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what is your best Science curriculum for


kfeusse
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My 10yo is really liking Sonlight Science 3. It's a lot about animals, which she loves, and reading animal encyclopedias etc.

 

8yo is also doing SL science, but what works REALLY WELL for her and ds6 is the Usborne Science Activities book (Science with Air, Science with Plants, and Science in the Kitchen).

We simply:

 

1. Read a double page

2. Watch the DVD from SL which matches up with the activities in the book.

3. Do the experiments

4. Draw, write and label in science notebook.

 

Quick and easy, once a week, and they love it and are learning.

 

HTH

Edited by LindaOz
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Which science? General science? Biology? Physics? Chem? Earth?

 

What are you just finishing up?

 

Does it need to be secular (just assuming since you've also picked RSO)?

 

Do you like lots of hands on or want something with mostly reading?

 

Elemental Science, or E=Mc2 might work, or another RSO course or maybe Real Science 4 Kids.

 

If you really want to splurge on physics Super Charged Science is awsome!

 

I think that 10 and 6 are kind of hard to combine, you are going to pick one geared more for the other and work up or down (and usually working down is easier). At least the 8yo will probably fit in ;)

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I am doing science with a 2nd grader and a 5th grader.

 

We are using Great Science Adventures. First trimester we are using GSA-Space, second trimester GSA- Human Body, third trimester GSA- Tools and Technology.

 

Currently, we are in our 9th week of GSA-Space. I have not added any books (except a little perusing of books already on my shelf), but we have watched several videos. We have also used the IAU website and the NASA kids' website quite a bit in order to have the most current information. I will definitely be using videos from HowStuffWorks especially when we do anatomy. The New the Way Things Work that is referenced in GSA- Tools and Tech. I will use it, because I already own it and it is a great book. Because I like The New the Way Things Work, I may actually decide to buy The Way We Work. This book was released after GSA- Human Body, so I know it is not referenced.

 

What I liked about GSA-

1. I liked that I could tailor it for use with different ages.

2. I liked that I could cover a topic from Earth science, life science, and physical science each year instead of spending a whole year on one topic.

3. I liked that I could pick and choose which three topics.

4. I liked that there were reproducibles included and that I could pick and choose which ones to do and once I decided which ones I could choose to do them as a disposable ditto sheet, as a notebook page, or make them into minibooks and lapbooks.

5. I liked that there were clear topics, because this made it easier for me to include memory work.

6. I liked that there were clear topics, because this makes it easier to just grab support material weekly at the library.

 

What I don't like about GSA-

1. It is bound as a book, but then includes all this reproducible material. I had the binding cut off.

2. The reproducible material requires prep time on my part. However, I know that if I could buy it all cut out, I wouldn't. So, I suck it up, copy only the pages that I know I want to use, and whip out the handy little paper cutter.

3. The Space volume was written while Pluto was still classified as a planet and before the discovery/ naming of many of the outer planets' moons, so I have needed to do some editing.

 

HTH-

Mandy

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Guest TheBugsMom

We tried Abeka, BJUP, Alpha Omega, SL, WP, and Apologia Elementary for my youngest son. By far he loved the Apologia Elementary Series. He would walk around with the books asking us "Did you know..." all the time. He has completed this group of books for several years now, but will return to then for answers to science questions he has now. He has even informed my dd that she will love these books when she gets old enough to use them.

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Which science? General science? Biology? Physics? Chem? Earth?

 

general I suppose...too young for any thing else

 

What are you just finishing up?

 

R.E.A.L. science both books (the life science and earth and space)

 

Does it need to be secular (just assuming since you've also picked RSO)?

 

no it doesn't need to be...not at all, but I don't want it to be so seculuar that our Christian beliefs are compromised...I chose R.E.A.L. because we liked how it was outlined, had some writing, but not a lot, had labs and just generally how the information was presented...not too deep, but deep enough to engage the kids.

 

Do you like lots of hands on or want something with mostly reading?

 

a little of both...my 6 year old isn't reading much yet, but I don't want to lose my daughter who is 10 either.

 

Elemental Science, or E=Mc2 might work, or another RSO course or maybe Real Science 4 Kids.

 

If you really want to splurge on physics Super Charged Science is awsome!

 

I;ll check these out...thanks.

 

I think that 10 and 6 are kind of hard to combine, you are going to pick one geared more for the other and work up or down (and usually working down is easier). At least the 8yo will probably fit in ;)

 

I'll keep that in mind...I sort of wondered which way I should go...thanks.

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Our biggest flop was Great Science Adventures. I tried it twice with Astronomy and Geology. The kids all HATED it. Loathed it.

 

So far this year we're doing RS4K Chemistry level 1 for my 5th grader and Pre-Level 1 for my 1st and 3rd graders. They love it. They look forward to it and we've actually gotten to it every week instead of avoiding it because we all hated it.

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I just switched from Exploration Education Intermediate Level which is physical science to Otter's Science which was created by a member here.

http://www.guesthollow.com/homeschool/science/otters_science/otters_science_main.html

 

My frustration with Exploration Education was that I thought it was over the kids heads sometimes and it touched only briefly on some pretty big concepts. (like Newton's laws)

 

This is our first week using Otter's science and so far I'm much happier. The kids are currently really enjoying learning about cells and we will move on to DNA next week.

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My kids enjoy Apologia quite a bit. They all have so much information in them that I gave up supplementing with library books since none of the elementary level books had anything new in them not already covered by the text book. There's lots of great color pictures. The notebooking suggestions can be done or skipped depending on your time or desire to do them. The simple try this activities are fun for the kids. The experiments (1 per chapter) have been a hit or miss with us, though. We ran into some uncooperative weather or results that didn't work out as expected.

 

DS8 requested chemistry and physics this year. DD10 still wanted to do Apologia, so we are doing all three. For chemistry and physics we are using Real Science 4 Kids. The material is written in an easy to understand way. It's real stuff but not as detailed as high school level. My kids aren't having any trouble understanding chemistry (physics will be done after we finish the chemistry book). The experiments are a lot of fun; they kids love them. We don't care for the corresponding language portion and we have enough vocabulary already so we just don't do that part.

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You'll get yays and nays about BFSU, but you could use it to keep your kids together. I know it is marketed for K-2, but people on the yahoo group have used it happily with 12 year olds.

 

Rosie

 

It could be adapted for a ten-year-old. It has higher levels, but I think it would take more time for mom to pull it all together for the eldest. BFSU is coming out with the 3-5 grades, and I know the threads will be revisited, so could be a great way of combining. It should be out some time this Fall.

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You'll get yays and nays about BFSU, but you could use it to keep your kids together. I know it is marketed for K-2, but people on the yahoo group have used it happily with 12 year olds.

 

Rosie

 

what is BFSU...I am sure I have heard of it...I just can't come up with the title....

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I'll second E=mcQ Classical Science. It appeals to kids, has workable projects, and isn't too expensive. He has Life (free btw), and then Earth/Space, Chemistry and Physics.

 

We were trying to "do our own thing" but it just wasn't getting sone. We loved the free Life Science last year, so I went ahead and got Earth/Space to start next week. This is with a 7 yo and a 9 yo.

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I'll second E=mcQ Classical Science. It appeals to kids, has workable projects, and isn't too expensive. He has Life (free btw), and then Earth/Space, Chemistry and Physics.

 

We were trying to "do our own thing" but it just wasn't getting sone. We loved the free Life Science last year, so I went ahead and got Earth/Space to start next week. This is with a 7 yo and a 9 yo.

 

oh...I like this too. Too bad the free one is stuff we just covered...but 2 of them are new information. If you buy one of them...do you get all you need for $50??

 

Kathy

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We are going to try God's Design for Science (in 2011 and beyond), but we haven't actually used it yet (sorry, I know that's not too helpful). Here's a link, though, if you are interested:

 

http://www.answersingenesis.org/PublicStore/product/Gods-Design-for-Science-Complete-Curriculum-Set,6506,153.aspx

 

What we like about the curriculum -- besides the worldview :D -- is that we can choose to do either an entire year-long course in one branch of science, OR we can pick individual "units" and build a year from various branches.

 

 

  1. God's Design for Life (Grades 1-8)

    • Plants
    • Animals
    • Human Body

 

[*]God's Design for Heaven & Earth (Grades 1-8)

 

  • Planet Earth
  • Our Universe
  • Weather & Water

 

[*]God's Design for Chemistry & Ecology (Grades 3-8)

 

  • Properties of Matter
  • Atoms & Molecules
  • Ecosystems

 

[*]God's Design for the Physical World (Grades 3-8)

 

  • Heat & Energy
  • Machines & Motion
  • Inventions & Technology

 

 

 

We also appreciate that the first two courses (Life & Earth) are suitable for students within a 1st-8th grade range, while the next two courses (Chemistry & Physics) are geared to third grade and up. Each lesson has a section for the youngest students, then more challenging material for more advanced learners. It seems like a curriculum that could grow with a family, and be used more than one time through. We also like that we would not be studying one topic (e.g., plants) all year long or animals for three years (like the Apologia sequence). Just our preference. HTH.

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We are going to try God's Design for Science (in 2011 and beyond), but we haven't actually used it yet (sorry, I know that's not too helpful). Here's a link, though, if you are interested:

 

http://www.answersingenesis.org/PublicStore/product/Gods-Design-for-Science-Complete-Curriculum-Set,6506,153.aspx

 

What we like about the curriculum -- besides the worldview :D -- is that we can choose to do either an entire year-long course in one branch of science, OR we can pick individual "units" and build a year from various branches.

 

 

  1. God's Design for Life (Grades 1-8)

     

    • Plants

    • Animals

    • Human Body

 

 

[*]God's Design for Heaven & Earth (Grades 1-8)

 

  • Planet Earth

  • Our Universe

  • Weather & Water

 

 

[*]God's Design for Chemistry & Ecology (Grades 3-8)

 

  • Properties of Matter

  • Atoms & Molecules

  • Ecosystems

 

 

[*]God's Design for the Physical World (Grades 3-8)

 

  • Heat & Energy

  • Machines & Motion

  • Inventions & Technology

 

 

 

 

We also appreciate that the first two courses (Life & Earth) are suitable for students within a 1st-8th grade range, while the next two courses (Chemistry & Physics) are geared to third grade and up. Each lesson has a section for the youngest students, then more challenging material for more advanced learners. It seems like a curriculum that could grow with a family, and be used more than one time through. We also like that we would not be studying one topic (e.g., plants) all year long or animals for three years (like the Apologia sequence). Just our preference. HTH.

 

This is what I'm seriously contemplating starting my Logic child in next year. (he'll be in 5th). He really needs more now, but I'm settling with Encyclopedias and additional readings for now.

 

For grammar stage we are really enjoying Elemental Science. I have my eldest do his own reading though as the reading is too basic for him. I am of the opinion science needn't be "heavy" at this age though. This is the first science that has actually gotten done in our house!! Even the experiments and narration! :D

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oh...I like this too. Too bad the free one is stuff we just covered...but 2 of them are new information. If you buy one of them...do you get all you need for $50??

 

Kathy

 

I got the full student text and the full teacher's guide for the $50. The experiments really do seem to be stuff I have around the house, so far!

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