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Skippy

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About Skippy

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    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

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  1. This American Girl is like so totally tubular! You know, Addy escaped from slavery, and Caroline helped win the war of 1812, but could they reach level 9 in Pac-Man? I don't think so! Duh! Thanks for posting this. My daughter is so excited. (In fact, she probably needs to take a chill pill 😉)
  2. I am far from a Greek scholar. But I found this: "The problem is the rare Greek tense of these verbs. It is the future, periphrastic perfect tense. Without being scholars we can quickly see the problem. The future tense is of course a tense about something that has not happened yet, but will happen in the future. The perfect tense is an act that has been done in the past, but the results continue into the present. The continuing debate is which tense should carry the force of the sentence. The NASB, HCSB, and NET reflect the force of the perfect tense, while the other translations carry the fo
  3. Binding and loosing is not something that was given solely to Peter, but to all those who would follow Christ. "Truly I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall have been bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall have been loosed in heaven. Again I say to you, that if two of you agree on earth about anything that they may ask, it shall be done for them by My Father who is in heaven" Matthew 18:18-19. (The verb tense here is very complicated, but this in the NASB seems to be the most correct translation for the bold, which is also used in Matthew 16.) The ability to bind
  4. Jesus said, "I also say to you that you are Peter (petros, masculine, a small movable rock), and upon this rock (petra, feminine, huge immovable rock or cliff) I will build My church." The church was built on petra and not petros. Christ's church would be built on the foundation of the confession that Peter had just made. Peter had just said, "You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” 1 Corinthians 10:4 - "and all drank the same spiritual drink, for they were drinking from a spiritual rock which followed them; and the rock (Greek, petra) was Christ."
  5. I agree. It definitely was not Peter. [Jhn 20:2 KJV] 2 Then she runneth, and cometh to Simon Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus loved, and saith unto them, They have taken away the Lord out of the sepulchre, and we know not where they have laid him. [Jhn 21:7, 20 KJV] 7 Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved saith unto Peter, It is the Lord. Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord... 20 Then Peter, turning about, seeth the disciple whom Jesus loved following; which also leaned on his breast at supper, and said, Lord, which is he that betrayeth thee?
  6. I also wish there was a more consistent message coming from government officials. But I feel like the government of today is much more involved in these types of crises than in the past. The Spanish Flu of 1918 was worse than what we are dealing with today, and Woodrow Wilson never said a single word about it. I am not actually trying to start an argument because although I think the government is much more involved now, I am frustrated with the response. So, I don't know, maybe less of a response would have even been better than the constant changing of message.
  7. “But the goal of our instruction is love from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith” (1 Timothy 1:5).
  8. I agree with so much of what you have said here. I have been told recently that the solution is that every caring adult should adopt another child. Certainly, this is a great sacrifice to make for a child, but I am not certain that it is always the ideal solution. You said the greatest good would be to help the mothers, and I think I agree with this. I am wondering about the fathers. Where is their role/responsibility in this? So much burden is on the mothers. I want to thank the original poster of this topic. These things have weighed heavily on my mind, and it is helpful to read everyo
  9. "But without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him" (Hebrews 11:6). God rewards those who diligently seek him. Diligently seeking Him comes before the reward. How can we diligently seek Him without free will? Diligently seeking Him is a part of faith, and we cannot please Him without it. "And He has made from one blood every nation of men... so that they should seek the Lord." (Acts 17:26-27). The reason that God made mankind is so that we would seek Him. I am enjoyi
  10. I usually join the letters together when I write a contraction in cursive, but I think it is more correct not to join the letters together because that’s the way I’ve seen it done in cursive writing instruction manuals.
  11. I believe that predestination in the Bible means that God had a predetermined plan to save mankind through the sacrifice of His Son. I don't believe that God has chosen beforehand only a select few who are able to be saved. "Jesus... delivered over to you by the predetermined plan and foreknowledge of God, you nailed to a cross" (Acts 2:22-23). "For [Jesus] was foreknown before the foundation of the world, but has appeared in these last times for the sake of you" (1 Peter 1:20). "God is now declaring to men that all people everywhere should repent" (Acts 17:30). "The Lord i
  12. I grew up in the eighties and was educated in public schools, too. I started out on Judy Blume and Beverly Cleary, but in the fourth grade, my mom insisted that I start reading the classics but not the classics that children usually read. So at that point she had me reading things like To Kill a Mockingbird. Undoubtedly, this was good for my education, but I wasn't really ready for some of the topics, like reading The Good Earth in the fourth grade. Here's a quote from Common Sense Media: "Foot-binding, daughters sold into slavery, women as concubines, and female infanticide by strangling are
  13. Good question. I was taught the we-don't-know-for-sure option. I teach Sunday school, but I teach little kids. So I wouldn't say, "Maybe it was Jesus. Maybe it was an angel. We don't know for sure." This would only confuse them. So I would probably say, "Instead of three men, Nebuchadnezzar [that name is so fun to type] said he saw four men walking in the fire." And I would leave it at that. But if I had older kids, like reading age and up, I would add, "Some people think this may be Jesus, and some think this was an angel. But we don't know for sure."
  14. It doesn't count as a fallacy if you realize that you're being unreasonable. (Just kidding. I just made up that rule 😊.)
  15. Yes, that’s why I said “irrational thoughts.” 😁
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