk about many different creation stories and mythological beliefs ancient people had. Again this was a governing influence in life at that time, so leaving it out of a historical retelling would not be a responable retelling.

Edited by missmoe, 12 April 2011 - 02:50 PM.


#34 DarlaS

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 01:46 PM

It doesn't seem to be a religious text. From what I've read so far it is far from religious.


Something (or someone--like Phillip Pullman ;)) can be secular/not religious, and still quite fixated on religion.

#35 In2why

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 02:29 PM

May I? I was reading reviews of this, and was wondering (since Amazon doesn't have a look inside for this book) how much religion is in it. One reviewer complained about how anti-Christian it was and gave an example of the medieval Church hiding knowledge, and she saw them as preserving the ancients, not hiding them (and I'm betting there was some of each :001_smile:).

The reason I ask is not because I'm religious or worried about an anti-Christian slant, but because we cover religion in history and, gosh how do I say this effectively and inoffensively, I don't want to have to talk about religion all through another curriculum. Neither kiddo or I find religion very interesting, and while I'll do my duty to teach him about it historically, enough is enough.

Reading another thread a few months back, I was lead to believe JH's Story of US is not even secular. So, I'm wondering how much of this series spends on religion, i.e. how much the author discusses religious beliefs in her science book. Thanks.


She wrote these books to be used in Public schools as well as for homeschoolers and others. I own the first in the series and I haven't finished it but I wouldn't consider them religious.
Joy Hakim was the Key note speaker at Virginia Homeschoolers Convention last month and I heard her speak and was quite impressed. She began her career as a journalist and began her "Story of US" series because she didn't think the Public schools were doing a good job. She used her journalist research skills to learn about her subjects. She doesn't pretend to be an expert in the subjects. What she does instead is extensively interview experts, and organizes the material. Afterwards she gives her manuscripts to kids with instructions to write where it is boring, where it doesn't make sense, where they need more info and so on. She states they are her harshest critics.
I am looking forward to going through her science series with the activity guides when mine age up a bit, and I am going to follow our history cycle at the same time, with the hopes that they will mesh well.

#36 LAS in LA

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 03:01 PM

If you are very sensitive about churches being portrayed in a positive light, you might get irritated. The texts don't omit the recurring theme of scientists being persecuted by their (usually Christian, of many various branches) churches. The conflict between church and science is a recurring implicit theme, and it is not sugar coated. Over hundreds/thousands of years and across continents, you do hear the same story again and again. Personally, I love this. :) I love a theme. It points to something true and meaningful.

I love that today the kids were reading about some poor bloke being thrown out of his church in the 17-1800s (or was it in jail, too?) b/c he asserted that there were essential units of elements (atoms). Apparently atomic theory was very controversial for many hundreds of years. Who knew that the thought of an atom would apparently shake some folks' faiths enough to throw someone out of church or into jail? This tale is not particularly elaborated upon, just a few sentences. . . but, this TYPE of story comes up again and again. . . so, if you notice it, a theme does emerge.
:iagree:

I think this is what annoyed me when I checked this series out of the library a couple years ago. In making science vs. religion a leitmotif, the author has to leave out examples of the church supporting science, and ignore the motivations of and conclusions drawn by scientists who believe. I felt the result was simplistic and that the author spoke with too much authority. There was a tone of "see what silly ancient/medieval/early-modern people thought, but now we've figured it all out", which drove me crazy. I really wanted to like this series, but couldn't, even after a couple of attempts. :(

#37 Cricket on the Hearth

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 04:04 PM

I try to follow the Hakim threads whenever I see one and have been following this one also. Thank you for this thread. It has been very informative. Thank you also to Sherri for the link to the samples. I had not seen samples before so that was very helpful. My son is much too young but I think I will get Aristotle Leads the Way (that's the only one my library carries currently) to read myself when I get the chance. I find the series very intriguing.

Thanks again everyone :)

#38 Sherri in MI

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Posted 19 April 2011 - 11:16 PM

You're welcome.

I just found out that my library system has all 3 through inter-library loan, so I ordered Aristotle Leads the Way so we can try it out. I'm probably just going to use the book, as we are already doing another science program.

#39 cschnee

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Posted 08 May 2011 - 05:43 PM

"FYI, the third book does not have quest guides. Rather, there is a teacher's companion (both teacher and student text in one 214 pg pdf) available from NSTA. http://www.nsta.org/...5/9781933531571 It is $10. "

Stephanie,

According to the NSTA store, one can only buy the teacher's companion if one is a member. Did you find this to be the case? Or it comes free if you buy the book? Or am I missing something?

Thanks!

Cindy



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