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Robin M

Book a Week 2018 - BW16: Red Shoe

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 Happy Sunday and Welcome to week sixteen in our Open Roads Reading Adventure. Greetings to all our readers and to all following our progress.  Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks  to share a link to your book reviews.

 It's time for a mini challenge and an opportunity to complete the Red Shoe on the Cover category for 52 Books bingo.  Read a book with an image of a red shoe or a pair of red shoes on the cover or with Red Shoe in the title.  You can also mix it up a bit by exploring books with shoes in different shades of red as well. 

Red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2Bapples%2Bfor%2Bsam.jpg

red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2BBalzac%2Band%2Bthe%2Blittle%2Bchinese%2Bseamstress.jpg

Red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2Bcinder.jpg

red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2Bfootprints%2Bin%2Bthe%2Bsand.jpg

red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2Bjust%2Blike%2Bheaven.jpg

red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2Bred%2Bshoe%2Bursula%2Bduborsarksy.jpg

red%2Bshoe%2Bred%2Bshoes%2Bhans%2Bchristian%2Banderson.jpg

red%2Bshoe%2Bbook%2BIn%2Bher%2BShoes.jpg
Courtesy of Jennifer Weiner


Check out Goodread's selection of Red Shoes as well as Books with one shoe on the cover,   Find out more about the history of red shoes through Australian Ballet's Why So Fascinating, Sassy Bella's The Scarlet Heel, and Tales of Faerie's Red Shoes in fairy tales and history

For our Brit Trippers, trip on down to Tyne and Wear which is located on the Tyne River and on the North Sea making it historically a large center of shipbuilding for centuries.

 Rabbit trails: Souter Lighthouse

*****************************************

What are you reading? 

 

Link to Week 15

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Good morning, my lovelies.  I'm currently reading Robert Jordan's Crossroads at Twilight, listening to Keri Arthur's City of Light and dipping my toes into Michael Ende's The Neverending Story.    James and I are reading Elie Wiesel's Night and are almost done with audiobook of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.

I'm off to the mall to find a formal dress for my niece's wedding.(her orders - it has to be long) She was my flower child when hubby and I got married 20 years ago, so her wish is my command.  It's taking place on May 5th in Texas. Yep, Cinco de Mayo. They are having a Black Tie Mexican fiesta.  Fun!!!   

 

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This week I finished

35. Horace McCoy, They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

-- experimental crime fiction from the Great Depression, about a young man and woman who enter a marathon dance competition, at the end of which she asks him to kill her and he complies. Which isn't a spoiler as you learn all that right at the beginning; the story describes the violence, sexual acting-out, and general strangeness that marks the dancers' slow descent into a sort of temporary madness induced by exhaustion and sleep deprivation. A classic for a reason.

36. Robert Fergusson, Selected Poems.

There's Northumbria done, with Edinburgh, a/k/a "Auld Reikie."

Quote

At Hallowmas, whan nights grow lang,
And starnies shine fu' clear,
Whan fock, the nippin cauld to bang,
Their winter hapwarms wear;
Near Edinburgh a fair there hads,
I wat there's nane whase name is,
For strappin dames and sturdy lads,
And cap and stoup, mair famous
Than it that day.

- Hallow-Fair

37. John Wyndham, The Day of the Triffids

And when the green meteor-shower blinds all humanity, leaving them easy prey for ten-foot tall carnivorous plants, where do you flee from the triffid apocalypse? To the Isle of Wight, naturally!

Before continuing on the Ichnield Way, however, I'm taking a break for some other reading. Wee Girl has been binge-watching the new season of A Series of Unfortunate Events, which has unaccountably inspired me this week to read Baudelaire's Journaux Intimes and Dickens' Oliver Twist.

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Robin, what a fun idea! I've read the Balzac book and my daughter read the Cinder book. We both read these a few years ago. 

I read A Taste of Venice - 3 Stars - Donna Leon’s Brunetti books are fabulous when it comes to food descriptions. If you’re anything like me, and have started to crave some good Italian food while reading them, this is an enjoyable read. It was written by Donna Leon’s best friend and talented cook, Roberta (Biba) Pianaro. 

The other day I decided that I will no longer review a cookbook without trying out at least one recipe. I can’t believe that I didn’t make this rule for myself earlier ! What was I thinking? I mean honestly, I don’t think that it’s right to review a cookbook without trying out at least one recipe! Well, I made an entire meal from the recipes here the other night and everyone was happy. We had Chickpea Balls for the appetizer. Our main course was Lamp Chops with Tomatoes and Basmati Rice. For dessert, we had Oven-Baked Apples with Confectioner’s Custard and Cream. They were delicious. Now, as far as cookbooks go, this book is okay, just not the best. The layout is not as organized as I like cookbooks to be. Also, there are a few recipes that contain ingredients which aren’t available where I live, and may be unavailable to others also. Mind you, this is not only a cookbook. There are excerpts from the Brunetti books, as well as essays with insights into Venetian life. 

Some of my favorite quotes:

"Italian life is filled with food: people talk about it constantly, spend a great deal of time shopping for it and preparing it, and devote a joyous amount of time to eating it. One has but to pay close attention to them when they talk about food, or when they cook and eat, to begin to understand how fundamental it is to the living of a happy life and how vital it is to Italian culture."

“One of the first things that was said to me when I came to Italy forty years ago, speaking not a word of the language, was ‘Mangia, mangia, ti fa bene.’ Eat, eat, it’s good for you.” 

9780434020195.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
Fantastic, couldn't put it down
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable 
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.

 

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Robin,  Thanks for all of the red shoe bingo ideas.  I still need to complete that square so plan to make use of your links!

Last week was my week to tackle the new to me mystery authors with Medieval settings in my stack. I ended up abandoning my Sister Fidelma mystery (Absolution for Murder by Peter Tremayne) because it was a hard to read because period language was intermixed.  I had been really looking forward to the setting of Whitby so was sad to give up on it.  In the author’s notes section of one of the Ariana Franklin books that I have been listening to she discusses the fact that she is often criticized for using modern language in her historical settings.  I liked her response to her critics.......in the 12th century her characters were speaking using modern languages so she uses the modern language of her readers to tell her stories.  Not saying a bit for atmosphere can’t be used but that book had so much it couldn’t be a book to fall asleep to which is what I try to keep on my kindle.

 

My other medieval read is called Hangman Blind by Cassandra Clark which I am enjoying.  This one is set in the fourteenth century in the East Riding of Yorkshire.  It uses many of the old names for places so I am still googling in order to figure out where she is physically in the story mainly because we have visited many Abbey ruins in this area.  But the story is relatively easy to follow.  The main character is a wealthy widow whose husband died in the war with France.  She has decided to use her weath to set herself up as Abbess of a small congregation of like minded sisters and minister to the poor.  One of her main goals is literacy so I like her.  This first book is about her search for a location for her Abbey with the political turmoil (and murders) in the background.  She is pulled in to helping solve the murders  by her husband’s friends who have a high regard for her.  I will probably continue to read this series.

 

I am hoping that the CS Harris books that I have on hold will appear soon.  I am now second on the list for for herreally  latest in the series, Why Kill the Innocent, and really do not want to have to suspend it because I haven’t finished my reread.  Until my books arrive I plan to keep reading my stack which includes an Anne Cleeves In her Vera series for Northumbria.

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Last night I finished a wonderful Chilean noir mystery, Dark Echoes of the Past by Ramon Diaz Eterovic. It is the only novel of his translated into English, though his books are very popular in Chile. I'd definitely read more of them and think several of you would enjoy this one, though it isn't for the squeamish as there are a few brutal descriptions of the torture tactics used during the Pinochet regime.  But the detective, Heredia is a great character. He writes book reviews when he doesn't have a case, his office/apartment is packed with books and he reads everything from poetry to Dashiell Hammet, and he has a cat.  You also get some wonderful noir atmosphere:

  Quote

I opened one of the windows of my apartment and observed the night time city that, in the light of the moon, had the apparent calm of a lake. The sneaky old lady didn't fool me, though. I knew about the misery and the secrets crouching in the corners, the pain nesting beneath the bridges, the humidity of the tenements, the drunk resignation of those who slept on the sidewalks, the sadness of the streetwalkers by the gates, and the cry of the brat who panhandled on the last bus to nowhere. 

 

I loved it, but decided a "palate cleanser" was in order, so I started reading Three Men in a Boat!

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6 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

This week I finished

35. Horace McCoy, They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

-- experimental crime fiction from the Great Depression, about a young man and woman who enter a marathon dance competition, at the end of which she asks him to kill her and he complies. Which isn't a spoiler as you learn all that right at the beginning; the story describes the violence, sexual acting-out, and general strangeness that marks the dancers' slow descent into a sort of temporary madness induced by exhaustion and sleep deprivation. A classic for a reason.

36. Robert Fergusson, Selected Poems.

There's Northumbria done, with Edinburgh, a/k/a "Auld Reikie."

37. John Wyndham, The Day of the Triffids

And when the green meteor-shower blinds all humanity, leaving them easy prey for ten-foot tall carnivorous plants, where do you flee from the triffid apocalypse? To the Isle of Wight, naturally!

Before continuing on the Ichnield Way, however, I'm taking a break for some other reading. Wee Girl has been binge-watching the new season of A Series of Unfortunate Events, which has unaccountably inspired me this week to read Baudelaire's Journaux Intimes and Dickens' Oliver Twist.

The  Day of the Triffids is my planned selection for Isle of Wight too. :).   I was really excited when doing the Brit Trip idea list because that book kept appearing.  Your mention of it was a good reminder to put it on hold.

My kids loved A Series of Unfortunate Events when the books first came out.  They used to argue about who got to read the new one first!

4 minutes ago, Negin said:

Robin, what a fun idea! I've read the Balzac book and my daughter read the Cinder book. We both read these a few years ago. 

I read A Taste of Venice - 3 Stars - Donna Leon’s Brunetti books are fabulous when it comes to food descriptions. If you’re anything like me, and have started to crave some good Italian food while reading them, this is an enjoyable read. It was written by Donna Leon’s best friend and talented cook, Roberta (Biba) Pianaro. 

The other day I decided that I will no longer review a cookbook without trying out at least one recipe. I can’t believe that I didn’t make this rule for myself earlier ! What was I thinking? I mean honestly, I don’t think that it’s right to review a cookbook without trying out at least one recipe! Well, I made an entire meal from the recipes here the other night and everyone was happy. We had Chickpea Balls for the appetizer. Our main course was Lamp Chops with Tomatoes and Basmati Rice. For dessert, we had Oven-Baked Apples with Confectioner’s Custard and Cream. They were delicious. Now, as far as cookbooks go, this book is okay, just not the best. The layout is not as organized as I like cookbooks to be. Also, there are a few recipes that contain ingredients which aren’t available where I live, and may be unavailable to others also. Mind you, this is not only a cookbook. There are excerpts from the Brunetti books, as well as essays with insights into Venetian life. 

Some of my favorite quotes:

"Italian life is filled with food: people talk about it constantly, spend a great deal of time shopping for it and preparing it, and devote a joyous amount of time to eating it. One has but to pay close attention to them when they talk about food, or when they cook and eat, to begin to understand how fundamental it is to the living of a happy life and how vital it is to Italian culture."

“One of the first things that was said to me when I came to Italy forty years ago, speaking not a word of the language, was ‘Mangia, mangia, ti fa bene.’ Eat, eat, it’s good for you.” 

9780434020195.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
Fantastic, couldn't put it down
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable 
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.

 

I think trying the recipes is a great way to review a cookbook!  You meal sounds tasty and the food descriptions in that series are mouth watering.  Like you I am frequently hindered by my ingredient selection in part because I hate to buy an unusual item when the recipe calls for a very small amount of that item.  If we don’t like the recipe I feel like I wasted my money.

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19 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

  In the author’s notes section of one of the Ariana Franklin books that I have been listening to she discusses the fact that she is often criticized for using modern language in her historical settings.  I liked her response to her critics.......in the 12th century her characters were speaking using modern languages so she uses the modern language of her readers to tell her stories. 

Exactly so. What, did her critics also think she should be writing her dialogue using the thorn, eth, and yogh letters?

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5 minutes ago, JennW in SoCal said:

Last night I finished a wonderful Chilean noir mystery, Dark Echoes of the Past by Ramon Diaz Eterovic. It is the only novel of his translated into English, though his books are very popular in Chile. I'd definitely read more of them and think several of you would enjoy this one, though it isn't for the squeamish as there are a few brutal descriptions of the torture tactics used during the Pinochet regime.  But the detective, Heredia is a great character. He writes book reviews when he doesn't have a case, his office/apartment is packed with books and he reads everything from poetry to Dashiell Hammet, and he has a cat.  You also get some wonderful noir atmosphere:

  Quote

I opened one of the windows of my apartment and observed the night time city that, in the light of the moon, had the apparent calm of a lake. The sneaky old lady didn't fool me, though. I knew about the misery and the secrets crouching in the corners, the pain nesting beneath the bridges, the humidity of the tenements, the drunk resignation of those who slept on the sidewalks, the sadness of the streetwalkers by the gates, and the cry of the brat who panhandled on the last bus to nowhere. 

 

I loved it, but decided a "palate cleanser" was in order, so I started reading Three Men in a Boat!

Getting a start on Berkshire already, then? 

Your Chilean noir sounds intriguing. I'll have to keep my eyes open for it.

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6 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

The  Day of the Triffids is my planned selection for Isle of Wight too. :).   I was really excited when doing the Brit Trip idea list because that book kept appearing.  Your mention of it was a good reminder to put it on hold.

My kids loved A Series of Unfortunate Events when the books first came out.  They used to argue about who got to read the new one first!

Oddly, Charles Baudelaire bore a strong resemblance to Neil Patrick' Harris's Count Olaf. 

Speaking of resemblances, I'm told that the speed zombie movie 28 Days Later was based on Day of the Triffids

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A column from the Word Wenches site by author Patricia Rice for all you aspiring writers ~ So You Want to be a Writer?

"I’ve been following a thread in a writer’s group about people who come into writing classes wanting to learn how to be a bestseller. They seem to think all they have to do is take the books that are out there, learn theformula, turn them around a little, polish them up, market them, and whammo, they’re millionaires.

Or they could buy a lottery ticket. The odds would be better.

To anyone out there who thinks writing a book is a ticket to fortune—I’ll tell you the secret formula.

Read every bestselling book in the genre you want to write in. Once you figure out your story, then you need to develop characters and plot and get all your notes down on paper. Next, research the setting, the plot turns, the personalities that fit the story, and all the little details that make the story come alive. If you work at this full time, and you have a really active imagination, that first draft should only take a year or two...."
**
A currently free book for Kindle readers ~  Ellen the Harpist  by Diane Michaels
 
and here's a link to a review of the book from the Dear Author's site ~ REVIEW: Ellen the Harpist by Diane Michaels
 
Regards,
Kareni
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26 minutes ago, JennW in SoCal said:

Last night I finished a wonderful Chilean noir mystery, Dark Echoes of the Past by Ramon Diaz Eterovic. It is the only novel of his translated into English, though his books are very popular in Chile. I'd definitely read more of them and think several of you would enjoy this one, though it isn't for the squeamish as there are a few brutal descriptions of the torture tactics used during the Pinochet regime.  But the detective, Heredia is a great character. He writes book reviews when he doesn't have a case, his office/apartment is packed with books and he reads everything from poetry to Dashiell Hammet, and he has a cat.  You also get some wonderful noir atmosphere:

  Quote

I opened one of the windows of my apartment and observed the night time city that, in the light of the moon, had the apparent calm of a lake. The sneaky old lady didn't fool me, though. I knew about the misery and the secrets crouching in the corners, the pain nesting beneath the bridges, the humidity of the tenements, the drunk resignation of those who slept on the sidewalks, the sadness of the streetwalkers by the gates, and the cry of the brat who panhandled on the last bus to nowhere. 

 

I loved it, but decided a "palate cleanser" was in order, so I started reading Three Men in a Boat!

Chilean noir looks like something I would enjoy.  I have now investigated my library options and think I need to give this a few months.  Since the translation appears to be recent I can’t even seem to do an overdrive recommendation on it even though it is on Kindle.

15 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

Oddly, Charles Baudelaire bore a strong resemblance to Neil Patrick' Harris's Count Olaf. 

Speaking of resemblances, I'm told that the speed zombie movie 28 Days Later was based on Day of the Triffids

I have also investigated 28 Days Later and suspect that the movie is more horror than I can handle visually.  That being said it has a Doctor Who in it.  I really liked Eccleston as the Doctor......I know I am a minority in that.  

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Robin, your opening post brought back memories of our early homeschooling days. We used (with adaptation) Five in a Row for a while when ds was young. A Pair of Red Clogs was one of the books but had gone out of print at that time (I'm pretty sure it's back). People would excitedly post on their forum if they found it at a thrift store, garage sale, etc. I found a well worn copy at our local school book depository and was so excited. You used to be able to go there and get discarded books for free. There were also plenty of complaints about people selling it (and other OOP FIAR books) on eBay for outrageous prices. Thank you for that little trip down memory lane. :) <3  <-----That's a smile and a heart. I wish we'd get emoticons back. 

The thread on the chat board asking for book club book ideas sent me to my library's Overdrive to look for Isaac''s Storm, which they had and I promptly checked out. Dh and I saw a documentary years ago that covered much of what's in this book, including the arrogance of American weather forecasters, but the opening pages grabbed me even though I know the story.

Other currently reading titles -

Fiction-

The Cider House Rules - audio book. I've never seen the movie so the story is completely new to me.

Middlemarch - I'm in Book 5 and still loving it. 

Emma - still rereading

Non-fiction -  All of the following I find interesting but not riveting so I'm working through them slowly

A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress

Flies in the Ointment: Essays on Supplements, Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (SCAM)

Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors

 

We've got some heavy thunderstorms heading our way and the rain just started. I think I'm going to open Emma and enjoy some comfort reading to the sound of rain and thunder. It might be more appropriate to read the book about the hurricane, but I'd rather read fiction when it's stormy. 

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This is the first time I am posting on this thread since the boards got updated.

I have read:

Away  by Jane Urquhart

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satripi.  This is a graphic novel and I read the first book but later I noticed there are three more books so I plan to read the next one at least because I enjoyed it.  It's the true story of a girl who grows up in Iran in the 1970s/80s.

Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone by Brene Brown.  Although I agreed with her thoughts I wish she provided more concrete examples. 

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman.  I am almost finished this and it had been slow reading because I had to force myself to get through this.  This book was just not for me.

 

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Hello, BaWers! It's snowing here; we have about two inches. Yesterday, it was 68 degrees on campus and 36 degrees back home. Crazy weather! Good for reading, though, right?

This week, I finished three books, reaching 41 to date:

  • The Female Persuasion (Meg Wolitzer; 2018. Fiction.)
  • If We Were Villains (M.L. Rio; 2017. Fiction.)
  • American Kingpin (Nick Bilton; 2017. Non-fiction)

I thought the Wolitzer was a little bloated but worthwhile. I wish I could say the same of Villains, which read like a cheap Secret History knock-off. My husband and I really liked Bilton's account of the cyber-hunt for Ross Ulbricht, the Dread Pirate Roberts behind the darknet's Silk Road, though -- seriously good non-fiction. As a sort of related follow-up, we're now reading The Idealist: Aaron Swartz and the Rise of Free Culture (2016). (One of my reading goals for this year is to complete at least 36 non-fiction titles. At only nine to date, I'm a wee bit behind, but I remain optimistic. I wish I could say the same about my poetry goals. *chuckle*) I will finish Fractured (Catherine McKenzie; 2016), an-easy-to-digest, Sunday-afternoon sort of novel later tonight, and then continue with Amy Goldstein's Janesville: An American Story.

Off to catch up on what everyone else is reading....

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This week I read The Heart is a Shifting Sea; Love and Marriage in Mumbai, by Elizabeth Flock.  Flock is a journalist who started her career at Forbes India and then returned years later to write a book about Indian marriages.  She tells the stories of three different couples -- all middle-class, but also of varying religious and professional backgrounds -- and how teir marriages illustrate how so much in India is changing, so quickly.  It's an amazing work of reporting and just a terrific read.  

Negin, I completely agree with you about cookbooks.  I will now only buy a cookbook after I have previously checked it out of the library and tried some of the recipes.  

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Hi everyone!

Miss Tonks Turns to Crime: A Novel of Regency England by Marion Chesney Audio version read by Davina Porter - fun listen.

The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton This novel sounded really good with a young, naive bride going to live in her older husband's home in 17th century Amsterdam with his older sister, servants, and secrets galore. The premise reminded me of Daphne DuMaurier's Rebecca but that's as far as it went. The book went a thousand different ways and didn't really resolve much. I've heard there is a movie (or maybe tv?) version coming out so wanted to read it before then but now I'm just meh and don't really care. 

Parnassus on Wheels by Christopher Morley I enjoyed this good-natured story about a middle aged woman finding love in an unusual, bookish way.  I liked this quote  :)  


"I say," he rejoined, "how old do you think I am, anyway? Only forty-one, by the bones of Byron! Henry VIII was only forty-one when he married Anne Boleyn. There are many consolations in history for people over forty! Remember that when you get there.

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2 hours ago, Kareni said:

Some bookish gifts ~

 

“Backwards and in High Heels”: Books About the Women Of Golden Age Musicals  by Daisy Johnson

Regards,
Kareni

 

The bios about Debbie Reynolds and Adele Astair both look good! 

45 minutes ago, JennyD said:

This week I read The Heart is a Shifting Sea; Love and Marriage in Mumbai, by Elizabeth Flock.  Flock is a journalist who started her career at Forbes India and then returned years later to write a book about Indian marriages.  She tells the stories of three different couples -- all middle-class, but also of varying religious and professional backgrounds -- and how teir marriages illustrate how so much in India is changing, so quickly.  It's an amazing work of reporting and just a terrific read.  

Negin, I completely agree with you about cookbooks.  I will now only buy a cookbook after I have previously checked it out of the library and tried some of the recipes.  

 

I learned this the hard way and have made it a rule for several years now!

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9 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

Robin, your opening post brought back memories of our early homeschooling days. We used (with adaptation) Five in a Row for a while when ds was young. A Pair of Red Clogs was one of the books but had gone out of print at that time (I'm pretty sure it's back). People would excitedly post on their forum if they found it at a thrift store, garage sale, etc. I found a well worn copy at our local school book depository and was so excited. You used to be able to go there and get discarded books for free. There were also plenty of complaints about people selling it (and other OOP FIAR books) on eBay for outrageous prices. Thank you for that little trip down memory lane. :) <3  <-----That's a smile and a heart. I wish we'd get emoticons back.

Hey, we did too!  I love all the books we read found through Five in a Row.  We were just talking about it the other day.  Still have them all including A Pair of Red Clogs.  We would read them over and over again. Packed away in his closet currently.  James didn’t want me to get rid of any of them when we cleaned out his shelves.  

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On 15/04/2018 at 2:33 AM, Penguin said:

I've been looking around for what I want to read to fill up my Bingo Card. I don't like mysteries (please don't hate me!), so I wanted to find a non-mystery for Cozy. I just discovered Miss Read. Have any of you read her? They look very cozy but are not mysteries. I think I will give her a try.

I've been working my way, slowly,  through her Thrush Green series.  I think they are an enjoyable English village read and would be perfect for a non-mystery Cozy (imo  :D)

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FIAR  titles and A Pair of Red Clogs in particular  - what a fond rush of memories

Posting this. then heading to bed (early morning here :-/ ).

Completed :

  • Battles at Thrush Green: Bk4 ~ Miss Read  (3.5)  “English village” in the Cotswold Gloucestershire
  • Unashamed:  Rahab ~ Francine Rivers   (5)   Bible based fiction.  
  • The Unexpected Guest ~ Agatha Christie   (4) Wales…  so doesn’t count for our Brit Trip, does it?
  • The Valley of the Shadow: A Cornish Mystery Bk3 ~ Carola Dunn  (4)  Cornwall
  • Buried in the Country: Cornish Mystery Bk4 ~ Carola Dunn  (4)  Others may like to know that while there is some cursing in each book there are no f-bombs.
  • The Richest Man in Babylon ~ George S. Clason    (3.5) N/F  recommended read by Jay.  Completing this is one that comes with a sense of achievement as I’ve been chipping away at this book, on and off,  for about a year.  One take away gem was about Luck standing for Labour Under Correct Knowledge.
  • A Circle of Quiet ~ Madeleine L'engle       N/F   USA  (epukapuka copy)  (4.5)  Interesting and thought-provoking read. Some of her thoughts are diametrically opposite to my own (developing) beliefs.   As an aside, I came away a little unsure of whether L’engle came to believe in God or not?    She says early on in the book (pg147 of the e.book)  I was earnestly explaining to the young minister that I did not believe in God, “but I’ve discovered that I can’t live as though I didn’t believe in him.  As I long as I don’t need to say any more than that I try to live as though I believe in God, I would very much like to come to church – if you’ll let me.”
  • The Winter Garden: Daisy # 2 ~ Carola Dunn     Cheshire  (Dropped)  Though the narrator is a gifted voice actor, in this book she is “trying’ to be British.   Ghastly listen !!  I cannot get this through our library as a book, or ebook, yet, so I’m abandoning it.

Other than my (snail-paced) sip reading titles these are my current reads:

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33 minutes ago, tuesdayschild said:

FIAR  titles and A Pair of Red Clogs in particular  - what a fond rush of memories

Posting this. then heading to bed (early morning here :-/ ).

Completed :

  • Battles at Thrush Green: Bk4 ~ Miss Read  (3.5)  “English village” in the Cotswold Gloucestershire
  • Unashamed:  Rahab ~ Francine Rivers   (5)   Bible based fiction.  
  • The Unexpected Guest ~ Agatha Christie   (4) Wales…  so doesn’t count for our Brit Trip, does it?
  • The Valley of the Shadow: A Cornish Mystery Bk3 ~ Carola Dunn  (4)  Cornwall
  • Buried in the Country: Cornish Mystery Bk4 ~ Carola Dunn  (4)  Others may like to know that while there is some cursing in each book there are no f-bombs.
  • The Richest Man in Babylon ~ George S. Clason    (3.5) N/F  recommended read by Jay.  Completing this is one that comes with a sense of achievement as I’ve been chipping away at this book, on and off,  for about a year.  One take away gem was about Luck standing for Labour Under Correct Knowledge.
  • A Circle of Quiet ~ Madeleine L'engle       N/F   USA  (epukapuka copy)  (4.5)  Interesting and thought-provoking read. Some of her thoughts are diametrically opposite to my own (developing) beliefs.   As an aside, I came away a little unsure of whether L’engle came to believe in God or not?    She says early on in the book (pg147 of the e.book)  I was earnestly explaining to the young minister that I did not believe in God, “but I’ve discovered that I can’t live as though I didn’t believe in him.  As I long as I don’t need to say any more than that I try to live as though I believe in God, I would very much like to come to church – if you’ll let me.”
  • The Winter Garden: Daisy # 2 ~ Carola Dunn     Cheshire  (Dropped)  Though the narrator is a gifted voice actor, in this book she is “trying’ to be British.   Ghastly listen !!  I cannot get this through our library as a book, or ebook, yet, so I’m abandoning it.

Other than my (snail-paced) sip reading titles these are my current reads:

First, one book set in Wales is part of the Cadfael level on the Detective bus.  Personally I am just making a note to put with my final count.

Carola Dunn's Cornish series......I read the first when it first came out a thought it was OK.  Since they aren't available in my overdrive I haven't read more.  Maybe I will try to get the second for Cornwall.  Regarding The Winter Garden, if it's any consultation I don't think much happens.  All I remember is ice skating.  

Regarding the Madeleine L'Engle quote.....From how I read your quote I don't think she did believe in God she just wanted to join the community of those who attend a church, that chuch.    I really hope I have said that in a way that doesn't upset anyone.

I finished Hangman Blind https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4320305-hangman-blind and enjoyed it.  I learned quite a bit about Yorkshire history that I don't remember encountering elsewhere thanks to all my googling of place names.  On of my new bits of knowledge......  Villages were reclaimed by the sea in the 14th Century off the coast near Hull\Spurn Point.  There actually have not been that many missing villages in the history of the UK  beyond the ones in reservoirs so it seems significant to me.

My needed CS Harris has appeared in Overdrive!  I got a good start this morning and can hopefully finish before I lose the latest release.

 

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Work is slowing down a bit (for the moment) so I have time to read the thread early in the week, but life is getting hectic so I'm not getting much reading done!

My main reading goals right now are to keep on reading Outlander - but in French.  The first two chapters were slow going but once she got flung back into the past, things picked up.  I'm 200 pages in.  I do somewhat wish that I hadn't picked such a chunky book for my first read in French for 3 or 4 years but it's holding my interest.  This is one of those situations where I can't decide if I wish I was reading it on a kindle/kobo/whatever - there's a fair selection of words that I can guess by context and then a fair selection of words that I can't guess by context but I can still figure out the overall meaning of the sentence, so I haven't bothered looking anything up.  Not sure if having the ability to highlight a word and find the translation would help or if that would hinder the flow of reading.

I'm also reading A Passage to India as my 'on the bus' book, which I was hesitant to do, but figured was worth a shot.  I was afraid it would require too much concentration to work as I only get 15-20 minutes of reading time on the bus and that can sometimes make the experience a bit more disjointed than I'd prefer.  It's working better than I expected and when I finish that, I'll have finished Shelf #2.  

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Some currently free books for Kindle readers ~

Boys   by Scott Semegran

"The writing is sharp and unpretentiously thoughtful... An endearing collection that deftly captures the need for youthful fellowship." -- Kirkus Reviews
**

Witness Protection  by Holly Copella
**

Several books by author Denise Grover Swank

Family Jewels: Rose Gardner Investigations #1

Center Stage: Magnolia Steele Mystery #1

The Substitute: The Wedding Pact #1

Regards,
Kareni

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I just finished the book I've been reading for my book group ~ Orhan's Inheritance  by Aline Ohanesian.  I found this to be a very quick read though it dealt with a heavy subject, namely the Armenian genocide that took place about a hundred years ago.  While I found the story poignant, I didn't feel touched by it.  It's not uncommon for me to get teary eyed when reading a book, but that did not happen with this book.  Tat said, I look forward to discussing it with my group on Thursday.

"When Orhan’s brilliant and eccentric grandfather, Kemal Türkoglu, who built a dynasty out of making kilim rugs, is found dead, submerged in a vat of dye, Orhan inherits the decades-old business. But Kemal has left the family estate to a stranger thousands of miles away, an aging woman in a retirement home in Los Angeles. Intent on righting this injustice, Orhan unearths a story that, if told, has the power to undo the legacy upon which Orhan’s family is built, a story that could unravel his own future."

Regards,
Kareni

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22 hours ago, mumto2 said:

First, one book set in Wales is part of the Cadfael level on the Detective bus.  Personally I am just making a note to put with my final count.

Carola Dunn's Cornish series......I read the first when it first came out a thought it was OK.  Since they aren't available in my overdrive I haven't read more.  Maybe I will try to get the second for Cornwall.  Regarding The Winter Garden, if it's any consultation I don't think much happens.  All I remember is ice skating.  

Regarding the Madeleine L'Engle quote.....From how I read your quote I don't think she did believe in God she just wanted to join the community of those who attend a church, that chuch.    I really hope I have said that in a way that doesn't upset anyone.

I finished Hangman Blind https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4320305-hangman-blind and enjoyed it.  I learned quite a bit about Yorkshire history that I don't remember encountering elsewhere thanks to all my googling of place names.  On of my new bits of knowledge......  Villages were reclaimed by the sea in the 14th Century off the coast near Hull\Spurn Point.  There actually have not been that many missing villages in the history of the UK  beyond the ones in reservoirs so it seems significant to me.

My needed CS Harris has appeared in Overdrive!  I got a good start this morning and can hopefully finish before I lose the latest release.

 

(small blush)  I mentally mislaid that pertinent details since I'm definitely a rebel bus rider.

The Cornish mysteries seem more enjoyable via audio, and, bk1 was just an ok listen for me too.   

Yes, that's how I read the L'Engle quote too.

ETA:  thanks for the comment about the Carola Dunn book I dropped - seems I'm not missing much then :-)

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Hello All - Enjoying reading your updates as usual!  

I finally finished Mansfield Park.  I realized I had seen at least one (maybe two?) tv adaptations but had never read it, and it fit in for Brit-Tripping.  I enjoyed it though it was a little slow going for me at times.  I read an annotated edition which added to my enjoyment.  

I also listened to a couple of fun detective stories, the first two in the Barker and Llewelyn series by Will Thomas (Some Danger Involved and To Kingdom Come).  They were pleasant;  not terribly suspenseful but I enjoyed the characters.  I listened to them back-to-back only because I needed audiobooks and they were what was available to me at the time. I'll probably go on with the series at some point.

I'm up to 8 counties but am all over the place, missing all the buses.  Still having so much fun!

Next  up on audio is Venetia  by Georgette Heyer for York (I'm pretty sure). I'm a little disappointed though. I saw that Hoopla has an edition narrated by Richard Armitage who has a wonderful voice... but then I saw that it is abridged.  Hugely abridged, apparently: it was a little less than 5 hours, and the unabridged (narrated by Phyllida Nash is 12 1/2 hours!  So I downloaded the full book.

I'm also listening to Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine which I hope to finish today, and reading The Nature Fix and The Power of Habit because, whoa, no nonfiction yet this year, and making progress on my long-term reads, ESV Bible and War and Peace!

 

Oh, and add me as other FIAR lover.  We got A Pair of Red Clogs from the library, and enjoyed it, but never tried to buy it. We did buy some of the books, and have all of those packed away.  Miss those days...

 

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On 4/15/2018 at 3:00 PM, mumto2 said:

 That being said it has a Doctor Who in it.  I really liked Eccleston as the Doctor......I know I am a minority in that.  

He was always my favorite. There was something charming about how goofy he was.

 

On 4/15/2018 at 6:14 PM, Teaching3bears said:

 

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman.  I am almost finished this and it had been slow reading because I had to force myself to get through this.  This book was just not for me.

 

Have you read any of his other books?

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6 hours ago, marbel said:

 

I'm up to 8 counties but am all over the place, missing all the buses.  Still having so much fun!

Next  up on audio is Venetia  by Georgette Heyer for York (I'm pretty sure). I'm a little disappointed though. I saw that Hoopla has an edition narrated by Richard Armitage who has a wonderful voice... but then I saw that it is abridged.  Hugely abridged, apparently: it was a little less than 5 hours, and the unabridged (narrated by Phyllida Nash is 12 1/2 hours!  So I downloaded the full book.

I'm also listening to Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine which I hope to finish today, and reading The Nature Fix and The Power of Habit because, whoa, no nonfiction yet this year, and making progress on my long-term reads, ESV Bible and War and Peace!

 

 

Marbel - Shhhh. Don't tell anyone but I missed the bus and am still in Yorkshire. Seems like there's a million books to read there and they've all been great. Glad your enjoying your Brit Tripping.

I just got The Nature Fix from the library today. It's a ways down on my nightstand though so we'll see when I get to it.

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On 4/15/2018 at 4:00 PM, mumto2 said:

 

I have also investigated 28 Days Later and suspect that the movie is more horror than I can handle visually.  That being said it has a Doctor Who in it.  I really liked Eccleston as the Doctor......I know I am a minority in that.  

I didn't dislike Eccleston but you know what they say. You never forget your first Doctor. David Tennant was my first doctor. :) 

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Eccleston was my (and my family's) first doctor and we do love him a lot.  Hard to beat David Tennant, but they could be tied for best. (I also loved Peter Capaldi but did not like the stories much... we are kind of off Dr Who now.)

I just finished Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. I listened while emptying out my fridge  because the freezer compartment was warmish this morning and then the fridge part started warming up too.  Silver lining, mindless chores give time for listening to audiobooks.  Really enjoyed this complicated story that is by turns funny, heartbreaking, and horrifying.  

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4 hours ago, aggieamy said:

He was always my favorite. There was something charming about how goofy he was.

 

Have you read any of his other books?

 

3 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

I didn't dislike Eccleston but you know what they say. You never forget your first Doctor. David Tennant was my first doctor. :) 

 

3 hours ago, marbel said:

Eccleston was my (and my family's) first doctor and we do love him a lot.  Hard to beat David Tennant, but they could be tied for best. (I also loved Peter Capaldi but did not like the stories much... we are kind of off Dr Who now.)

I just finished Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. I listened while emptying out my fridge  because the freezer compartment was warmish this morning and then the fridge part started warming up too.  Silver lining, mindless chores give time for listening to audiobooks.  Really enjoyed this complicated story that is by turns funny, heartbreaking, and horrifying.  

I love seeing all the Eccleston adoration here.  I really have never encountered so many irl!  You all are my friends for a reason!  :)   I read or listened to an interview with him recently where he says he now wishes he had stayed in the role another year or two. :(  For some reason I liked Rose with him the best.  I also like Tennant and love his seasons.

I cracked up at Kathy's you never forget your first Doctor because I certainly have.  Suspect it must have been Tom Baker........hubby watched Doctor Who on PBS  back when we first were married so 30 years ago and Baker was on forever.  On my scale of favourite Doctors Baker really rates middle of the road!  If anyone has a chance to watch the new Shada  where animation has been used to fill in all the missing unfilmed parts of was great.  I have watched it a more than once.  Great Cambridge setting.

I just finished listening to Christie's The Big Four with Hugh Frasier.  It was wonderful.  I did not like it when I read it years ago but found it a clever book when listening.  Totally loving the Christie challenge!  Thanks Robin!!!

 

Edited by mumto2
Autocorrect errors
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Add me to the list of fans of Eccleston as the Doctor. He is my favorite though I loved David Tennant, too, and while I tried to like the more recent Doctors, the writing has been awful. Just too busy. I hear Steven Moffat is stepping down as show runner, so there is hope the series can regain its footing. (I think Moffat also ruined the Benedict Cumberbatch Sherlock series...)

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This will interest some here, I'm certain.

Amazon Publishing is offering nine free Kindle books as part of their Read The World promotion. The books are, apparently, bestsellers in their native language and have been translated to English. Here is the link:

https://www.amazon.com/article/read-the-world

Regards,
Kareni

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48 minutes ago, JennW in SoCal said:

Add me to the list of fans of Eccleston as the Doctor. He is my favorite though I loved David Tennant, too, and while I tried to like the more recent Doctors, the writing has been awful. Just too busy. I hear Steven Moffat is stepping down as show runner, so there is hope the series can regain its footing. (I think Moffat also ruined the Benedict Cumberbatch Sherlock series...)

Me too though I suspect you and I will have to go underground to escape the angry mob with pitchforks that will be pursuing us shortly.

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This afternoon I finished Oliver Twist, removing it at last from my Shame List. Even reading it quickly, there was time for two people to express their disbelief that I'd never read it before. Full of course of famous literary moments: "Please sir, I want some more"; the description of Smithfield on a market morning; "The law is a ass"; the Artful Dodger, Fagin, Bill Sikes. It was strange reading a book I'd never read but knowing so much of it.

Anyway while this is an out-of-order reading, it's going to count for London next time the BritTrip bus heads that way. Time to move on to Dorset. Why, hello Mr. Hardy...!

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I recently finished  Bones Bundle  by Kim Fielding which includes three novels and a story. (Adult content)  Kim Fielding is a favorite author of mine, and I enjoyed all of the works.   

"Skinny, quiet hipster Dylan Warner just wants to live a normal life—despite being a werewolf—but when he buys an isolated farmhouse, it comes with more adventure than he anticipated! In Good Bones, Dylan’s sexy neighbor Chris Nock helps Dylan renovate the house, but how can Dylan reveal his furry secret? In Buried Bones, a brand-new relationship is hard enough to handle, but the appearance of a ghost and Chris’s dad threaten to bring Dylan and Chris’s relationship toppling. In The Gig, a chance encounter introduces Dylan and Chris to Drew Clifton and Travis Miller of Speechless. In Bone Dry, artist Ery Phillips is house-sitting for Dylan and Chris when a strange—and beautiful—man appears by the pond and inspires his muse."

I also re-read with pleasure Lord of the Fading Lands (The Tairen Soul Book 1)  by C. L. Wilson; this is a fantasy with an element of romance.

"Once, driven wild with grief over the murder of his beloved, the majestic Fey King Rain Tairen Soul had laid waste to the world before vanishing into the Fading Lands. Now, a thousand years later, a new threat draws him back into the world—and a new love reawakens the heart he thought long dead.

Ellysetta, a woodcarver’s daughter, calls to Rain in a way no other ever had. Mysterious and magical, her soul beckons him with a compelling, seductive song—and no matter the cost, the wildness in his blood will not be denied.

As an ancient, familiar evil regains its strength, causing centuries-old alliances to crumble and threatening doom for Rain and his people... he must claim his truemate to embrace the destiny woven for them both in the mists of time."

Regards,
Kareni

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2 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Me too though I suspect you and I will have to go underground to escape the angry mob with pitchforks that will be pursuing us shortly.

Is there room in your bunker for one more?

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6 hours ago, aggieamy said:

He was always my favorite. There was something charming about how goofy he was.

 

Have you read any of his other books?

 

No, Neverwhere is the first Neil Gaiman book I have read.  Are his other books different?  

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On 16/04/2018 at 7:01 AM, JennW in SoCal said:

I loved it, but decided a "palate cleanser" was in order, so I started reading Three Men in a Boat!

1

My son really enjoys your "palate cleanser", Three Men in a Boat, and I was telling him - hinting -  I'd be enjoying the book more if I was listening to it with someone. He assured me I'm doing fine on my own ;-p        Resharing the counties in this book for others Brit Trippers: London/ Chesire/ Buckinghamshire/ Surrey/ Berkshire/ Dorset/ Oxfordshire.       I'm close to finishing TMiaB and then Dd and I are going to listen to the Connie Willis title,  To Say Nothing of the Dog: Or How We Found the Bishop's Bird Stump at Last: Bk2 , another Baw mention a while back. 

Thanks to another BaW-er :-D  I picked up an overdrive book I would never normally select on my own, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry ~ Rachel Joyce    (County harvesting read:  Devon / Bristol / Glouchesterhire/ Burmingham/ London/ Derbyshire/ Leeds, Yorkshire? / South Yorkshire/ North Yorkshire/ Durham/ Northumberland).     The book contains some pretty raw, gritty, life scenarios and choices, and, the swearing sinks into f-bombs, which was easier to skip in printed format.   I can't say I liked this book - I don't, I think - yet it's one of those books  I'm glad I read as it's very thought generating and I know will stay with me for a long time.  

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7 hours ago, Teaching3bears said:

 

No, Neverwhere is the first Neil Gaiman book I have read.  Are his other books different?  

If you are still intrigued by Gaiman, it would be worth trying another book. I have adored some of his books (Stardust and The Graveyard Book), been neutral on others (Norse Mythology) and I could barely make it through Neverwhere. I kept thinking it would get better, but for me it never did. The only thing I really liked about Neverwhere was the setting.

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1 hour ago, Penguin said:

If you are still intrigued by Gaiman, it would be worth trying another book. I have adored some of his books (Stardust and The Graveyard Book), been neutral on others (Norse Mythology) and I could barely make it through Neverwhere. I kept thinking it would get better, but for me it never did. The only thing I really liked about Neverwhere was the setting.

I agree!  I never managed to finish Neverwhere.  I bought it at an airport because of Kindle failure and tried to read it but watched movies instead.  Dd picked it up at some point and liked it but she is truly a Gaiman fangirl .    I listened to The Graveyard Book recently and loved it.  I plan to try another later this year.

Tuesday.....thanks for listing all the counties for Three Men and a Boat again.  Now that I have realised that Goodreads will let me put them all in I will.  ;)

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Checking in - I've had trouble concentrating on anything more difficult than fluff romances lately, and I hope that my brain returns soon. 

46. One Night for Love, Mary Balogh (Dorset, London)

47. Silent in the Grave, Deanna Raybourn (London) - great opening sentences! "To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband's dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor."

48. Romancing the Duke, Tessa Dare (Northumberland) - a very silly, quick read

49. When a Scot Ties the Knot, Tessa Dare (Sussex, Scotland) - same series as Romancing the Duke, less silly, but still a quick read

50. Silent in the Sanctuary, Deanna Raybourn (Sussex) - I thought that this was the best of the series, but they are all very good

51. The Proposal, Mary Balogh (Cornwall, Dorset, London) - a reversal of the non-noble woman swept away by noble man, plus this series (Survivors) explores the lasting damage of the Napoleonic wars.

52. The Arrangement, Mary Balogh (Gloucestershire, London, Somerset)

53. A  Summer to Remember, Mary Balogh (Hampshire, London)

54. The Escape, Mary Balogh

55. The Heir, Grace Burrowes

56. Dangerous to Know, Tasha Alexander 

57. Silent on the Moor, Deanna Raybourn (London, Yorkshire)

58. Only Enchanting, Mary Balogh (Gloucestershire, London, Sussex)

59. Someone to Hold, Mary Balogh (Somerset) - the author took an unlikable secondary character from the first book, showed her journey of self-reflection and growth, and made her lovable

60. Face Down in the Marrow-Bone Pie, by Kathy Lynn Emerson (Kent, Lancashire, Manchester)

61. Only a Promise, Mary Balogh (London, Sussex)

62. Dark Road to Darjeeling, Deanna Raybourn 

63. Only a Kiss, Mary Balogh (Cornwall, London)

64. Just Like Heaven, Julia Quinn (Cambridgeshire, London) *Red Shoe on Cover Challenge* - a fun, light-hearted book. I intend to read more in this series.

I am enjoying the Survivors series by Mary Balogh, and thought that Imogen's story in "Only a Kiss" was pretty powerful. Conversely, I am wearying of young, beautiful, and widowed Victorian Lady sleuths, and especially of Lady Julia and Brisbane's relationship, so I will be taking a break from the Lady Emily and Lady Julia Grey series. I picked up Murder at Mansfield Park yesterday and read the first chapter. I decided to put it up for now, as I was having trouble tracking all of the known Mansfield Park characters being in new roles. Maybe I'll try it again another time, so I'm not listing it as Abandoned yet.

Currently Reading or On Deck:

A Plague on Both Your Houses, by Susanna Gregory - I am really enjoying this one so far, about 1/4 through the book.

A Night Like This, by Julia Quinn - second book in the Smythe-Smith quartet.

Lady Fortescue Steps Out, by M.C. Beaton

What Angels Fear, by C.S. Harris - I'll start this one after I finish the Susanna Gregory book, as I can't keep track of two mysteries at once. I've been looking forward to trying this one.

Plus many of what a previous poster called sip reads - thank you for introducing that phrase, it fits my reading perfectly!

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15 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Me too though I suspect you and I will have to go underground to escape the angry mob with pitchforks that will be pursuing us shortly.

 

12 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

Is there room in your bunker for one more?

 

Scootch over, I'm joining you guys.

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1 hour ago, Cascadia said:

Checking in - I've had trouble concentrating on anything more difficult than fluff romances lately, and I hope that my brain returns soon. 

46. One Night for Love, Mary Balogh (Dorset, London)

47. Silent in the Grave, Deanna Raybourn (London) - great opening sentences! "To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband's dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor."

48. Romancing the Duke, Tessa Dare (Northumberland) - a very silly, quick read

49. When a Scot Ties the Knot, Tessa Dare (Sussex, Scotland) - same series as Romancing the Duke, less silly, but still a quick read

50. Silent in the Sanctuary, Deanna Raybourn (Sussex) - I thought that this was the best of the series, but they are all very good

51. The Proposal, Mary Balogh (Cornwall, Dorset, London) - a reversal of the non-noble woman swept away by noble man, plus this series (Survivors) explores the lasting damage of the Napoleonic wars.

52. The Arrangement, Mary Balogh (Gloucestershire, London, Somerset)

53. A  Summer to Remember, Mary Balogh (Hampshire, London)

54. The Escape, Mary Balogh

55. The Heir, Grace Burrowes

56. Dangerous to Know, Tasha Alexander 

57. Silent on the Moor, Deanna Raybourn (London, Yorkshire)

58. Only Enchanting, Mary Balogh (Gloucestershire, London, Sussex)

59. Someone to Hold, Mary Balogh (Somerset) - the author took an unlikable secondary character from the first book, showed her journey of self-reflection and growth, and made her lovable

60. Face Down in the Marrow-Bone Pie, by Kathy Lynn Emerson (Kent, Lancashire, Manchester)

61. Only a Promise, Mary Balogh (London, Sussex)

62. Dark Road to Darjeeling, Deanna Raybourn 

63. Only a Kiss, Mary Balogh (Cornwall, London)

64. Just Like Heaven, Julia Quinn (Cambridgeshire, London) *Red Shoe on Cover Challenge* - a fun, light-hearted book. I intend to read more in this series.

I am enjoying the Survivors series by Mary Balogh, and thought that Imogen's story in "Only a Kiss" was pretty powerful. Conversely, I am wearying of young, beautiful, and widowed Victorian Lady sleuths, and especially of Lady Julia and Brisbane's relationship, so I will be taking a break from the Lady Emily and Lady Julia Grey series. I picked up Murder at Mansfield Park yesterday and read the first chapter. I decided to put it up for now, as I was having trouble tracking all of the known Mansfield Park characters being in new roles. Maybe I'll try it again another time, so I'm not listing it as Abandoned yet.

Currently Reading or On Deck:

A Plague on Both Your Houses, by Susanna Gregory - I am really enjoying this one so far, about 1/4 through the book.

A Night Like This, by Julia Quinn - second book in the Smythe-Smith quartet.

Lady Fortescue Steps Out, by M.C. Beaton

What Angels Fear, by C.S. Harris - I'll start this one after I finish the Susanna Gregory book, as I can't keep track of two mysteries at once. I've been looking forward to trying this one.

Plus many of what a previous poster called sip reads - thank you for introducing that phrase, it fits my reading perfectly!

I think I have read (and loved) every single book on your list except for the Susannah Gregory.   Those seem to be hard for me to find.   I am looking forward to your opinion on the CS Harris.  Also thanks for the county info.  I will update in Goodreads soon.

 

Btw,  I LOVE Julia Quinn.  I am probably rereading her book for Red Shoe also.  

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Finished last night (instead of sleeping; how I love middle age!) Charles Baudelaire's Intimate Journals, a posthumously published collection of his papers. Much of this consists of a section called "My Heart Laid Bare," full of opinionated and often cryptic thoughts that passed through his head. One must read these keeping in mind that he was in his early 20s and French.

Quote

One must work, if not from inclination at least from despair, since, as I have fully proved, to work is less wearisome than to amuse oneself.

 

Quote

Belief in Progress is a doctrine of idlers and Belgians.


Baudelaire really had it in for Belgians. Also for George Sand:

Quote

The woman Sand is the Prudhomme of immorality.
She has always been a moralist.
Only she used to work as an anti-moralist.
She has never been an artist. She has that celebrated flowing style, so dear to the bourgeois.
She is stupid, she is clumsy, and she is a chatterbox. She has, in her moral concepts, the same profundity of judgment and delicacy of feeling as a concierge or a kept woman.
What she says about her mother.
What she says about Poetry.
Her love for the working classes.
It is indeed a proof of the degradation of the men of this century that several have been capable of falling in love with this latrine.
See the preface to Mademoiselle La Quintinie, in which she pretends that true Christians do not believe in Hell.
Sand represents the God of decent folk, the god of concierges and thieving servants.
She has good reasons for wishing to abolish Hell.

 

Quote

After all, the supreme glory of Napoleon III, in the eyes of History and of the French people, will have been to prove that anybody can govern a great nation as soon as they have got control of the telegraph and the national press.

(I swear when I first read that, I read "telegraph" as "twitter.")

Having finished my private little "Lemony Snicket" mini-challenge, I need to get reading on the Ovid I'm supposed to be doing with Middle Girl, and fit in Far From the Madding Crowd. Maybe in that lovely 2 to 4 a.m. slot again.

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4 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

 Maybe in that lovely 2 to 4 a.m. slot again.

My favorite reading time slot seems to be the 3 To 5 am.   It’s terrible that my going to bed routine includes making sure I have a device charged to handle significant reading in the dark.  Hugs

Btw, I enjoyed the quotes......

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Oh, yes. My favorite thing about my Kindle is that I can read it in bed and not wake DH.

I was reading Lingua Latina at 4 a.m. this morning (but not on the Kindle). Ugh.

We went to a really interesting talk last night at the local college: "Monuments, Wars, and Monument Wars: Memorializing the Civil War." The speaker is an Art Historian prof, and he did a great job bringing up things to think about rather than telling the audience what to think. I really want to read one of the books he mentioned in his talk, Written in Stone: Public Monuments in Changing Societies. I had seen in before in one of the national battlefield bookshops, and thought it looked good.

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