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mermaid'smom

I have the CRAZIEST update that may help some of you!!!

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Mermaid'smom, one book I have personally found useful is Dr. Kenneth Bock's book *Healing the New Childhood Epidemics*. It is a book I read early on in our journey and is a book I refer back to. Anyway, I'm linking this from Google books. I hope this works as it is a book I have as a printed copy and I am not sitting at the computer to type the quote. You will see here that while he recommends probiotics as a supplement, when it comes to inulin, he suggests food sources. Dr. Bock's book taught me how to be balanced with how I approach supplements, which is why it is a book I refer back to.

 

https://books.google.ca/books?id=zqBWDQAAQBAJ&pg=PT229&lpg=PT229&dq=Healing+the+New+Childhood+Epidemics+inulin&source=bl&ots=H0T4InLJuX&sig=oznLoOw8mC3jtLsQHAoXU8ZK1xk&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiU6MG2urHUAhVP02MKHTBPCKQQ6AEIOzAG#v=onepage&q=inulin&f=false

 

Also, I'm not sure if you are saying about the stims for those that have kids on the spectrum and not specifically about your daughter but if your daughter stims you could look into having her evaluated for autism. I am *not* saying your daughter is on the spectrum but if the possibility is there, from your observations, know that some changes were announced yesterday that may at least get you some funding for services:

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/toronto/autism-program-ontario-1.4151078

 

Just thought I would let you know and you can also pass the info along to people you know that may not have heard about it, yet. I remember you had said you had some acquaintances with kids on the spectrum.

Thanks!  No stims from my daughter just mentioning it for those with kids on the spectrum. 

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I live down the road from this guy. He has some...strange...ideas. Menopause symptoms are a neurological defect and should be treated like a traumatic brain injury. Heart rate variability is the root of all health problems. He doesn't provide any citations to back up his claims, and his ideas are so far out in left field that I've not seen them replicated anywhere.

 

There is a certain amount of improvement in any health issue you will see with an improved diet and a handful of supplements. It's not that I don't believe the results you're experiencing; I'm cautioning you not to take what he says as gospel. You may see a reduced benefit over time as your daughter grows and matures, and I don't want you to lose heart.

Edited by Barb_
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I live down the road from this guy. He has some...strange...ideas. Menopause symptoms are a neurological defect and should be treated like a traumatic brain injury. Heart rate variability is the root of all health problems. He doesn't provide any citations to back up his claims, and his ideas are so far out in left field that I've not seen them replicated anywhere.

 

There is a certain amount of improvement in any health issue you will see with an improved diet and a handful of supplements. It's not that I don't believe the results you're experiencing; I'm cautioning you not to take what he says as gospel. You may see a reduced benefit over time as your daughter grows and matures, and I don't want you to lose heart.

Well you have the jist of what he is saying but I think you misunderstodd some of it.  He says things like Menopause are normal but that symptoms of menopause can be alleviated.  He does not refer to it as Traumatic Brain injury but says perhaps it can be "treated" using the same concepts.  He uses the phrase "cumulative Brain Injury".  He refers to this CBI as resulting from everyday stressors like illness and stress. 

 

He uses HRV to assess people:  https://www.nemechekconsultativemedicine.com/blog/what-is-your-hrv-heart-rate-variability/

 

Here is his view of menopause:  https://www.nemechekconsultativemedicine.com/blog/menopause-is-permanent-pms/

Edited by mermaid'smom

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I also want to assure you all - that I didn't stumble upon this man and proclaim him to be the word of god.  I actually "fixed" my daughter and then found out that I did so by implementing this protocol.  I just had no idea I was doing so.

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Well you have the jist of what he is saying but I think you misunderstodd some of it. He says things like Menopause are normal but that symptoms of menopause can be alleviated. He does not refer to it as Traumatic Brain injury but says perhaps it can be "treated" using the same concepts. He uses the phrase "cumulative Brain Injury". He refers to this CBI as resulting from everyday stressors like illness and stress.

 

He uses HRV to assess people: https://www.nemechekconsultativemedicine.com/blog/what-is-your-hrv-heart-rate-variability/

 

Here is his view of menopause: https://www.nemechekconsultativemedicine.com/blog/menopause-is-permanent-pms/

In this link, he writes:

 

"Some women suffer for decades after menopause. But what if we approach it like a traumatic brain injury or a concussion? What if relief lies in repairing the brains and nervous systems of these women just like repairing the brains and nervous systems of male pro-athletes?"

 

My deeper point was that there is no peer reviewed research that supports his claims. Proceed with caution. That's all.

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In this link, he writes:

 

"Some women suffer for decades after menopause. But what if we approach it like a traumatic brain injury or a concussion? What if relief lies in repairing the brains and nervous systems of these women just like repairing the brains and nervous systems of male pro-athletes?"

 

My deeper point was that there is no peer reviewed research that supports his claims. Proceed with caution. That's all.

I'm aware of what the link says - that is why I posted it.  He says: what if we approach it like a traumatic brain injury.  I mean we are talking semantics here but that is NOT saying menopause is a traumatic brain injury. 

 

He discusses that there is no peer review studies because there is no money to be made from this.

Edited by mermaid'smom

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I am on a FB page with many mom's doing the protocol.  From what I have read so far some are having success, but others have actually seen regression.  I'm glad it worked for the OP and it may work for many, but I would definitely investigate further before starting it since it doesn't seem benign.  

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I am on a FB page with many mom's doing the protocol.  From what I have read so far some are having success, but others have actually seen regression.  I'm glad it worked for the OP and it may work for many, but I would definitely investigate further before starting it since it doesn't seem benign.  

I can't speak about those people on your board but the sheer number of people who REFUSE to stop with the ACC, the digestive enzymes etc while doing it is definitely a factor.  And I don't judge them for NOT.  I think if you have something good going on and you are NOT willing to abandon it all on a lark - good on you.  But to then have them come online and say "It didn't work for us" "It made things worse" etc when in fact they weren't truly following it is erroneous in my opinion. 

 

And that is what seems common to me in those who gave up when the expected (short lived) regressions appeared.

 

But this is a NEW science and protocol and there is so many ?????? right now about it.  Honestly time will be the best barometer of this success.  In months from now it will either fizzle out and die or the success stories will be so compelling even the doubters are willing to consider it.

 

At this point in time - who knows?

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I am on a FB page with many mom's doing the protocol. From what I have read so far some are having success, but others have actually seen regression. I'm glad it worked for the OP and it may work for many, but I would definitely investigate further before starting it since it doesn't seem benign.

Thank you for sharing this! It's good for people to know there have been regressions, regardless.

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This:

 

My deeper point was that there is no peer reviewed research that supports his claims. Proceed with caution. That's all.

Mermaid'smom, I think you may have misunderstood Barb's comment. Usually, when you read articles like this, there are at least some citations to support the line of reasoning. In his case, he just makes assumptions and arrives to conclusions without any kind of support on what led him there. Edited by Guest

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This:

 

Mermaid'smom, I think you may have misunderstood Barb's comment. Usually, when you read articles like this, there are at least some citations to support the line of reasoning. In his case, he just makes assumptions and arrives to conclusions without any kind of support on what led him there.

Which is fine when you are making decisions for yourself. There is nothing wrong with trial and error. But when someone is goving medical advice to other people, the bar must be higher. It's irresponsible to use patients as test subjects.

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Mermaid'smom, one book I have personally found useful is Dr. Kenneth Bock's book *Healing the New Childhood Epidemics*. It is a book I read early on in our journey and is a book I refer back to. Anyway, I'm linking this from Google books. I hope this works as it is a book I have as a printed copy and I am not sitting at the computer to type the quote. You will see here that while he recommends probiotics as a supplement, when it comes to inulin, he suggests food sources. Dr. Bock's book taught me how to be balanced with how I approach supplements, which is why it is a book I refer back to.

 

https://books.google.ca/books?id=zqBWDQAAQBAJ&pg=PT229&lpg=PT229&dq=Healing+the+New+Childhood+Epidemics+inulin&source=bl&ots=H0T4InLJuX&sig=oznLoOw8mC3jtLsQHAoXU8ZK1xk&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiU6MG2urHUAhVP02MKHTBPCKQQ6AEIOzAG#v=onepage&q=inulin&f=false

Apologies, I was referencing the wrong book. Ooops!

 

In any case, the book I linked is by Jennifer Giustra-Kozek and the title is Healing Without Hurting: Treating ADHD, Apraxia, and Autism Spectrum Disorders Naturally. She is a psychotherapist and the mom of an autistic child. Here's the part on inulin:

Probiotics & Prebiotics 101

 

Probiotics are defined as “live microorganisms, which, when administered in the adequate amounts, support gut health.†The microorganisms found in probiotics are known as “friendly bacteria†or “good bacteria†and are, for the most part, microorganisms naturally found in the human body. The most commonly used probiotics come from two groups known as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium.

 

Buy a high-quality, extra-strength probiotic supplement that needs to be refrigerated and is free of gluten, dairy, and other allergens. Also, get one that provides a high amount of live units per capsule. Do not take with warm liquids, give it to your child daily for best results, and store it in the freezer for extended life.

 

Feed probiotics with prebiotics. Prebiotics are defined as non-digestible dietary fiber that triggers the growth of healthy gut bacteria. The most common type of prebiotic is the soluble fiber inulin. It is important to get plenty of inulin from plants containing fructan. Some of these sources include asparagus, chicory, garlic, leek, onion, and artichoke.

 

“Adequate intake of dietary fiber is increasingly being recommended by governmental public health agencies as a means to maintain and increase health and well-being. Some epidemiological studies have shown support for an inverse relationship between dietary fiber consumption and risk of some chronic diseases. Developing evidence suggests that dietary fiber protects against cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and many digestive disorders; inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.†2

That said, there are concerns by some health experts that prebiotics may also feed the bad bacteria in our gut. So, with individuals with an unbalanced digestive tract, such with those with chronic digestive symptoms like diarrhea, flatulence, stomach pains, reflux, and leaky gut syndrome, food allergies, or food intolerance, doctors may suggest “starving out†good and bad bacteria initially by removing certain fiber from the diet. Although this sounds like a contradiction, if fiber is not limited symptoms may become worse. If there is an overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria, yeast, and/ or fungi, the good microbes cannot do their job of properly digesting fiber, which causes the very symptoms we are trying to eradicate. Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD, provides all the necessary details for the GAPS protocol in her book Gut and Psychology Syndrome.

 

Giustra-Kozek, Jennifer. Healing Without Hurting: Treating ADHD, Apraxia, and Autism Spectrum Disorders Naturally (Kindle Locations 2246-2253). Changing Lives Press. Kindle Edition.

Here's the second reference on inulin (also adding in the mention on probiotics):

Prebiotic— Nondigestible dietary fiber that triggers the growth of healthy gut bacteria. The most common type of prebiotic is the soluble fiber inulin. Best sources include asparagus, chicory, garlic, leek, onion, and artichoke.

 

Probiotic— A preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing live bacteria (such as lactobacilli) that benefit humans and animals— e.g., by restoring the balance of microflora in the digestive tract.

 

Giustra-Kozek, Jennifer. Healing Without Hurting: Treating ADHD, Apraxia, and Autism Spectrum Disorders Naturally (Kindle Locations 5574-5575). Changing Lives Press. Kindle Edition.

Parts in bold are for emphasis. Note, she is saying to consume inulin through healthy food sources and with probiotics.

Edited by Guest

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Note, there are studies to back this claim. This article is from The Journal of Nutrition:

 

 

 

Developing evidence suggests that dietary fiber protects against cardiovascular disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and many digestive disorders; inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.                                                                   Giustra-Kozek, Jennifer. Healing Without Hurting: Treating ADHD, Apraxia, and Autism Spectrum Disorders Naturally Changing Lives Press. Kindle Edition.  

 

 

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/129/7/1412S.full

 

And note all the literature cited at the end of the link that I have provided. From the link (note, part in bold is for emphasis):

 

 

Inulin and oligofructose are dietary fibers by definition and by their nutritional properties. These substrates have not always been classified as ‘dietary fiber’, and classical analytical methods for dietary fiber analysis do not measure them. However, we conclude that the most appropriate classification and labelling for inulin and oligofructose is that of ‘dietary fiber.’

Accordingly, we find there is no scientific evidence in the available data and literature on the food uses of these substances that demonstrates or suggests reasonable grounds to suspect a hazard to the public when used at levels that are current or that might reasonably be expected to be used in the future.

Our position regarding the safety of inulin and oligofructose is based on the long human experience of consuming inulin containing foods as well as evaluation of available scientific evidence relating to inulin and its hydrolysis products. Since inulin and oligofructose have been natural components of many foods consumed safely by humans over millennia, there is no reason to suspect a significant risk to the public health when used in foods.

Therefore, we conclude that these food substances are generally recognized as safe, both by long-established history of use in foods and by the opinion of experts qualified by scientific training and experience in food safety after a thorough review of the available scientific evidence.

 

 

 

Health claims

In Europe, Japan and several other countries, the nutritional properties of inulin and oligofructose are used to formulate health claims on food products and food supplements. An overview of these is given by Coussement (1997). In most countries including the United States and the European countries, such claims should not suggest the cure or prevention of disease, should not be misleading and should be based on sound science.

 

Edited by Guest

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From the University of Maryland Medical Center on Omega-3:

 

"Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

 

Children with ADHD may have low levels of certain essential fatty acids (including EPA and DHA). In a clinical study of nearly 100 boys, those with lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids had more learning and behavioral problems (such as temper tantrums and sleep disturbances) than boys with normal omega-3 fatty acid levels.

 

However, studies examining whether omega-3 fatty acids help improve symptoms of ADHD have produced mixed results. A few studies show that omega-3 fatty acids help improve behavioral symptoms. But most of these studies were not well designed. One study that looked at DHA in addition to stimulant therapy (standard therapy for ADHD) found no effect. More research is needed. In the meantime, eating foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids is a reasonable approach for someone with ADHD."

 

Also note that Nemecheck is recommending high doses of Omega-3 for *teens* (3,000 to 4,000 mg/ day):

https://thenemechekprotocol.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/faq-omega-3/

 

Now look what the University of Maryland has to say under precautions:

"Precautions

 

Because of the potential for side effects and interactions with medications, you should only take dietary supplements only under the supervision of a knowledgeable health care provider.

 

Omega-3 fatty acids should be used cautiously by people who bruise easily, have a bleeding disorder, or take blood-thinning medications, including warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), or aspirin. High doses of omega-3 fatty acids may increase the risk of bleeding, even in people without a history of bleeding disorders, and even in those who are not taking other medications.

 

Fish oil can cause gas, bloating, belching, and diarrhea. Time release preparations may reduce these side effects, however.

 

People with either diabetes or schizophrenia may lack the ability to convert alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the forms more readily absorbed by the body. People with these conditions should be sure to get enough EPA and DHA from their diets. Also, people with type 2 diabetes may experience increases in fasting blood sugar levels while taking fish oil supplements. If you have type 2 diabetes, use fish oil supplements only under the supervision of a health care provider.

 

Although studies suggest that eating fish (which includes the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA) may reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a more recent study including 2 large groups of men and women found that diets rich in ALA may increase the risk of this disease. Until more information becomes available, people with macular degeneration should get omega-3 fatty acids from sources of EPA and DHA, rather than ALA.

 

Fish and fish oil may protect against prostate cancer, but some suggest that ALA may be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer in men. More research in this area is needed.

 

Some fish may contain potentially harmful contaminants, such as heavy metals (including mercury), dioxins, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). For sport caught fish, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that pregnant or nursing women eat no more than a single 6-ounce meal per week, and young children less than 2 ounces per week. For farm raised, imported, or marine fish, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that pregnant or nursing women and young children avoid eating types with higher levels of mercury (such as mackerel, shark, swordfish, or tilefish), and eat up to 12 ounces per week of other fish types.

 

Buy fish oil from a reputable source that tests for mercury and pesticide residues in its products."

 

Here's the link from the University of Maryland where the quotes came from:

http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids

 

Safety and dosing from the Mayo Clinic:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/omega-3-fatty-acids-fish-oil-alpha-linolenic-acid/safety/hrb-20059372

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Op, thank you for sharing your experiences. It is always wonderful to hear a child is doing well.

 

However, I'm sure I'm not the only one who read your first update a while back stating you had cured your daughter and got truly excited and amazed for you. I recall wondering at the time who else could be helped by your story and considered passing it on to real life friends.

 

Fast forward and we now hear that the first success relapsed and now you've found another. So I think you must understand people's caution and skepticism, especially when it comes with no studies or evidence to back up this man's claims.

 

With that said, I hope with all of my heart that your daughter remains on a path of good health and happiness.

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I hadn't noticed this from his protocol on Omega-3 found further down. Yikes!

 

"I escalate the dose of omega-3 fatty acids from 600 mg per day for the younger, smaller children up to a total of 3,000 mg (total of EPA and DHA) depending on weight with the top end of 4,500 mg per day for an adult.

 

If there is no significant improvement within 2 months, I generally increase (double) the dosage of omega-3 fatty acids. If things still do not improve or seem to plateau after a couple months, I now add bioelectric Vagus Nerve stimulation to the Nemechek Protocol with good results. (See my screencast about vagus nerve stimulation.)"

 

Found here:

https://thenemechekprotocol.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/faq-omega-3/

 

Here's what Vagus Nerve Stimulation is:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/vagus-nerve-stimulation/home/ovc-20167755

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Though we also need to consider Inulin, in regard to 'climate change'?

While Inulin isn't 'digested' in the intestine.

It does go through a process of 'fermentation', and by the time that it reaches the lower intestine?

It is producing the gases of Carbon Dioxide and Methane.

Both of which contribute to 'Global Warming'.

 

So that we shouldn't have more daily Inulin, than we really need.

 

 

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However, I'm sure I'm not the only one who read your first update a while back stating you had cured your daughter and got truly excited and amazed for you. I recall wondering at the time who else could be helped by your story and considered passing it on to real life friends.

 

The last time it was the gluten free diet, followed by celiacs and often recommended by doctors for ASD kids. It's food based and it just means that flours with gluten are replaced by gluten-free. This is different!

 

Mermaid'smom, you mentioned several times about the $30 cost but it is not about the cost. I have paid tons on books and other resources on autism, ADHD, EF, SPD. The concern is not the monetary cost but rather the potential cost on the child's health. While he does say that everything is natural and safe, there are still causes for concern. This was why I posted all the previous info for you.

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But this is a NEW science and protocol and there is so many ?????? right now about it.  

 

Just because this particular doc doesn't know anyone already doing this doesn't mean it's new science. My nutritionist has worked 30+ years reversing health problems, especially gut problems, using fruit, etc., and the foods she uses are on that list as being high in inulin.

 

I think it's patently absurd to say it can't be done with food. I can't even find charts with people disclosing how much inulin is in garlic, oatmeal, bananas, etc., to back up the claims of the supplement manufacturers that people couldn't POSSIBLY get enough to be therapeutic with only food. The dose Dr. N is suggesting is so incredibly small (2-4 gummies) that it doesn't seem reasonable that you couldn't get to a therapeutic level of that with an intentional diet. Most people just don't eat that well. The op is taking a higher dose, but again I can't find charts to disclose what that would take with food.

 

Look, I've been around this so long, watching docs make claims, watching docs get on the nutrition or supplement bandwagon. They really have their own, medicalized way of how they approach it. The op has found something that is working for them right now, fab. Think about the absurdity of where this is going. If eating 2-4 gummies would reverse the severe apraxia of autism (which is going to be the case in 50% of the kids, that it's due to praxis of speech), then every PROMPT practitioner out there would be dispensing them like candy, mercy. 

 

I'm glad it helps somebody. With so many genetic and environmental paths, it's really hard to make pat statements. 

 

 

I can't speak about those people on your board but the sheer number of people who REFUSE to stop with the ACC, the digestive enzymes etc while doing it is definitely a factor.  And I don't judge them for NOT.  I think if you have something good going on and you are NOT willing to abandon it all on a lark - good on you.  But to then have them come online and say "It didn't work for us" "It made things worse" etc when in fact they weren't truly following it is erroneous in my opinion. ...

 

I hope you know I mean this gently, but, um, that's some mighty strong koolaid you're drinking. Hard problems don't have simple answers, and when docs latch onto ONE THING and go see, if you follow my MAGIC PROTOCOL all your problems will GO AWAY, usually it means they haven't wrapped their brains around how complex it is yet.

 

There are so many pathways into autism now that it is ABSURD and illogical to say one thing cures EVERYTHING. It doesn't even stand to reason. And, not to point this out, but you concluded your dd doesn't have autism. Sounds like you concluded she has severe celiac and gut dysbiosis. I'm really unclear what you concluded. But I know my ds has autism, and I know it's complex. And I know some guy saying 2-4 fiber gummies a day would solve everything is cracked in the head.

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Though we also need to consider Inulin, in regard to 'climate change'?

While Inulin isn't 'digested' in the intestine.

It does go through a process of 'fermentation', and by the time that it reaches the lower intestine?

It is producing the gases of Carbon Dioxide and Methane.

Both of which contribute to 'Global Warming'.

 

So that we shouldn't have more daily Inulin, than we really need.

 

Just that makes me wanna go eat some more fiber. Maybe we can warm up Ohio enough that we can actually swim in the summer. :D

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The last time it was the gluten free diet, followed by celiacs and often recommended by doctors for ASD kids. It's food based and it just means that flours with gluten are replaced by gluten-free. This is different!

 

Mermaid'smom, you mentioned several times about the $30 cost but it is not about the cost. I have paid tons on books and other resources on autism, ADHD, EF, SPD. The concern is not the monetary cost but rather the potential cost on the child's health. While he does say that everything is natural and safe, there are still causes for concern. This was why I posted all the previous info for you.

Yes, I'm very familiar with celiac and gf, as it is in my family. I realize it's very different than what she's speaking about now. That wasn't my point. My point is that she relapsed before so people, regardless of the controversy of the "cure", are more likely to be cautious.

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Yes, I'm very familiar with celiac and gf, as it is in my family. I realize it's very different than what she's speaking about now. That wasn't my point. My point is that she relapsed before so people, regardless of the controversy of the "cure", are more likely to be cautious.

I know and I saw your point on that! I was just adding that at least the last time it wasn't controversial ;)

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I hadn't noticed this from his protocol on Omega-3 found further down. Yikes!

 

"I escalate the dose of omega-3 fatty acids from 600 mg per day for the younger, smaller children up to a total of 3,000 mg (total of EPA and DHA) depending on weight with the top end of 4,500 mg per day for an adult.

 

If there is no significant improvement within 2 months, I generally increase (double) the dosage of omega-3 fatty acids. If things still do not improve or seem to plateau after a couple months, I now add bioelectric Vagus Nerve stimulation to the Nemechek Protocol with good results. (See my screencast about vagus nerve stimulation.)"

 

Found here:

https://thenemechekprotocol.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/faq-omega-3/

 

Here's what Vagus Nerve Stimulation is:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/vagus-nerve-stimulation/home/ovc-20167755

Actually, he does not stop there! If you look at one of my previous posts (quoted above) he is saying to increase to 3,000mg for the younger kids. If nothing happens in two months then he would double, so 6,000mg Omega-3 at this point. If there's still no change, he switches to Vagus Nerve Stimulation, hence why I am saying, there are red flags that would concern me.

 

If eating 2-4 gummies would reverse the severe apraxia of autism (which is going to be the case in 50% of the kids, that it's due to praxis of speech), then every PROMPT practitioner out there would be dispensing them like candy, mercy.

 

Edited by Guest

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Just because this particular doc doesn't know anyone already doing this doesn't mean it's new science. My nutritionist has worked 30+ years reversing health problems, especially gut problems, using fruit, etc., and the foods she uses are on that list as being high in inulin.

 

I think it's patently absurd to say it can't be done with food. I can't even find charts with people disclosing how much inulin is in garlic, oatmeal, bananas, etc., to back up the claims of the supplement manufacturers that people couldn't POSSIBLY get enough to be therapeutic with only food. The dose Dr. N is suggesting is so incredibly small (2-4 gummies) that it doesn't seem reasonable that you couldn't get to a therapeutic level of that with an intentional diet. Most people just don't eat that well. The op is taking a higher dose, but again I can't find charts to disclose what that would take with food.

 

Look, I've been around this so long, watching docs make claims, watching docs get on the nutrition or supplement bandwagon. They really have their own, medicalized way of how they approach it. The op has found something that is working for them right now, fab. Think about the absurdity of where this is going. If eating 2-4 gummies would reverse the severe apraxia of autism (which is going to be the case in 50% of the kids, that it's due to praxis of speech), then every PROMPT practitioner out there would be dispensing them like candy, mercy. 

 

I'm glad it helps somebody. With so many genetic and environmental paths, it's really hard to make pat statements. 

 

 

 

I hope you know I mean this gently, but, um, that's some mighty strong koolaid you're drinking. Hard problems don't have simple answers, and when docs latch onto ONE THING and go see, if you follow my MAGIC PROTOCOL all your problems will GO AWAY, usually it means they haven't wrapped their brains around how complex it is yet.

 

There are so many pathways into autism now that it is ABSURD and illogical to say one thing cures EVERYTHING. It doesn't even stand to reason. And, not to point this out, but you concluded your dd doesn't have autism. Sounds like you concluded she has severe celiac and gut dysbiosis. I'm really unclear what you concluded. But I know my ds has autism, and I know it's complex. And I know some guy saying 2-4 fiber gummies a day would solve everything is cracked in the head.

 

 

Quoting here, though your earlier post in this thread got my wheels spinning.

 

I've heard chatter in some circles that Paleo diet "cures" autism, and I've always chalked this up to the kid probably actually having a B12 deficiency, maybe he can't absorb B12 well and eats a lot of processed food or whatever. Switch to Paleo where Mom is hiding ground up liver to the weekly hamburgers and meatloaf, and boom, yeah the "autism" gets cured.

 

But this whole thread brought to mind the diet de jour of a few years ago - Resistant Starch. What it is. Some more info about it. One interesting thing I got through trawling Paleo/WAPF sites is the insistence on getting nutrients from food. Which is why they go through the insane trouble of soaking things and getting special butter and so on. They're hunting down specific micro-nutrients in their food. So, in the second link, there is a lot of talk about getting RS from food (particular and particularly prepared food) with some allowance made for adding on more RS from a good natural source.

 

Of course, people are apt to take things way too far. So during this time I heard of people going on Potato Diets. Where they literally ate nothing but cooked and cooled potatoes for a week. Ooookkaaayyy.....

 

But this whole question - how is what we eat digested? How does it chemically change? Is something that I don't think the experts are entirely sure about. So prebiotics - intentionally feeding (or starving) gut flora is something that has question marks on it.

 

What I do know, from my brief foray into Paleo, is that hitting even the USDA food pyramid suggestions for servings of fruits and vegetables is not achieved by most people. Going beyond it takes work. Cutting out grains and other "easy" starches made me reorient my whole idea of a well-balanced meal. When I wanted a snack I didn't grab pretzels or "healthy" crackers, I cut up a cucumber and a tomato. Fortunately, I lived in Florida and had access to a Hispanic market that had 15/$1 limes and I could walk out with a cart overflowing with produce for under $40 (including avocados). It was really a shocking amount of vegetables I went through in a week. And I thought I was already eating pretty healthy!

 

So, lots of Paleo types limit fruit because so many adults are coming to it as sugar-addicted hyperglycemics. They'll likely snack on just overripe bananas if they get a chance. Or, they're Paleo to be LC because of mental health (being in ketosis is apparently a treatment for bipolar or schizophrenia, or something). But, there's a general consensus that kids should have unlimited access to all the whole foods of whatever type they want. Feed the raging growth hormones! So kids in Paleo houses are also eating a ton of fruit, I would guess.

 

All this to say, yes it's probably all very complicated, but this prebiotic idea is possibly a part of the picture. And it makes me wonder if some of the "autism" being cured with Paleo wasn't B12 but maybe crazy-bad gut bacteria issues. Who knows. I also wonder about the fact that DH has had long-standing digestive issues that made me wonder if he had IBS, and Crazypants went through issues with constipation (which I think I solved with probiotic kefir I got from Whole Foods). So, again, hmmmm..... 

 

But, if anyone is interested in feeding their kids the prebiotic fiber of Resistant Starch instead of inulin using actual food....those links give some ideas. Now is the season for potato salad.

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To be clear...I came here and said I cured my daughter by going GF/DF but in reality it was the same protocol then that has recovered her this time also.  I mistakenly attributed it to going GF DF until we lost the success and I was able to tease out what really brought about the change.

 

I wish you all the best of luck!

 

 

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Menopause symptoms are a neurological defect and should be treated like a traumatic brain injury.  

 

Menopause feels like a traumatic brain injury some days.

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My main concern, personally, is for Mermaid'smom and her daughter. Her focus in treating her daughter has been about dealing with health issues that the rest of us are not dealing with with our kids. My heart goes out to her because I know she came with good intentions to help others. I just have this nagging concern though!

 

Mermaid'smom, my heart goes out to you! Keeping you in my prayers.

I appreciate your concern but this is the healthiest she has been in years.

 

I was tempted to come on here and explain away some of your concerns but I can see that many have their minds made up.  And I have no dog in this fight so I am completely fine with that.  As my post titles states I have that craziest update that may help SOME of you.

 

For those of you still curious about the protocol - there is a very educated lady that used to be a research assistant at UCLA Dept of Medicine who posted some great articles about Inulin.  Said she was outraged when she first heard about this so she did what she does and spent countless hours combing over 100 research papers to decide what is what about Inulin. And was rather convinced that this was all horse shit. 

 

Well, 100 papers later she concluded that she was wrong about Inulin and now is in line with DR. Nemechek's POV.  Her quote:  "I was almost outraged when I first read this article. I couldn't believe that anyone would buy into it. Now I just feel stupid for not realizing this earlier. I minored in nutrition in college and it's a huge personal interest of mine and I was SO wrong. Oh well you live and learn."

 

She posted the links to some of the easier to read papers and has promised to answer any questions.  Feel free to ask her anything if you are interested.

 

She further replied when I asked about a direct link to something:  " there's no direct study unfortunately 1f641.png :( that's why I've had to read so long. It's basically reading 5 studies to draw conclusions (which is why I assume nemechek isn't posting studies to back up his findings)."

Edited by mermaid'smom

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Actually, he does not stop there! If you look at one of my previous posts (quoted above) he is saying to increase to 3,000mg for the younger kids. If nothing happens in two months then he would double, so 6,000mg Omega-3 at this point. If there's still no change, he switches to Vagus Nerve Stimulation, hence why I am saying, there are red flags that would concern me.

 

 

 

This is absolutely incorrect (in more than one way in fact!).   You absolutely misunderstand the dosing.

 

He says (direct quote!):  You can escalate the dose of omega-3 fatty acids from 600 mg per day for the younger, smaller children up to a total of 3,000 mg (total of EPA and DHA) depending on weight with the top end of 4,500 mg per day for an adult. 

Edited by mermaid'smom

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Menopause feels like a traumatic brain injury some days.

:lol: :lol: I'll concede the point

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I appreciate your concern but this is the healthiest she has been in years.

 

...

 

 

That's wonderful!  And I would think it is even good to know that she can come out of her bad state... that it does not seem to be permanent and fixed.  Even if there are regressions, to know that there are good times and for that to give hope of reversal and improvement.

 

I don't have an ASD child, but am interested in what you posted about for other reasons, mainly my own issues, like chronic fatigue and headaches.

 

I would not be much concerned about adding some inulin to my diet (slowly so as to stop if I notice any global warming effects). And I already use fish oil and olive oil. My greater concern would be stopping all other supplements where I experience them to help, though not solve the problems that I have.

 

So I am not prepared to be a protocol purist and stop everything else, at least not at this moment.  but I am very interested in knowing your dd's longer term experience if you do it in a purist way.

 

I'm sort of on and off these forums as my ds is currently in public school, not homeschool, but would like to hear a follow-up on this!  Maybe in a few months and then in a year or so you could post on how your dd is doing and whether you are still following the protocol, and also PM me so I will get it even if not paying attention to this website at those times.

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That's wonderful!  And I would think it is even good to know that she can come out of her bad state... that it does not seem to be permanent and fixed.  Even if there are regressions, to know that there are good times and for that to give hope of reversal and improvement.

 

I don't have an ASD child, but am interested in what you posted about for other reasons, mainly my own issues, like chronic fatigue and headaches.

 

I would not be much concerned about adding some inulin to my diet (slowly so as to stop if I notice any global warming effects). And I already use fish oil and olive oil. My greater concern would be stopping all other supplements where I experience them to help, though not solve the problems that I have.

 

So I am not prepared to be a protocol purist and stop everything else, at least not at this moment.  but I am very interested in knowing your dd's longer term experience if you do it in a purist way.

 

I'm sort of on and off these forums as my ds is currently in public school, not homeschool, but would like to hear a follow-up on this!  Maybe in a few months and then in a year or so you could post on how your dd is doing and whether you are still following the protocol, and also PM me so I will get it even if not paying attention to this website at those times.

I appreciate that you will do your due dillegence for the planet and stop the protocol if the ozone suffers - regardless of your health  ;)

 

I am not a "purist" either in the sense that I give my daughter melatonin and Magnesium citrate if/when constipation occurs but we did in fact drop all B12 etc and are just seeing gains.

 

There are a mix of us on the FB group.  Some are doing it with ACC and other things and some are "pure" lol!  Would love to give you updates!!

 

Thanks :)

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I hadn't noticed this from his protocol on Omega-3 found further down. Yikes!

 

"I escalate the dose of omega-3 fatty acids from 600 mg per day for the younger, smaller children up to a total of 3,000 mg (total of EPA and DHA) depending on weight with the top end of 4,500 mg per day for an adult.

 

If there is no significant improvement within 2 months, I generally increase (double) the dosage of omega-3 fatty acids. If things still do not improve or seem to plateau after a couple months, I now add bioelectric Vagus Nerve stimulation to the Nemechek Protocol with good results. (See my screencast about vagus nerve stimulation.)"

 

Found here:

https://thenemechekprotocol.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/faq-omega-3/

 

Here's what Vagus Nerve Stimulation is:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/vagus-nerve-stimulation/home/ovc-20167755

Mermaid'smom, here's the exact quote and link that I posted up thread. There is *absolutely no indication* what the dose/ weight is but he does say up to 3,000 for the younger children. Now read on, he says in 2 months if there are no results he doubles, so taking the max we have now reached 6,000. Then, he says, after another couple of months, if there are no results he switches to Vagus Nerve Stimulation. Ummmm, VNS is used for epilepsy as you can see by the link I have provided. Really????? How does he justify that?

 

You know, most of us have come on here because we have seen or read a lot. We know the fads, we have heard or know of horror stories. We took the time to post out of concern but you are coming across as aggressive and using language that I personally have not seen on this forum or board and even if it is used I do not engage in it. This is my last post in this thread. I still wish for the best, for your girl's sake!

Edited by Guest

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This is all interesting and if I were either:

A. Completely out of options, nothing was working, etc.

or

B. Just starting and hadn't found anything useful yet that I wanted to keep trying, so open to a new idea

 

I'd probably try it, with a kid with similar difficulties.

 

That said, what really irks me about it, and about many natural remedies proponents, is the near-universal argument that the only reason this 100% cure to a major malady (in this case, autism) hasn't been peer-reviewed and trialed and promoted by every doctor is that there's no money to be made from it.  First of all, there's always money to be made.  Fish oil and inulin could (and already do) make a ton of money. No one's really medicating autistic kids in a universal and cure-all sort of way anyway, so it's not like there's any big drug you're trying to displace. Secondly, while I am thoroughly convinced that some doctors and psychologists are corrupt, I am just as thoroughly convinced that the majority of them are not. 

 

If this protocol cures autism for even 20% of autistic kids, I 100% guarantee it will be almost universally known and the developer will be a super famous gabillionaire within a year.

 

That is not to say that it doesn't either alleviate a lot of symptoms for a significant portion of kids or alleviate all symptoms for a small minority of kids, though.

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Canadian Mom, the way I read that link is that he is saying the dose is up to 3000 mg for older/heavier kids (that is, he increases the dose by weight).

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Canadian Mom, the way I read that link is that he is saying the dose is up to 3000 mg for older/heavier kids (that is, he increases the dose by weight).

This is what he says about teens (same link):

"And when dosing I tend to increase the dose of omega-3 is the children are older (600 mg per day for 3-5 year olds, up to 3000-4000 mg per day in teenagers). When in doubt, I favor a high dose."

 

In the other quote he says to a max of 3,000 where as here for teens he says up to 4,000 and that he favors a high dose. This is all before the doubling part and the VNS. I have already posted and linked some warnings.

 

Me, I follow conservative sources and even then I only follow certain things that I have researched to death. It's why I said, the op's situation is different. If it were one of my kids with that symptomatology, I would be hounding doctors for medical testing to find what is wrong, not following experimental treatments. But the op is correct, to each his own!

Edited by Guest

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Omega3 is also a 'blood thinner' and inhibits blood clotting.

In the 'protocol' he also states: "A recommended starting dose for small kids is about 600 mg of omega-3 (the total of EPA plus DHA) per day."

At this dosage, a young child could lose the ability to form 'blood clots'?

So that something as simple as a 'blood nose'.  Could require a blood transfusion, that totally replaces their blood?

Any 'sudden surgery', would also have serious consequences!

 

This doctor and his 'protocol', need to be separated from a discussion of Inulin.

As his 'protocol' has no validity at all.  

 

Where it clouds a genuine discussion of Inulin.

Which could lead onto a broader discussion of the relationship between the 'gut and the brain and the nervous system'.

 

In regard to Inulin, it should be noted that it only supports certain types of 'beneficial bacteria'.

Where other types of 'beneficial bacteria;, are supported by the fibre from Oats.

 

So that perhaps we could put this 'Protocol' aside, and have a broader discussion of the benefits of establishing and maintaining a 'healthy biota in our gut'?

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I can understand the OP's amazement.  She was treating her daughter's gut health.   A prebiotic and Omega-3 is a thoroughly reasonable approach.   I don't think any doctor would have a problem with that.  They might try to add their own tweaks, but generally be OK with it.  

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....

So that perhaps we could put this 'Protocol' aside, and have a broader discussion of the benefits of establishing and maintaining a 'healthy biota in our gut'?

 

 

Or, a How to Get and Maintain ...

 

That seems to be the question.  Healthy gut biota being a good thing seems as self-apparent as a healthy body being a good thing. 

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Canadian Mom, the way I read that link is that he is saying the dose is up to 3000 mg for older/heavier kids (that is, he increases the dose by weight).

 

 I just lost a long post so let me try this again. 

 

Ananemone, now that I am sitting at a computer instead of typing with one finger on a tablet, I'll try to explain a bit more what I am talking about. 

 

 

From Nemechek's website, same link as before, Just concentrating all the references to dosage in one place:

 

 

 

And when dosing I tend to increase the dose of omega-3 is the children are older (600 mg per day for 3-5 year olds, up to 3000-4000 mg per day in teenagers).  When in doubt, I favor a high dose.
I escalate the dose of omega-3 fatty acids from 600 mg per day for the younger, smaller children up to a total of 3,000 mg (total of EPA and DHA) depending on weight with the top end of 4,500 mg per day for an adult.
If there is no significant improvement within 2 months, I generally increase (double)  the dosage of omega-3 fatty acids. If things still do not improve or seem to plateau after a couple months, I now add bioelectric Vagus Nerve stimulation to thNemechek Protocol with good results.  (See my screencast about vagus nerve stimulation.)

  

This is from NIH (National Institutes of Health):

 

Safety of Omega-3s

For most macronutrients, the IOM has established an AMDR that suggests an “acceptable†range of intake. The AMDR for total fat intake, for example, is based on adverse effects from either very low-fat or high-fat diets. The IOM established an AMDR for omega-3s (as ALA) of 0.6 to 1.2% of energy for children and adults aged 1 year and older [5]. The IOM also noted that about 10% of the AMDR can be consumed as EPA and/or DHA.

The IOM did not establish a UL for any omega-3s, although it noted that high doses of DHA and/or EPA (900 mg/day of EPA plus 600 mg/day DHA or more for several weeks) might reduce immune function due to suppression of inflammatory responses. Doses of 2–15 g/day EPA and/or DHA might also increase bleeding time by reducing platelet aggregation [5]. However, according to the European Food Safety Authority, long-term consumption of EPA and DHA supplements at combined doses of up to about 5 g/day appears to be safe [167]. It noted that these doses have not been shown to cause bleeding problems or affect immune function, glucose homeostasis, or lipid peroxidation. The FDA recommends not exceeding 3 g/day EPA and DHA combined, with up to 2 g/day from dietary supplements [168]. Some doses used in clinical trials exceed these levels.

Commonly reported side effects of omega-3 supplements are usually mild. These include unpleasant taste, bad breath, heartburn, nausea, gastrointestinal discomfort, diarrhea, headache, and odoriferous sweat [142,162].

 

Found here:

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-HealthProfessional/

Based on FDA recommendations, daily EPA and DHA should not exceed 2g/day from dietary supplements. 2g meaning therefore 2,000 mg EPA and DHA. In Nemechek's protocol, let's assume a "heavy" 12 yr old taking the maximum preteen dose of 3,000 mg of EPA and DHA per day. This child is now exceeding the recommended FDA daily dose of EPA and DHA by 1,000 mg. If in 2 months this child does not show improvement and based on his approach of doubling the dosage, this child will now be taking 6,000 mg of EPA and DHA, therefore 4,000 mg above the FDA recommended. Now let's assume a teen at the maximum 4,000 mg dose. He is exceeding by 2,000 mg and if doubled at 2 months (therefore 8,000 mg EPA and DHA) he is now exceeding the FDA's recommended max by 6,000 mg.

 

What am I misunderstanding here? Is it not clear that he uses these dosages and then doubles them? 

 

My quotes from Jennifer Giustra-Kozek were to show that people have most certainly used inulin from food sources and have had results but most sources that I saw recommend using, not eliminating, probiotics. Previous quote from Giustra-Kozek's book:

 

 

 

That said, there are concerns by some health experts that prebiotics may also feed the bad bacteria in our gut.

This is consistent with some research I did. 

 

Another quote I posted up thread from the University of Maryland:

 

 

 

"Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

 

Children with ADHD may have low levels of certain essential fatty acids (including EPA and DHA). In a clinical study of nearly 100 boys, those with lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids had more learning and behavioral problems (such as temper tantrums and sleep disturbances) than boys with normal omega-3 fatty acid levels.

 

However, studies examining whether omega-3 fatty acids help improve symptoms of ADHD have produced mixed results. A few studies show that omega-3 fatty acids help improve behavioral symptoms. But most of these studies were not well designed. One study that looked at DHA in addition to stimulant therapy (standard therapy for ADHD) found no effect. More research is needed. In the meantime, eating foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids is a reasonable approach for someone with ADHD."

 

Found here.

 

Adding a quote from Dr. Kenneth Bock's book Healing the New Childhood Epidemics:

 

 

In the ARI parent rating scale, EFAs scored as follows:

  • Symptoms improved: 54 percent
  • No discernible effect: 43 percent
  • Symptoms worsened: 2 percent

 

Note, his (meaning Dr. Bock's) protocol does not have any recommendations for exceeding the FDA limits and none of the approximately 20 supplements I randomly chose to look at to see what is available exceed it if you take the dosage recommended on the bottle. So, he (Nemechek) is recommending exceeding what is recommended on the bottle and recommending doubling dosages if you do not see results when studies have shown that fish oil does not help every case.

 

The immune/ gut/ brain connection has been studied and is being studied by many experts in the medical field. I read and have read, watched documentaries, etc. and nothing is cut and dried. There are so many variables based on disorder, genes, even going down to individual case when you have complexities and various different disorders influencing what the person is experiencing. So, for this man to be stating that his single protocol is going to have the same outcome for all these different disorders goes beyond simplistic. It is outrageous. 

 

In regards to the op, the word aggressive was probably an unsuitable choice of word, but she has been defensive from the start with whomever has not agreed, or has had a different opinion, or has just simply tried to caution her out of concern. The "to each his own" was used on numerous occasions when most were just trying to voice an opinion or address a concern. As for me, certain language was used twice while quoting my posts and that I found offensive. 

 

I had to explain my position and now I am walking away. 

Edited by Guest

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So that perhaps we could put this 'Protocol' aside, and have a broader discussion of the benefits of establishing and maintaining a 'healthy biota in our gut'?

 

If you start a new thread, I'll try to find the time to participate  ;)

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I agree with your concern Canadian Mom, I was just addressing the point of difference between you and the OP; you stated at one point that you were concerned about dosing young children at 3,000mg; as far as I understand, young children (3-5 yrs old) are at 600mg (eventually doubled, so 1200mg), and only a medium-sized child (as he does the initial dose by weight/age), I assume maybe an 8-9 year old, would be at 1500 initially and 3000 eventually.

 

It's the casual use of the vagus nerve stimulation that makes me go  :scared:

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I agree with your concern Canadian Mom, I was just addressing the point of difference between you and the OP; you stated at one point that you were concerned about dosing young children at 3,000mg; as far as I understand, young children (3-5 yrs old) are at 600mg (eventually doubled, so 1200mg), and only a medium-sized child (as he does the initial dose by weight/age), I assume maybe an 8-9 year old, would be at 1500 initially and 3000 eventually.

 

It's the casual use of the vagus nerve stimulation that makes me go :scared:

I should have said the preteen range instead of young children ;) I was trying to distinguish the preteen range (600mg-3,000mg) from the teen range of 3,000mg-4,000mg. His wording is also open to interpretation in many places, I found. Like he is purposely trying to be vague ;)

 

Yes, that VNS sounds creepy!

Edited by Guest

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Found here:

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-HealthProfessional/

Based on FDA recommendations, daily EPA and DHA should not exceed 2g/day from dietary supplements. 2g meaning therefore 2,000 mg EPA and DHA. In Nemechek's protocol, let's assume a "heavy" 12 yr old taking the maximum preteen dose of 3,000 mg of EPA and DHA per day. This child is now exceeding the recommended FDA daily dose of EPA and DHA by 1,000 mg. If in 2 months this child does not show improvement and based on his approach of doubling the dosage, this child will now be taking 6,000 mg of EPA and DHA, therefore 4,000 mg above the FDA recommended. Now let's assume a teen at the maximum 4,000 mg dose. He is exceeding by 2,000 mg and if doubled at 2 months (therefore 8,000 mg EPA and DHA) he is now exceeding the FDA's recommended max by 6,000 mg.

 

 

 

Another quote I posted up thread from the University of Maryland:

 

 

Found here.

 

 

 

I'm going to have to read up more on this. I've been giving my daughter 1,600mg of Omega 3's, with a high EPA to DHA ratio, which I'd seen recommended in at least a couple of places. This requires taking two supplements, one that is almost exclusively EPA, and it does push the total up pretty high. I think most of the studies that showed conflicting results were using high DHA, so I'm trying to replicate the recommended ratio. I'd read doctor's comments in response to someone indicating their child was on 3,000mg, saying that could be dangerous, and recommending under 2,000, but now I'm wondering if 1,600 is safe. (My DD is 7 years old, close to 60 lbs.) Will have to read more...

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I'm going to have to read up more on this. I've been giving my daughter 1,600mg of Omega 3's, with a high EPA to DHA ratio, which I'd seen recommended in at least a couple of places. This requires taking two supplements, one that is almost exclusively EPA, and it does push the total up pretty high. I think most of the studies that showed conflicting results were using high DHA, so I'm trying to replicate the recommended ratio. I'd read doctor's comments in response to someone indicating their child was on 3,000mg, saying that could be dangerous, and recommending under 2,000, but now I'm wondering if 1,600 is safe. (My DD is 7 years old, close to 60 lbs.) Will have to read more...

Nature Girl, look at the bottle and see the amount of EPA and DHA combined. What I linked refers to EPA and DHA but most fish oils also include ALA. Edited by Guest

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I use two different brands (one also includes GLA) and I alternate them. We also take breaks from fish oil altogether every few months. Our highest EPA+DHA brand is at 1,250 mg. My youngest is almost 8 1/2. 

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 I just lost a long post so let me try this again. 

 

Ananemone, now that I am sitting at a computer instead of typing with one finger on a tablet, I'll try to explain a bit more what I am talking about. 

 

 

From Nemechek's website, same link as before, Just concentrating all the references to dosage in one place:

 

  

This is from NIH (National Institutes of Health):

 

 

Found here:

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-HealthProfessional/

Based on FDA recommendations, daily EPA and DHA should not exceed 2g/day from dietary supplements. 2g meaning therefore 2,000 mg EPA and DHA. In Nemechek's protocol, let's assume a "heavy" 12 yr old taking the maximum preteen dose of 3,000 mg of EPA and DHA per day. This child is now exceeding the recommended FDA daily dose of EPA and DHA by 1,000 mg. If in 2 months this child does not show improvement and based on his approach of doubling the dosage, this child will now be taking 6,000 mg of EPA and DHA, therefore 4,000 mg above the FDA recommended. Now let's assume a teen at the maximum 4,000 mg dose. He is exceeding by 2,000 mg and if doubled at 2 months (therefore 8,000 mg EPA and DHA) he is now exceeding the FDA's recommended max by 6,000 mg.

 

What am I misunderstanding here? Is it not clear that he uses these dosages and then doubles them? 

 

My quotes from Jennifer Giustra-Kozek were to show that people have most certainly used inulin from food sources and have had results but most sources that I saw recommend using, not eliminating, probiotics. Previous quote from Giustra-Kozek's book:

 

This is consistent with some research I did. 

 

Another quote I posted up thread from the University of Maryland:

 

 

Found here.

 

Adding a quote from Dr. Kenneth Bock's book Healing the New Childhood Epidemics:

 

 

Note, his (meaning Dr. Bock's) protocol does not have any recommendations for exceeding the FDA limits and none of the approximately 20 supplements I randomly chose to look at to see what is available exceed it if you take the dosage recommended on the bottle. So, he (Nemechek) is recommending exceeding what is recommended on the bottle and recommending doubling dosages if you do not see results when studies have shown that fish oil does not help every case.

 

The immune/ gut/ brain connection has been studied and is being studied by many experts in the medical field. I read and have read, watched documentaries, etc. and nothing is cut and dried. There are so many variables based on disorder, genes, even going down to individual case when you have complexities and various different disorders influencing what the person is experiencing. So, for this man to be stating that his single protocol is going to have the same outcome for all these different disorders goes beyond simplistic. It is outrageous. 

 

In regards to the op, the word aggressive was probably an unsuitable choice of word, but she has been defensive from the start with whomever has not agreed, or has had a different opinion, or has just simply tried to caution her out of concern. The "to each his own" was used on numerous occasions when most were just trying to voice an opinion or address a concern. As for me, certain language was used twice while quoting my posts and that I found offensive. 

 

I had to explain my position and now I am walking away. 

I reread my posts just now looking for the aggressive/defensive tone that you mentioned and really did fail to see it?  But holy I like "!!!!"'s  LOL! 

 

Anyway - sorry my "tone" doesn't read well when I type.  My "to each his own" was just literally that.  I don't find that to be offensive wording but I guess some might.  I see it as what it is - this worked for me but you do what works for you.  With peace and love.  No biggie on my end.  Do I hope/want this protocol to help all the kids?  Absolutely!!  Am I offended that it has some people's backs up?  Not at all!  I really am a WYSIWYG person.  I will tell you when I am offended.   I am happy that some are curious and nonplussed by those who aren't.  I really can't stress that enough. 

 

I have been on this earth long enough to know the reaction people will have to "I cured my daughter with inulin and omega 3" - none of this surprises me or offends me. 

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I give a 500mg EPA (looks like it contains ONLY EPA), and THIS which I'm now trying to interpret. It says it has 1070mg long-chain Omega 3 fatty acids, around 900mg of which are EPA and DHA. But looking closer it says it has 3060mg of fish oil total, so...Is the issue with fish oil in general or just with the Omega 3's??

Edited by nature girl

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I always only speak for myself and to me quite a few of your comments sounded defensive, which was fine at first. I knew you were trying to share your joy and experience with others after a devastating situation, but your choice of words in certain instances, where I come from, brings down the level of the conversation and detracts from specific points made. This is a public conversation on what, to me, is a serious topic; our kids' health. But again, speaking for myself.

 

My goal was to inform/ caution others. What people do with that information is entirely up to them. As parents we have the right to make our own choices for our own children. When we are recommending something to others though, we bear the responsibility to also inform them of the risks. The FDA and Health Canada post warnings for a reason. What we do with that information is up to us, for our own family. I don't care about popularity status but I do always feel the responsibility of informing/ cautioning if I know of a potential risk. That's just the way I am!

 

I hope all continues to work well for your daughter.

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