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Book a Week 2018 - BW45: Nonfiction November


Robin M
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Happy Sunday and welcome to week forty-five in our Open Roads Reading Adventure. Greetings to all our readers and everyone following our progress. Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks  to share a link to your book reviews.

Welcome to Nonfiction November. This month we are jumping into the world of nonfiction which encompasses a wide variety of categories including but not limited to -  memoirs and essays, history and geography, comedy and cookbooks and crafts, language and technology, religion and philosophy, music and art, to law and political science, self-help and travel, to writing and reference books.   

Nonfiction is no longer books full of dry facts and figures and has expanded quite a bit over the years with the advent of literary or creative nonfiction  writing which uses the literary styles and techniques of fiction to tell a factual story. There are a wide variety of writing books I've enjoyed reading which teach the art of creative nonfiction which includes Dinty Moore's Crafting the Personal Essay and Flash Nonfiction, Peter Turchi's Maps of the ImaginationJack Hart's A Writer's Coach, and  A Nonfiction Writers' Guide from the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University Telling True Stories.   

There are many entertaining, well written creative nonfiction stories such as  Joan Didion's Slouching towards Bethlehem, to Annie Dillard's The Writing Life and Anne Lamont's Bird by Bird.  Can you tell I have writing on my brain today? *grin*  Take a look at Goodread's long list of Popular Creative Nonfiction reads and check out the variety of authors from Truman Capote, Barbara Kingsolver,  Maya Angelou to John Berendt, Frank McCourt, Neil Gaiman, and John Muir.  Take a look at Esquire's picks of the 40 Best Nonfiction Books in 2018 so far, as well as 25 Best True Crime books, plus Barnes and Nobles 50 Nonfiction Books that will make you Smarter in 2018.

 

Flower of the month

 Our Blossom Bookology flower of the month is the Daisy.  There are a number of directions to go for this month's challenge. Read one book per letter using either the title and/or the first or last name of the author. Yes, you can mix it up. You may read a book with the name of the flower, color of the flower in the title, or on the cover. Another possibility is a book which takes place in the time period or flower's country of origin or has some cultural significance and/or symbolism of the flower. The choices are unlimited.

Brit Tripping


Our Brit Trip is taking us down Watling Way to Staffordshire. 

Staffordshire has a history of being a significant pottery center for centuries.

Rabbit trails: More Pottery,  Croxden Abbey,  Letocetum Roman Baths and Museum

 

Kristin Lavransdatter Readalong

 

Book Three – The Cross
Part II – Debtors  Chapter  1 – 8 (160 pages)

 What are you reading?

Link to week 44  

 

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Good morning.  Did you all remember to set your clocks back?  I'm currently reading Nalini Singh Archangel's Prophecy, # 11 in the Guild Hunter series.  I have lots of non fiction books in my stacks that I've been meaning to read and never get around to them.  In my stacks: 

In Defense of a Liberal Education by Fareed Zakaria,
The Lemon Tree by Sandy Tolan,
Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea, 
Stacy Schiff's Cleopatra 
Quiet by Susan Pain. 

Realistically, I know I'll only read one.

Edited by Robin M
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2 minutes ago, Robin M said:

 I have lots of non fiction books in my stacks that I've been meaning to read and never get around to them.  

Me too, Robin. So many. 

Clocks don't change here in this part of the world. 

I read Journey to a Mountain - 4 Stars - This book would only be of interest to Baha’is. It’s the first in a series of three, about the establishment of one of the shrines in Haifa, Israel. The shrine and the gardens surrounding it, which I’ve had the bounty of visiting a few times, are a UNESCO World Heritage site. 

The story is moving and dramatic. I knew much of it already, but there were also things that I didn’t know or had forgotten. Why is it that one can read the silliest, most trivial books and remember pointless details, and then one reads the meaningful, deeper books, and one forgets things over time? Grrrr … Annoying! Anyway, I enjoyed reading this so much. I would give it 5 stars. Honestly, I would. I have to give it 4 stars, since I get irritated by too many endnotes. At least my edition wasn’t on the Kindle. If it was, I would probably lose my mind. Me, the Kindle, and endnotes do not agree. 

Back to the book, it was thoroughly researched, compelling, and beautifully written. I cannot wait to read the other books in this series. 

51oiWU0VhnL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine. 
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable 
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.

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This week I finished George Eliot's Adam Bede (Warwickshire) and Henry Green's 1929 debut [edit: sorry, second] novel Living (West Midlands). Reading these back-to-back was an amazing experience. They were written seventy years apart and are set one hundred and thirty years apart, both of them about skilled and unskilled laborers of the Midlands and the complexities of their personal relationships amid the hard work of their lives as part of a tight-knit community with its joys and dangers, some of the dangers inflicted only half-understandingly by their social betters. In Adam Bede these laborers are rural; in Living they work in a Birmingham ("Brummagem" to its inhabitants) iron foundry; but their lives (and dialect!) are essentially the same. Reading one after the other leaves you wondering what the Industrial Revolution really changed.

From Living:

Quote

'Why in course she do. Look 'ere Joe, what's Craigan at in your 'ouse.'
'It ain't my 'ouse, it's is'n.'
'What's 'e at, anyroad.'
In another public Mr Dale alone sat about, not drinking.
'What d'you mean, what's 'e at?'
'Do 'im pay'er Friday nights,' Mr Tupe said.
'I think 'e do,' said Mr Gates. They talked and Gates confided more in Tupe who got mysterious more and more. Each spoke in broader country accent they had come from to Birmingham, speaking louder.
Getting more drunk Gates forgot seriousness and said what good thing that Dale went to pub, which he did not do before, it would anger Mr Craigan, He was good lad, Gates said, he did not expect you to do your own and three others' work, like some expected. A drop of beer would do him good, say who would water was lion's drink. But Craigan now, if you looked up two moments at work he was down your throat, and then in evenings, in their house it was like being in a hearse with wireless to it: 'Dirty ice-faced 'ermit,' Gates said, holding sides, he was laughing at his own image in a glass, ''e'd listen to the weather reports so long that 'e wouldn't tell what it was doin' outside, rainin', snowing or sleet.'

No those are not typos; Living is an experimental novel and the narrator "speaks" in an unusual style that takes some getting used to.

For Staffordshire, I'm planning on Arnold Bennett's The Old Wives' Tale, about life in the Staffordshire Potteries (which Robin mentions). Also this week I need to re-read Boethius' sixth-century classic The Consolation of Philosophy and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, for Middle Girl's homeschooling. Hint for the curious: read the Behn.

Edited by Violet Crown
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Hello everyone! This past week I finished Katherine's Marriage by D.E. Stevenson. I liked it ok, but think I need a break from this author. There were a few things that bugged me about the characters but maybe it's just me haha. I also finished Vittoria Cottage earlier in the week by the same author and enjoyed that one much more. 

Haven't picked up Kristin L. in a couple weeks but will get back to it soon.

I'm re-reading The Angry Tide which I think is number 7 or 8 in the Poldark series. Anyone else been watching the new season (for us in the US) of Poldark on PBS? I've caught a few of the episodes but the adaptation from book to tv is disappointing. I still watch though. ?

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"Spooky" October is now complete. I read World War Z, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Sunshne (Robin McKinley) and enjoyed them all. Up next I have The Alchemist for our November book club pick. I'm also reading Jo Boaler's Mathematical Mindsets for geeky math teacher inspiration.

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2 hours ago, Robin M said:

 

Nonfiction is no longer books full of dry facts and figures and has expanded quite a bit over the years with the advent of literary or creative nonfiction  writing which uses the literary styles and techniques of fiction to tell a factual story. There are a wide variety of writing books I've enjoyed reading which teach the art of creative nonfiction which includes Dinty Moore's Crafting the Personal Essay and Flash Nonfiction, Peter Turchi's Maps of the ImaginationJack Hart's A Writer's Coach, and  A Nonfiction Writers' Guide from the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University Telling True Stories.   

There are many entertaining, well written creative nonfiction stories such as  Joan Didion's Slouching towards Bethlehem, to Annie Dillard's The Writing Life and Anne Lamont's Bird by BirdCan you tell I have writing on my brain today? *grin*  Take a look at Goodread's long list of Popular Creative Nonfiction reads and check out the variety of authors from Truman Capote, Barbara Kingsolver,  Maya Angelou to John Berendt, Frank McCourt, Neil Gaiman, and John Muir.  Take a look at Esquire's picks of the 40 Best Nonfiction Books in 2018 so far, as well as 25 Best True Crime books, plus Barnes and Nobles 50 Nonfiction Books that will make you Smarter in 2018.

  

 

Me too. I've got a stack of new writing books on my nightstand that I'm slowly trying to read through.

Plotting Your Novel by Janice Hardy

Scene and Structure by Jack Bickham

Wired for Story by Lisa Cron

I'm also reading through a few Daisy Dalrymple novels trying to get caught up on my Brit Tripping. They're all like 270 pages and can be read in two nights so it's like Halloween candy for your brain.

 

Edited by aggieamy
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Over the past few days, I finished:

the novella The Tea Master and the Detective  by Aliette de Bodard which proved to be an interesting read.  Somehow I'd hoped for more, but I would try another work by the same author.

"Welcome to the Scattered Pearls Belt, a collection of ring habitats and orbitals ruled by exiled human scholars and powerful families, and held together by living mindships who carry people and freight between the stars. In this fluid society, human and mindship avatars mingle in corridors and in function rooms, and physical and virtual realities overlap, the appareance of environments easily modified and adapted to interlocutors or current mood.

A transport ship discharged from military service after a traumatic injury, The Shadow's Child now ekes out a precarious living as a brewer of mind-altering drugs for the comfort of space-travellers. Meanwhile, abrasive and eccentric scholar Long Chau wants to find a corpse for a scientific study. When Long Chau walks into her office, The Shadow's Child expects an unpleasant but easy assignment. When the corpse turns out to have been murdered, Long Chau feels compelled to investigate, dragging The Shadow's Child with her.

As they dig deep into the victim's past, The Shadow's Child realises that the investigation points to Long Chau's own murky past…and, ultimately, to the dark and unbearable void that lies between the stars…"
**

Martha Wells' novella Rogue Protocol   which is the third in The Murderbot Diaries.  I enjoyed this and am looking forward to the fourth episode.  This is a series that should definitely be read in order; begin with All Systems Red.
**

I also read Kelly Jensen's contemporary romance novella Best in Show  which was enjoyable though I don't think I'll be re-reading it in a hurry.  (Adult content)

"Solitary mystery writer Julian Wilkes doesn’t want a pet, but his sister persuades him to visit Lingwood Animal Rescue, where he is immediately taken with a large ginger tabby cat. Before he can settle into the joys of cat ownership, however, he discovers something very unusual about his new companion.

Macavity Birch is cursed. By day he is a large tabby cat. At night he can be himself—a human male with ginger hair and oddly yellow eyes. He didn’t mean to end up in the animal rescue, but he never meant any harm when playing the prank that resulted in his curse, either. Happily, Julian adopts him. But while exploring his host’s home, he discovers the diary of a long-dead relative.

Unfortunately, not all of Mac’s ancestors are dead and buried. His great-great-great-grandmother is very much alive, and she’s a powerful witch who doesn’t take kindly to the sharing of family secrets. When Mac reveals himself to Julian in order to save him from bigger trouble, he achieves just the opposite, plunging Julian deeper into a magical mystery with him."
**

And, just to prove I don't only read novellas, I finished Jennifer Gracen's contemporary romance It Might Be You (The Harrisons Book 5) .  While this is the fifth book in the series, it's the first I read and it stands alone well. That said, it took me two weeks to finish, so I didn't find it that compelling.  (Adult content)

"When Officer Nick Martell learns that a sick child needs his help, he flies to the young Harrison boy’s side. But once in the heart of the wealthy Harrison family, Nick faces a shocking truth—he is none other than a Harrison son himself, born of a secret affair. Though the blue-collar bachelor struggles to accept the elite clan as his own, compassion for the vulnerable boy compels him to stay. That, and the deep spark of connection he feels for the child’s beautiful nurse . . .
 
Amanda Kozlov never felt such a strong and sudden passion for a man before. But falling for Nick is not an option—the life the rugged cop leads is too dangerous, the wounds he carries from his explosive family history too fresh. Yet watching Nick bond with the young boy in her care, experiencing tenderness in his arms, Amanda longs to take a chance on the one man who could save the Harrison heir—the only man with the power to shatter her heart. And as drama swirls around them, only time will tell if they’re brave enough to give their love the future it deserves . . ."

Regards,
Kareni
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3 hours ago, Mothersweets said:

Hello everyone! This past week I finished Katherine's Marriage by D.E. Stevenson. I liked it ok, but think I need a break from this author. There were a few things that bugged me about the characters but maybe it's just me haha. I also finished Vittoria Cottage earlier in the week by the same author and enjoyed that one much more. 

Haven't picked up Kristin L. in a couple weeks but will get back to it soon.

I'm re-reading The Angry Tide which I think is number 7 or 8 in the Poldark series. Anyone else been watching the new season (for us in the US) of Poldark on PBS? I've caught a few of the episodes but the adaptation from book to tv is disappointing. I still watch though. ?

I checked the first Katherine book out of Kindle Prime last night, so at some point this month I will be reading it.  It’s easy to over read an author I think, especially one who was really prolific.  I find myself thinking this again......probably why I am stalled in my current Robin Paige book.  ?

Poldark, I am so far behind I am not sure if I am one or two seasons behind.  To make matters worse I have seen enough spoilers so it isn’t going to be easy to figure out where I left off.  I noticed it on Prime and have been thinking about trying to catch up since I did enjoy it.

2 hours ago, aggieamy said:

 

I'm also reading through a few Daisy Dalrymple novels trying to get caught up on my Brit Tripping. They're all like 270 pages and can be read in two nights so it's like Halloween candy for your brain.

 

I really like Daisy and if a book setting is undesirable I just skip it.  I skipped the Dentist one! ?  Glad you are enjoying these.

I actually read som KL last week.  Still not caught up but enjoying it but I hate that fat book.  My library has The Cross on kindle and I can’t wait to get to that point!

I finished Meet Me at the Museum this afternoon and I really enjoyed it.  It’s a book of letters between two unlikely correspondents,  a Danish museum curator and a farm wife in Norfolk.  Both are searching for a friend and find each other via a letter the farm wife sends to the museum in Denmark.  The pictures painted by the book were oddly exacting for me regarding life in rural England.  I wonder if I should have read this book first!  I wonder if the Danish parts were as accurate.......I gave the book a 3 so it was not wonderful.......the parts I enjoyed were bits about stupid suicidal pheasants and the wedding scenes.  No one else would honestly find these bits interesting.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36237290-meet-me-at-the-museum. It also was one of those novels with the popular lack of closure, potential for anything endings, which for me at least is disappointing.

 

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Currently free to Kindle readers ~

Zombies:  Arcadium  by Sarah Gray 

mystery:  Interview with a Ghost  by Angela Pepper  

romance:  Dancing Tides (A Pelican Pointe Novel Book 3)  by Vickie McKeehan

The Beast of Talesend (Beaumont and Beasley Book 1)  by Kyle Shultz

Mission: Improper (London Steampunk: The Blue Blood Conspiracy Book 1)  by Bec McMaster

Regards,
Kareni

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4 hours ago, aggieamy said:

I'm also reading through a few Daisy Dalrymple novels trying to get caught up on my Brit Tripping. They're all like 270 pages and can be read in two nights so it's like Halloween candy for your brain.

You mean you enjoy them at the time but wake up full of queasiness and regrets, as if you had eaten all your smallest child's malted milk balls from her Halloween bag? Oh dear I feel unwell again now.

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3 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

You mean you enjoy them at the time but wake up full of queasiness and regrets, as if you had eaten all your smallest child's malted milk balls from her Halloween bag? Oh dear I feel unwell again now.

LOL. I know exactly how that feels. Every year on Halloween night Kevin and I go to bed and cross our fingers that this isn't the year we wake up at 2 am to a kid puking. Here's hoping we're better parents in 2019 and regulate candy better on Halloween night. 

Edited by aggieamy
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Not a single trick or treater came to our house again this year. Yet we had (and still have) a bag of candy just in case. I made sure to find a bag that included Almond Joys!  Several years ago I trained my music students to bring me all the Almond Joys out of their trick or treat bags -- and they did! What a great group of kids, all of whom are in college now.

No reading finished here last week. Still listening to City of Blades by Robert Jackson Bennett and haven't finished Exit West yet. I have a couple of non-fiction books in progress, too.

Ds and I are heading to a local bookstore to see Brandon Sanderson this week. I doubt we'll stand in line for an autograph as we have ticket #155! I think we'd be in line til midnight!

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1 hour ago, JennW in SoCal said:

 

Ds and I are heading to a local bookstore to see Brandon Sanderson this week. I doubt we'll stand in line for an autograph as we have ticket #155! I think we'd be in line til midnight!

That's awesome! Is he giving a talk of some sort or just a book signing? 

Edited by aggieamy
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Didn't get around to posting here last week, so here's a two-week reading wrap-up:

107. Touch Not the Cat by Mary Stewart - As a teen I read though a big part of Mary Stewart's books, so I figured this one should at least be palatable.  Weird that of all her books, this is the one that hit the bestseller list?  Can't remember if I'd read it before - if I did it was forgettable.  I have fond memories of The Moon Spinners, Airs Above the Ground, Nine Coaches Waiting... this one's a bit odd with our telepathic heroine calling her telepathic friend her 'lover' even though she's not quite sure who he is except that she's pretty darn sure he's one of her second cousins.  Um, okay?  3 stars for still managing to be reasonably readable in spite of that.  But I'd have to say my least favorite Mary Stewart.

108. Dark Orbit by Carolyn Ives Gilman - for my SciFi book club. A planet that seems to have an unusual concentration of Dark Matter is discovered and folks are sent out to check it out.  Things are weird.  What if some of the wacky physics laws that happen at the quantum level could happen at the macro level (perhaps because of the dark matter or whatever the heck it is).  And also some philosophical musings that had a good amount of overlap with that Buddhist book I just read.  4 stars.

109. The Winter's Tale by Shakespeare -  Bit of a wack play, starts as a tragedy, ends as a comedy. And yeah, Bohemia doesn't have a coast, and if everyone's consulting the Oracle at Delphi are we still supposed to be in pagan Roman or Greek times, which makes no sense based on other things going on (like, Russia and Bohemia are places that exist). Did Shakespeare mail this one in?  I'm going to read the Hogarth 'retelling' of this, so thought I should read the source material first.  3 stars.

110. Die schwarze Spinne / The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf - thankfully very short book about the devil coming to strike a bargain with some put-upon peasants sometime in the middle ages. It does not go well for them.  A Swiss book - in standard German but sprinkled liberally with Swiss-isms, most of which were easy to figure out except one that wasn't in the dictionary and when I googled it the only thing that came up was this book - but thankfully with a note saying what the word meant (something like a window sill).  Moral of the story: don't make deals with the devil.  2.5 stars.

111.  The Wife (Kristin Lavransdatter #2) - I did enjoy this book, but think I'm ready to take a break from Kristin and Erlend.  Will probably finish the last book sometime next year. 4 stars.

112. Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen by Jose Antonio Vargas (ebook) - I thought this book was very well done.  Vargas just tells his story.  His story doesn't fit the standard narrative - he's Filipino, not Mexican, doesn't speak Spanish in spite of his Spanish name.  With the help of a lot of mentors in high school and later at work, he was able to 'pass' as a citizen for many years and had well-paying, prestigious jobs. He was a few months too old to qualify for "Dreamer" status (he was brought here by adults as a child and didn't know he was not legally here till he applied for a driver's license). But he finally couldn't take the stress of hiding and lying and 'came out', rendering himself unemployable and a target for deportation - but somehow he hasn't been deported, in spite of testifying before congress, writing quite publicly about his status, and even being detained in one of those cages when he went to report on refugees crossing the Mexican/US border.  He's not sure himself why.  Too high profile?  But he's still stuck with no way to even apply for US citizenship in the country he grew up in. 5 stars.

113. Copenhagen by Michael Frayn -  I really enjoyed this drama, which is a conversation among the ghosts of Bohr, his wife, and Heisenberg.  5 stars.

114. The Woman in White by Wilkie Colllins (audiobook) - While I could see the plot 'twists' coming a mile away, it was still reasonably enjoyable.  But I'm glad I listened to it on audio - I think I would have gotten bogged down in print.  And can someone please explain to me how (spoiler in white) Hartwright managed to marry a woman who had been declared legally dead?  That is never addressed... 3 stars.

Currently reading: 

- All Strangers are Kin: Adventures in Arabic and the Arab World by Zora O'Neill - A one-time student of classical Arabic decides she'd like to learn much more about the Arabic that people actually speak - in many variations.  Fun for linguistic nerds like me. 

- Everything Here is Beautiful by Mira T. Lee (audiobook) - About two sisters, one of whom struggles with mental illness.

- Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente (ebook) - Her sentences and descriptions can be amazing.  But all her writing does make me feel like she's mixing meth and LSD...

- Der Prozess / The Trial by Franz Kafka - Have just started this.  The first stuff I read by Kafka was some unfinished short stories I think found after his death, which were nuts.  But I read Metamorphosis last year and that was good, so I decided to give some of his more polished work a chance (although this was also released posthumously...).  

- The Crab-Flower Club (The Story of the Stone vol. 2) by Cao Xueqin - I have swapped this for KL as my 'read 100 pages a week' book.  I'm really enjoying this - this translation is considered by many the 'best', and I can see why.  These two quotes from reviewers at Goodreads spoke to me... "The Story of the Stone is an immensely fun, inviting, and enjoyable novel, but explaining why it is so is a bit of a challenge." and "It's kinda silly how much I loved reading this, when spoiled Chinese aristocrats writing poetry really oughtta be boring."  Yep, I can't explain it either, but I agree with them...

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An excerpt from The Old Wives' Tale apropos the BritTripping:

Quote

The county is happy in not exciting remark. It is content that Shropshire should possess that swollen bump, the Wrekin, and that the exaggerated wildness of the Peak should lie over its border. It does not desire to be a pancake like Cheshire. It has everything that England has, including thirty miles of Watling Street; and England can show nothing more beautiful and nothing uglier than the works of nature and the works of man to be seen within the limits of the county. It is England in little, lost in the midst of England, unsung by searchers after the extreme; perhaps occasionally somewhat sore at this neglect, but how proud in the instinctive cognizance of its representative features and traits!

Thus Staffordshire. The entire first chapter is a meditation on the county, the Potteries, and the Five Towns (Hanbridge [Hanley], Bursley [Burslem], Knype [Stoke], Longshaw [Longton], and Turnhill [Tunstall]).

Edited by Violet Crown
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Since I last posted, I've finished 6 books.

I finished listening to Hitman Anders and the Meaning of Everything by Jonas Jonasson.    It was kind of amusing.   A priest, a receptionist and a hitman start a business together.   Not killing people, but roughing people up.   Then they start a religion together.    Focused heavily on the passages from the Bible that talk about drinking wine.   It was very tongue in cheek about the Christian religion, and if you are oversensitive about religion being made fun of definitely skip this one.  

I read The Tatooist of Auschwitz.   This novel just didn't ring true to me.   At the end it turned out that it was allegedly based on an actual person who the author had some conversations with.  The main character kept getting out of this situations, and having "relations" regularly in the camp with his girlfriend, and I'm just not believing it.   Which may be very judgmental of me, but whatever.

I also read Same Beach Next Year Dorothea Benton Frank.   This author has a lot of books, so I just thought I would try one.   Definitely not for me, it felt like the adult version of the Magic Tree House books.   Only I think Magic Tree House may have more interesting dialog...

The After Party by Disclafani was more interesting.   It was set in Texas in the 50's and centered around 2 friends and their friendship.   I really appreciated one of the themes of the book which was, just because a friend does a really huge thing for you, doesn't mean that you owe them the rest of your life.   It's such an important theme that I have struggled with in my own life.   

I read The Duchess about Camilla Parker-Bowles.   It was ok.   It really lagged at the end.   But, there really is always another side to every story. 

I listened to Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain and I absolutely cannot recommend it to anyone, ever.   I watch and like his show, but definitely skip the book.   He was trying too hard to come across as a weird gross rebel, and he succeeded.  And the thought of ever eating in another restaurant makes me queasy now.

The last book I listened to was Vox by Dalcher.   It was set in a dystopian world where women aren't allowed to speak more than 100 words a day.   I read a review that called it "overblown" and I have to agree.   It was an interesting concept.   But, it felt VERY political and pointed.   Like it was being crammed down my throat.  And, the story wasn't as well developed as it could have been.

Now I have to find something for this week!

 

 

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Popping in from work during my dinner break.  Whole county has has an AT&T outage except for our little bubble of neighborhood around the shop. My guys have called a dozen times already bored out of their minds.  Internet withdrawal. Poor things.  ?

Came across a couple interesting sites 

Quill, weren't you talking about weaving?    Weaving Anni Alberts  back into art history

Plus Get your Literature MOOC on from Bookriots.

 

@aggieamy I thoroughly enjoyed Wired for Story.   Charles Baxter's Art of Subtext and Joan Silber's Art of Time in Fiction are equally good and short at about 120 pages but jammed packed. Well worth reading. 

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This afternoon I finished the anthology Irregulars: Stories  by Nicole Kimberling, Josh Lanyon, Ginn Hale, and Astrid Amara which I enjoyed.  I think some might find the first story rather difficult to swallow (pun intended) as it deals with a challenging subject (shades of Beau Crusoe, @mumto2 ).  (Adult content)

"NATO's Irregulars Affairs Division is a secret organization operating in thousands of cities around the globe. Its agents police relations between the earthly realm and those beyond this world, protecting us from terrible dangers as well as enthralling temptations.

These agents--Irregulars, as they are known to the few who know them at all--are drawn to the work for their own reasons and close cases in their own unique ways.

Agent Henry Falk--an undead tramp brought back for a mission that might finally put him into a grave he can't climb back out of.

Agent Keith Curry--a former carnivore chef turned vegetarian currently dealing with a goblin problem.

Agent Rake--a tough and ambitious guy with a penchant for easy living and dangerous games.

Agent Silas August--an uncompromising jerk with a dead partner and an assignment babysitting an assassin.


Four adventures from four award-winning authors, all set in one amazing world. Is your security clearance high enough to read on?"
**

My husband and I leave early (EARLY) Wednesday morning to attend my niece's wedding; I'm hoping for a good trip and enjoyable festivities. I look forward to seeing my sister for the first time since our mother's death.  My sister and I spent so much time together then that I've missed her. 

I'll likely have next to no internet while away, so I'll get caught up on the thread here after my return home.

Happy reading all ~

Regards,
Kareni

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Kareni, Safe travels!  I am glad you will be enjoying being with your sister at a joyous occasion.  I think that will make for an easy reunion for lack of a better description.   I am sure you have some great travel reading planned.

Btw, I started Murder in Honour last night.  It is my latest Anne Cleeland in the series.   I started it while Dh was watching a movie that I find hard to ignore although I have no desire to watch AGAIN ........the voices get me.  Anyway I needed to start a book where the characters would instantly draw me in and I picked Acton and Doyle!  ?

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Thank you, mumto2.  I'll be taking my Kindle along as well as at least one paperback; heaven forbid I should be without reading materials if my Kindle fails! 

I hope you'll enjoy Murder in Honour.  Now you have me thinking of re-reading the series ....

Regards,
Kareni

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9 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Thank you, mumto2.  I'll be taking my Kindle along as well as at least one paperback; heaven forbid I should be without reading materials if my Kindle fails! 

I hope you'll enjoy Murder in Honour.  Now you have me thinking of re-reading the series ....

Regards,
Kareni

I now take two forms of kindle readers!?. My kindle died, truly dead a few years ago on the train to the airport to go to the US and hubby had convinced me to skip a paper book.  I had to buy a less than satisfying book for my journey....I wanted something different that dd could read too, so YA. Probably the most inappropriate YA ever. ( No, I don’t remember the title before someone asks)  Gak....dreadful, eye burning, no way I could give it to my daughter,  I donated it to the airline.  I was lucky for the movies.....

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@Matryoshka I can’t seem to read the whited out area on my iPad.  I never needed to know the trick because it was a very light gray on my fire so I could read spoilers if I desired by enlarging the type.  Just found a Fire to read it on and can’t,  must be a board upgrade.  Anyway not ignoring your question simply can’t read it.  I don’t guarantee I know the answer as Woman in White was a book a listened to several months ago........

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12 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I now take two forms of kindle readers!?. My kindle died, truly dead a few years ago on the train to the airport to go to the US and hubby had convinced me to skip a paper book.  I had to buy a less than satisfying book for my journey...

Yikes!  To be traveling without good reading matter is a horrible thing to contemplate, so I can appreciate taking two Kindles.

Regards,
Kareni

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56 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

It doesn't show up if you highlight the white text?

I thought that was what I needed to do but can’t get it to work when I tap,  but I just quoted and that let me read it.  I think the answer would be that incident happened when using a different name then the problem is under.

When I have a chance planning to have dd show me how to highlight at Wtm.  All I do is accidentally highlight while reading on the iPad and when I want to I can’t!  

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41 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

I thought that was what I needed to do but can’t get it to work when I tap,  but I just quoted and that let me read it.  I think the answer would be that incident happened when using a different name then the problem is under.

So, you think she was using the other name at the time?  But then legally he wouldn't be attached to the right person, and the ending as written wouldn't be possible...

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Let’s see if I can do this.....

Laura was committed using Anne’s name, so Anne not Laura was insane..  I think the marriage occurred using the legal names.

I typed in white and have no idea about typo’s!  Essentially I think a Parrish Vicar could make the decision at that time.

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1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

Let’s see if I can do this.....

Laura was committed using Anne’s name, so Anne not Laura was insane..  I think the marriage occurred using the legal names.

I typed in white and have no idea about typo’s!  Essentially I think a Parrish Vicar could make the decision at that time.

 

Yes, but Laura had been legally declared dead.  She was not recognized by the lawyer or her uncle as being alive.  The vicar could raise her from the dead to marry her?

The only way I could guess that works is that in those days before the internet you could just claim to be whoever you wanted even for legal purposes, but no one would bother to confirm your identity in any way, just have you sign whatever name you claimed to have?  But that very much doesn't seem to be the case for all the other legal problems they have related to this plot point.

Also... under her true name, she's still married, as no one has confirmed her husband's death.  And if they did that, they'd find out that he died a 'widower', so how could his wife remarry?  There's that too!

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I totally get what you are saying and I could be putting some personal feelings into this book ? But parishes have tons of power within a village.  I think she was married in her village church in Cumbria the second time too.  It has been awhile.  I was thinking he knew her, thus knew she was alive.

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1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

I totally get what you are saying and I could be putting some personal feelings into this book ? But parishes have tons of power within a village.  I think she was married in her village church in Cumbria the second time too.  It has been awhile.  I was thinking he knew her, thus knew she was alive.


LOL.  I liked the story overall, but plot holes you could drive a truck through can bug me like a rock in my shoe on an otherwise lovely hike... ?

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On 10/25/2018 at 8:03 PM, mumto2 said:

It is probably the rose flavor that makes us not like it.  We have never tried Aplets &Cotlets but am positive dd and I would happily indulge.  Not sure about the guys!  ?.I actually do know hubby would hate it because of apples and apricots.  Seriously, how did a girl who grew up on a fruit farm marry someone who dislikes fruit!

My mom used to make an incredible fruit cake that was really candy,  coconut, dried fruit, nuts, and condensed milk. The kid’s and I were expecting something like that to be Turkish Delight and it really missed the mark.

I forgot to comment on this a week ago. That sounds really good. I'm going to try the other recipe you posted near Christmas. I think my people would love it.

21 hours ago, Robin M said:

 I thoroughly enjoyed Wired for Story.   Charles Baxter's Art of Subtext and Joan Silber's Art of Time in Fiction are equally good and short at about 120 pages but jammed packed. Well worth reading. 

Thanks for the recommendation. I'll put them on my to-read list.

20 hours ago, Kareni said:

My husband and I leave early (EARLY) Wednesday morning to attend my niece's wedding; I'm hoping for a good trip and enjoyable festivities. I look forward to seeing my sister for the first time since our mother's death.  My sister and I spent so much time together then that I've missed her. 

I'll likely have next to no internet while away, so I'll get caught up on the thread here after my return home.

Happy reading all ~

Regards,
Kareni

Have a nice trip! You'll be missed around here.

19 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I now take two forms of kindle readers!?. My kindle died, truly dead a few years ago on the train to the airport to go to the US and hubby had convinced me to skip a paper book.  I had to buy a less than satisfying book for my journey....I wanted something different that dd could read too, so YA. Probably the most inappropriate YA ever. ( No, I don’t remember the title before someone asks)  Gak....dreadful, eye burning, no way I could give it to my daughter,  I donated it to the airline.  I was lucky for the movies.....

My first big international trip I took with my parents and brother circa 2006 or 2007. We went to Germany for three weeks and I only packed a carry on bag. Of course I also packed books and since the books where I was going would be in German I had to pack enough books for the entire trip. I assumed an average reading rate of one book every two days on the trip. Yes. I packed 11 library books in my carry on case for vacation. Now I just take a kindle. In case of emergency I can use DD or DH's kindle. I don't know what they'd do but I think they'd understand it was for the greater good.

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Have a wonderful time at your nieces wedding Kareni!

Making a nod at Mothersweets comment about Stevenson’s books,  I’m needing a breather from Wentworth for similar reasons. 

Thanks for asking, at the end of last weeks thread, Robin, I’m doing okay. Your BaW thread, and the challenges, generate an appreciated distraction.

Snorting and grinning at the Halloween candy overload; we don’t have that celebrations lollies or sweets feasting in our region, that translates over to birthday parties and Christmas hauls.  We’ve just celebrated Guy Fawkes here but that comes with letting off fireworks - no sweets hauling there.

 

My current listens/reads:

The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild ~ Lawrence Anthony,  Graham Spence, narrated by Simon Vance   N/F  (audio)

Prayers for Sale ~ Sandra Dallas  (audio)       Tennessee / Colorado  USA Civil war, Depression era.

The Autobiography of George Muller ~ George Muller   N/F  (audio)  London/ Devon/ Bristol/ Wiltshire. 

The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got that Way ~ Bill Bryson   N/F (epukapuka) recommendation from Kareni

The Invisible Child: On Reading and Writing Books for Children ~ Katherine Paterson  N/F   Sip reading, really enjoying this book! 

 

Completed since the start of Nov (incs  Daisy/blossom challenge):

185:  Someday the Rabbi Will Leave ~ Harry Kemelman (3.5) (audio) https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2567506565

186:  The Ivory Dagger: Miss Silver Bk18 ~ Patricia Wentworth  (4-) (audio and ebook) Emsworth, Hampshire

(free ebook collection https://www.fadedpage.com/sc/wentworth.php) https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2479303727?book_show_action=false

187:  Summerhills:  Ayrton Family Bk2 ~ D.E. Stevenson (5)  (audio) Scotland / Nth Yorkshire, England   Gorgeous.  Such a lovely, gentle,  happy ending read – I enjoyed this sequel to Amberwell immensely.  So happy to find out from another BaW mom (Mothersweets, Mumto2, or Amy?)  that there is a third book in this series, Still Glides the Stream, which I hope I can procure somewhere to eventually read.

My fuller review at Goodreads contains a spoiler, so ignore as needed: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2512208289?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1

188:  As Bright as Heaven ~ Susan Meissner  (epukapuka)  (2.5 ) WWI   Pennsylvania / Philadelphia,USA   https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2582985454

188b:  The Magic Finger ~ Roald Dahl  (1) (audio)

189:   Portrait of a Spy ~ Daniel da Silva, narrated by Simon Vance (3) (audio)  Cornwall /  London / Paris / New York / Saudi Arabia / Dubai.   Some really interesting art aspects in this book.   https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2564705264

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23 minutes ago, tuesdayschild said:

Have a wonderful time at your nieces wedding Kareni!

Making a nod at Mothersweets comment about Stevenson’s books,  I’m needing a breather from Wentworth for similar reasons. 

Thanks for asking, at the end of last weeks thread, Robin, I’m doing okay. Your BaW thread, and the challenges, generate an appreciated distraction.

Snorting and grinning at the Halloween candy overload; we don’t have that celebrations lollies or sweets feasting in our region, that translates over to birthday parties and Christmas hauls.  We’ve just celebrated Guy Fawkes here but that comes with letting off fireworks - no sweets hauling there.

 

My current listens/reads:

The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild ~ Lawrence Anthony,  Graham Spence, narrated by Simon Vance   N/F  (audio)

Prayers for Sale ~ Sandra Dallas  (audio)       Tennessee / Colorado  USA Civil war, Depression era.

The Autobiography of George Muller ~ George Muller   N/F  (audio)  London/ Devon/ Bristol/ Wiltshire. 

The Mother Tongue: English and How it Got that Way ~ Bill Bryson   N/F (epukapuka) recommendation from Kareni

The Invisible Child: On Reading and Writing Books for Children ~ Katherine Paterson  N/F   Sip reading, really enjoying this book! 

 

Completed since the start of Nov (incs  Daisy/blossom challenge):

185:  Someday the Rabbi Will Leave ~ Harry Kemelman (3.5) (audio) https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2567506565

186:  The Ivory Dagger: Miss Silver Bk18 ~ Patricia Wentworth  (4-) (audio and ebook) Emsworth, Hampshire

(free ebook collection https://www.fadedpage.com/sc/wentworth.php) https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2479303727?book_show_action=false

187:  Summerhills:  Ayrton Family Bk2 ~ D.E. Stevenson (5)  (audio) Scotland / Nth Yorkshire, England   Gorgeous.  Such a lovely, gentle,  happy ending read – I enjoyed this sequel to Amberwell immensely.  So happy to find out from another BaW mom (Mothersweets, Mumto2, or Amy?)  that there is a third book in this series, Still Glides the Stream, which I hope I can procure somewhere to eventually read.

My fuller review at Goodreads contains a spoiler, so ignore as needed: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2512208289?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1

188:  As Bright as Heaven ~ Susan Meissner  (epukapuka)  (2.5 ) WWI   Pennsylvania / Philadelphia,USA   https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2582985454

188b:  The Magic Finger ~ Roald Dahl  (1) (audio)

189:   Portrait of a Spy ~ Daniel da Silva, narrated by Simon Vance (3) (audio)  Cornwall /  London / Paris / New York / Saudi Arabia / Dubai.   Some really interesting art aspects in this book.   https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2564705264

Glad you are feeling a bit better. ? I have to say NZ imported the better of the fall celebrations!  Although I would guess it isn’t generally a cold wet evening standing as close as you dare to the bonfire...........

Oddly I have the first Daniel da Silva in my stack.  I think I have read a couple random books in this series in the past and hope to read them all over the next year assuming I have finally picked the right series.  The hold was huge!  It has taken me awhile to identify this series which I remembered enjoying.

I wish I had had Goodreads or just continued my old fashioned list keeping.  Actually I did it on Lotus so I could sort by author, anyone remember that accounting program?  I stopped my list for several years when the kids were born and then recorded their books for years!  Back to keeping my own now but on Goodreads.  Anyway,  planning to use Silva for my Art Bingo square so it will be a useful read.

I have read Still Glides the Stream thanks to the library collection.  It was a good typical Stevenson,  as in a nice gentle read.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Glad you are feeling a bit better. ? I have to say NZ imported the better of the fall celebrations!  Although I would guess it isn’t generally a cold wet evening standing as close as you dare to the bonfire...........

Oddly I have the first Daniel da Silva in my stack.  I think I have read a couple random books in this series in the past and hope to read them all over the next year assuming I have finally picked the right series.  The hold was huge!  It has taken me awhile to identify this series which I remembered enjoying.

I wish I had had Goodreads or just continued my old fashioned list keeping.  Actually, I did it on Lotus so I could sort by author, anyone remember that accounting program?  I stopped my list for several years when the kids were born and then recorded their books for years!  Back to keeping my own now but on Goodreads.  Anyway,  planning to use Silva for my Art Bingo square so it will be a useful read.

I have read Still Glides the Stream thanks to the library collection.  It was a good typical Stevenson,  as in a nice gentle read.

 

 

 

2

Grin,  it's late spring, very warm, earthquake-y, sort of weather at the moment, so, no, no bonfire hugging.  Guy Fawkes is a much-loved family tradition!  (Are you able to still have private/personal fireworks nights in the UK, or is it all community run?) 

I enjoyed the Silva book - the wait list here was huge too, and interestingly is the only title of his I can borrow electronically - but it wasn't an absolutely "loved it" read.   The Portrait of a Spy would be perfect for your Art Bingo square.  Do you have any others of his that you'd recommend?  Another member of my household enjoyed The Portrait as lighter reading. (Update: the library now has 3 more of Silva's audiobooks available since my last search.)

ETA: Your book list keeping makes my heart smile !!  

Stevenson is not an author I can source here easily, and our librarys interloan is a little pricey ...     That's good, nice gentle reads are comforting friends to hang out with when things get topsy-turvy. (one of Miss Read's Thrush green books is asking to be read for the "y" in this months blossom challenge)

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1 hour ago, tuesdayschild said:

Grin,  it's late spring, very warm, earthquake-y, sort of weather at the moment, so, no, no bonfire hugging.  Guy Fawkes is a much-loved family tradition!  (Are you able to still have private/personal fireworks nights in the UK, or is it all community run?) 

I enjoyed the Silva book - the wait list here was huge too, and interestingly is the only title of his I can borrow electronically - but it wasn't an absolutely "loved it" read.   The Portrait of a Spy would be perfect for your Art Bingo square.  Do you have any others of his that you'd recommend?  Another member of my household enjoyed The Portrait as lighter reading.

ETA: Your book list keeping makes my heart smile !!  

Stevenson is not an author I can source here easily, and our librarys interloan is a little pricey ...     That's good, nice gentle reads are comforting friends to hang out with when things get topsy-turvy. (one of Miss Read's Thrush green books is asking to be read for the "y" in this months blossom challenge)

There are lots of private fireworks and bonfire displays.  They actually happen more than just bonfire week.  I think it's the darkness that brings on the fascination because it is one of the things that surprised us with the move,  occasional fireworks all winter. The quality that just anyone can buy was a bit of a surprise.  You can buy a huge roll that is a 15 or so minute display,  set it in a field, light the fuse and it's quite a show.  Not a cheap show but impressive quality considering how easy it is to get apparently.  The Lions put on a pretty spectacular display on the cricket grounds for the community......major fundraiser.  There have been a few insurance issues with the event insurance for the huge bonfires so not quite as many as 10 plus years ago.    Btw, we missed bonfire this year and did feel the loss.  Definitely a fun tradition.   Trying to make the dc's a bit more comfortable in their other country.   ;) 

Assuming Silva is the right series the few I have read were quite different in terms of location etc.  They were books I checked out without knowing they were connected until I read a bit.  There was one set in Vienna(I think) that was great!    Not sure if the spy element or the Art was what your dc liked but but Iain Pears series (more Art) is quite good but  more gentle.  

I started a book by V.E.Schwab this morning titled Vicious and it is a page turner.  Close to done but I don't quite know how to class it.....it's a supernatural book about people with extraordinary powers that appear after near death experiences.  Oddly page turning is all i can say.  Sort of the ultimate anti hero book as I find myself cheering a character on who is definitely lacking in most good qualities.

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1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

There are lots of private fireworks and bonfire displays.  They actually happen more than just bonfire week.  I think it's the darkness that brings on the fascination because it is one of the things that surprised us with the move,  occasional fireworks all winter. The quality that just anyone can buy was a bit of a surprise.  You can buy a huge roll that is a 15 or so minute display,  set it in a field, light the fuse and it's quite a show.  Not a cheap show but impressive quality considering how easy it is to get apparently.  The Lions put on a pretty spectacular display on the cricket grounds for the community......major fundraiser.  There have been a few insurance issues with the event insurance for the huge bonfires so not quite as many as 10 plus years ago.    Btw, we missed bonfire this year and did feel the loss.  Definitely a fun tradition.   Trying to make the dc's a bit more comfortable in their other country.   ;) 

Assuming Silva is the right series the few I have read were quite different in terms of location etc.  They were books I checked out without knowing they were connected until I read a bit.  There was one set in Vienna(I think) that was great!    Not sure if the spy element or the Art was what your dc liked but but Iain Pears series (more Art) is quite good but  more gentle.  

I started a book by V.E.Schwab this morning titled Vicious and it is a page turner.  Close to donnae but I don't quite know how to class it.....it's a supernatural book about people with extraordinary powers that appear after near death experiences.  Oddly page turning is all i can say.  Sort of the ultimate anti hero book as I find myself cheering a character on who is definitely lacking in most good qualities.

7

Interesting "Brit " extra!     Feeling for your setting aside, loss, of that fun tradition due to a location change.  Really hope the settling in isn't too bumpy.

The Silva series surrounds Gabriel Allon.  Ooo, thanks for the Iain Pears suggestion!!  

55 minutes ago, texasmom33 said:

I puffy heart LOVE Daniel Silva. I have The Other Woman sitting on my shelf that just arrived. Gabriel Allon is right up with with Uhtred for me, LOL. ?

I can't wait to hear what you think of the Katherine Paterson book. I haven't read one yet, but they're on my want to read list. I've heard Sarah McKenzie quote from her quite often on the Read Aloud Revival podcast and I always love what she reads. 

I was thinking of you the other day when some Bernard Cornwell turned up in my library recommendations.  I may have to try another Silva book as another bibliophile pal says bk12 wasn't the best in the series to read (tut-tut), nor to start with (another tut-tut).   Since you're a Silva appreciator,  I'll wait for your review on The Other Woman. (Our library has that one.)

I'm absolutely enjoying the Katherine Paterson book, only a 1/4 of the way thru,  it's definitely a pause to ponder before I can read on read.  One of Sarah' s podcast with Katherine Paterson, something like "Eavesdropping on the/ a (?) Soul ",  is what encouraged me to purchase it ?

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1 hour ago, texasmom33 said:

I've heard Sarah McKenzie quote from her quite often on the Read Aloud Revival podcast and I always love what she reads. 

That's one of my favorite podcasts. I've gotten so many incredible book recommendations from it. Sarah McKenzie is a gem!

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I feel like this is a book that everyone's already read and talked about for years and I'm just discovering it. The Comic Book History of Comics. I've never been much of a comic book reader with the exception of a few modern graphic novels and the occasional MAD Magazine I could talk my grandparents into buying me in the 1990's. Oh and I've read every single Calvin and Hobbes comic at least a dozen times. This book was still really interesting on the history of comics. Highly recommend to anyone that's interested in comics. Or anyone that just likes quick interesting history books about pop culture. 

I do feel like the person that would enjoy it the most would be someone coming at it with a slight history of the industry already because there were a lot of names thrown at you in a hundred pages and I found I had to keep going back and trying to figure out who everyone was. It would be like trying to understand WWII without ever having heard anything about it and trying to keep track of all the names.

That's kind of how I felt about Jack Kirby who is apparently a big deal in comics and I kept thinking he was Stan Lee. 

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I have some updates since I last posted. These were all Bingo books. Only two left to go!

The Lady and The Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier. I vascillated between three and four stars. I liked it, but it wasn't awesome. It was bawdy (which I dislike) and most of the characters were unlikable. But they didn't rouse my emotions like the love-to-hate Erland of KL. Written or set in the 15th century bingo.

Bait and Other Stories by Mahasweta Devi. Part of the What was Communism series. Stories from the brutal Bengali underworld. These stories took a lot out of me, both emotionally and cognitively and yet they left me somewhat unsatisfied. I would like to read more by this author. Feminist author bingo.

Currently reading: Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (16th century bingo) and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.

 

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I just read Penquin’s update for Bingo which prompted me to update all my challenges........

Bingo.......2 to go,  Art and Microhistory.  I just checked out The Monopolists https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17978108-the-monopolists for Microhistory which has been hard for me to really click with a book.  We collect Monopoly games so hopefully this will be a subject I enjoy!  Never heard of the book before today!

A to Z author......I am done!  Woot!  I will list soon.....

A to Z books, I require this to be first meaningful word.......2 to go.....J (seriously J) and X.......both are on hold or in stack.

Flower challenge.......Marigold needs an I (in stack) and so does Daisy (not in stack)

Brit Tripping.....Technically I think am done but I really need to find one more mystery that works for either Worcestershire or Shropshire. I really want to complete on the mystery bus.  Any fresh ideas Amy or @tuesdayschild , anyone? I have read all the Cadefel books but will reread one if I need to for Shropshire but  somehow it’s not exciting me.  @aggieamy please just tell me a Cadefel that works,  I can’t remember the books well but have watched them so very many times. I actually think he is away from Shropshire in quite a few books so am worried I will read one that doesn’t work.  I am also hoping to improve a few hopefully in the coming weeks.

I have a couple off of Robin’s 52 Books that I am working on but the Agatha Christie in order is ongoing and the Sci Fi/ Fantasy one I need to go through my books better,  I didn’t fill a Goodreads shelf or take notes.  Not sure that I will manage the Sci Fi Challenge this year.

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@mumto2   Shropshire is my last county to read, I'm tempted to use a wildcard.  I have earmarked How the Heather Looks ~ Joan Bodger for Decembers Holly, and, Shropshire. (Another BaW mom, thank you!!,  shared that lovely title  and all the counties visited.)

Worcestershire was  Damsel in Distress. Bk 5 ~ Carola Dunn (3)  

Cadfael is a backup.  Helps you might like off my reading list:  synposis of each book mentioning locations and this map  

 

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I read Escape from Syria by Samya Kullab.  It is a graphic novel that shows the hardships faced by Syrian refugees.  I found it very informative.  I am liking graphic novels as a way of informing myself.  Any recommendations are welcome!

I read The Nesting Place: It Doesn't Have to be Perfect to be Beautiful by Myquillyn Smith.  It is a home decor book and I usually just look at the pictures in home decor books but I read this one.  It's a great book for people on a budget.  It tells you how to enjoy decorating and how to be happy with whatever you have.

 

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22 hours ago, aggieamy said:

 

That's kind of how I felt about Jack Kirby who is apparently a big deal in comics and I kept thinking he was Stan Lee. 

 

Where's the fainting emoji when you need it?  Jack Kirby is The Man when it comes to Golden and Silver Age super hero comics, and there is even a museum devoted to his art and legacy. I got to attend his 80th birthday party back at Comic-Con back in 1985 or 86.  My dh reveres him, but then again, superhero comic books are life here...

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10 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I just read Penquin’s update for Bingo which prompted me to update all my challenges........

Bingo.......2 to go,  Art and Microhistory.  I just checked out The Monopolists https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17978108-the-monopolists for Microhistory which has been hard for me to really click with a book.  We collect Monopoly games so hopefully this will be a subject I enjoy!  Never heard of the book before today!

A to Z author......I am done!  Woot!  I will list soon.....

A to Z books, I require this to be first meaningful word.......2 to go.....J (seriously J) and X.......both are on hold or in stack.

Flower challenge.......Marigold needs an I (in stack) and so does Daisy (not in stack)

Brit Tripping.....Technically I think am done but I really need to find one more mystery that works for either Worcestershire or Shropshire. I really want to complete on the mystery bus.  Any fresh ideas Amy or @tuesdayschild , anyone? I have read all the Cadefel books but will reread one if I need to for Shropshire but  somehow it’s not exciting me.  @aggieamy please just tell me a Cadefel that works,  I can’t remember the books well but have watched them so very many times. I actually think he is away from Shropshire in quite a few books so am worried I will read one that doesn’t work.  I am also hoping to improve a few hopefully in the coming weeks.

I have a couple off of Robin’s 52 Books that I am working on but the Agatha Christie in order is ongoing and the Sci Fi/ Fantasy one I need to go through my books better,  I didn’t fill a Goodreads shelf or take notes.  Not sure that I will manage the Sci Fi Challenge this year.

Alrighty! Let me check my notes and get back to you. *hee hee* I love assigning reading. ?

1 hour ago, JennW in SoCal said:

 

Where's the fainting emoji when you need it?  Jack Kirby is The Man when it comes to Golden and Silver Age super hero comics, and there is even a museum devoted to his art and legacy. I got to attend his 80th birthday party back at Comic-Con back in 1985 or 86.  My dh reveres him, but then again, superhero comic books are life here...

I know I'm such an embarrassment. I hope you're not going to block me after that admission. Now I know who he is and I'm motivated to pick up some of his comics now that I've read all about him.

Even as I wrote that I figured I was as alarming as a non-reader saying ... "Oh yeah, Agatha Christie. She was the one that wrote all those Lord Peter Wimsey stories."

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I finished Archangel's Prophecy which of course had to end in a cliff hanger and the next book won't be out until 2019. Wah!  I think next year is going to be my year of rereads as there a few series which have 2019 releases. 

We are getting smoked out again from the fires up in Paradise. Old friend of hubby's lost his house in Paradise. Fortunately he got out okay.  Poor town is decimated.  Plus the poor folks in Malibu are being inundated. @JennW in SoCal  How are you all doing in your area?

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