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SereneHome

Help! Why are those words marked as "adj"??

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My oldest is working on some writing and I told him to use some dictionary apps to find various words.  One of the apps is Merriam Webster, another Dictionary.com.  Both apps keep labeling words like "packed, finished", etc as adjectives.  English is not my native language and I am at a complete loss - how are those not verbs??  What am I missing?

thank you!

 

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37 minutes ago, SereneHome said:

My oldest is working on some writing and I told him to use some dictionary apps to find various words.  One of the apps is Merriam Webster, another Dictionary.com.  Both apps keep labeling words like "packed, finished", etc as adjectives.  English is not my native language and I am at a complete loss - how are those not verbs??  What am I missing?

thank you!

 

Uses such as

"This house has a finished basement"

"This is oil packed tuna"

 

 

Edited by maize
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6 minutes ago, maize said:

This article explains various kinds of verbals--words formed from verbs but functioning as a different part of speech:

https://webapps.towson.edu/ows/verbals.html

The main thing to remember is that parts of speech are all about function, not about the word itself.

oh my goodness, this is so different from my native language

 

thank you

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15 minutes ago, SereneHome said:

oh my goodness, this is so different from my native language

 

thank you

Maybe you have something similar and don't realize it? After all, native speakers don't usually keep a ton of grammar knowledge handy. I remember talking with a russian guy who was like "Well english has cases too" and I'm like WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT??? As a native speaker, I didn't need to think through the language that way to use it accurately. 

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10 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

Maybe you have something similar and don't realize it? After all, native speakers don't usually keep a ton of grammar knowledge handy. I remember talking with a russian guy who was like "Well english has cases too" and I'm like WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT??? As a native speaker, I didn't need to think through the language that way to use it accurately. 

ha ha ha Russian is my native language and I can't think of an instance where the same word would become a different part of speech.....but may be I am wrong, I've been wrong before 🙂

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So many words in the English language can be used as different parts of speech.

If you say "He packed for the trip yesterday," then packed is a verb.

If you say "It was a packed auditorium," then packed is an adjective.

Even the word "homeschooled" is now becoming either.

If you say "She homeschooled her children" then homeschooled is a verb.

If you say "She is a homeschooled student," then homeschooled is an adjective.

 

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You can't necessarily tell what part of speech a word is without seeing it in the context of a sentence.

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7 hours ago, EKS said:

You can't necessarily tell what part of speech a word is without seeing it in the context of a sentence.

Exactly.  English words need to be evaluated in context.  Another example is the word "like."  Like can be used as a verb as in to like something.  But it can also be used as a preposition in terms of comparison.  

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