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FYI: Davidson Academy OHS, free for NV, tuition for OOS (updated tuition info)


Arcadia
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"For the 2017-2018 academic year, the online high school will include courses for incoming freshmen and sophomores. Courses for juniors and seniors will be added in subsequent years. The Davidson Academy National's curriculum is two to three years accelerated and all courses are fully accredited. Applicants must commit to being full-time students.

 

Applicants this first year must be 12 to 15 years old as of Sept. 30, 2017. This requirement will be expanded upward as even more advanced high school courses are added in future years.

 

For Nevada residents, both options – attending either the online or Reno school – are free, and there is no application and assessment fee. However, out-of-state students must pay a $100 application and assessment fee. If accepted, out-of-state students must also pay tuition. "

 

"Application Timeline

 

Application Open - November 15

Application Deadline - March 1

Pending Space Available, Late Application Deadline - April 15"

 

"Tuition

 

All Davidson Academy National students living outside of Nevada must pay tuition. The maximum tuition for full-time attendance is $15,000. Financial assistance for tuition is available to qualifying families. Families of accepted students who wish to have tuition adjusted based on their income levels will be asked to complete an online application for aid and provide their most recent tax returns."

 

http://www.davidsonacademy.unr.edu/Online

 

"Tuition Information - Updated February 2017

 

The Davidson Academy is using a flexible tuition model for online high school students living outside Nevada.This model takes into consideration family annual income, cost of living adjustment based on location of primary residence, the number of dependents in the household, and other relevant factors to determine a tuition level that is affordable for each family. Tuition is capped at $15,000. The flexible tuition model is calculated by completing a FAST application, part of which requires providing recent tax returns. Families who wish to know their tuition amount first, before completing a Davidson Academy Online High School application, may complete the FAST process at any time which is normally a $43 fee. Families can apply through FAST free of charge during the month of February 2017. To obtain a FAST fee waiver, please send an email to applications@davidsonacademy.unr.edu with “Voucher†in the subject line. " http://www.davidsonacademy.unr.edu/Online/Admissions-Process-Tuition

Edited by Arcadia in CA
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(scratching head) Unless one lives in NV, I would think you get more bang for your buck (and possibly more challenge) picking the part time Stanford OHS option and adding AoPS classes or other online/ home brewed classes on the side. OHS math goes much higher and I know their humanities do too.

Edited by quark
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dmmetler,

 

:grouphug: we drove there and back and we are still looking for a social fit for both my kids so I totally get the disappointment.

 

(scratching head) Unless one lives in NV, I would think you get more bang for your buck (and possibly more challenge) picking the part time Stanford OHS option and adding AoPS classes or other online/ home brewed classes on the side.

This news came across my Facebook feed and I was thinking some NV boardies may not be on Facebook. It is another free option for them to consider.

 

I have mixed feelings about the commercialization of DA. Stanford is a private university after all so Stanford OHS doesn't feel weird. I mean if Palo Alto Unified School District offers a paying option for out of district students, I would feel weird too.

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The maximum tuition for full-time attendance is $15,000. Financial assistance for tuition is available to qualifying families.

I am scratching my head too - in many parts of the US, good private high schools can be had for 15K-25K price range and might include things like clubs, extra curricular sports etc etc. How is the online high school offered by DA different from (or better than) Stanford OHS?

ETA: I am only asking wrt non nevada residents.

Edited by mathnerd
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I am scratching my head too - in many parts of the US, good private high schools can be had for 15K-25K price range and might include things like clubs, extra curricular sports etc etc. How is the online high school offered by DA different from (or better than) Stanford OHS?

ETA: I am only asking wrt non nevada residents.

 

If private schools could handle these kids, DA and Stanford OHS may not even exist.  The minimum acceptance criteria for the actual DA is profound giftedness (145+) - the top .0001...  I suspect the online option will be more accepting (it looks like a 9th grader "only" needs a 1460 SAT score, which is still quite high).

 

As to whether online DA will match or top OHS, we will have to wait and see.  Based on the current course offerings, I'd have to venture "no" for now.

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Arcadia, thanks for sharing. I hope my pp did not come across as rude to you. I am genuinely flummoxed. This adds to my suspicion (that has been building for a while now from other online things they/dys have been providing) that while they might get the globally gifted kids, they really don't get the spiky/pointy ones. I wonder who thought this up and if they carefully researched other offerings before hatching this plan. I am happy for the families who feel like they need this. But the fact that it comes from a place that purports to understand PG leaves me with a hollow pain in the stomach. If I was a newbie homeschooler I would be so frustrated right now with how much they don't get my kid and trust me, it has nothing to do with qualifying SAT scores.

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Arcadia, thanks for sharing. I hope my pp did not come across as rude to you.

Nah. Not rude. I can see this new online high school being a viable choice for people staying on the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe or children in Las Vegas since it is free for them.

 

I hope your son gets into his wish list colleges.

 

ETA:

DS11 has qualifying SAT and ACT scores because I looked at the qualifying criteria for fun but he isn't interested in DA so unlikely he would be interested in online.

Edited by Arcadia
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I just looked at the online diploma requirements and course offerings.  For my profoundly gifted son, this would have been woefully inadequate.  12-15 years for 9th grade is a couple of years younger to normal age range for 9th grade and the courses look like the typical high school progression to me.  28 credits for a diploma is not unusual either, particularly for that type of kid and to top it off, 4 of those credits are PE and FineArts/Humanities.  Nothing wrong with those subjects per se but neither PE nor Fine Arts were subjects which our son wished to spend his "academics" time on.  I am not quite sure I understand what spending $15,000 per year would have done for us.

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I think that may be part of it. The answer to a lot of the "we do it this way" questions came down to "meets state requirements" for the physical DA. (I am actually surprised that the online school accepts 12 yr old 9th graders. The physical DA would classify such students as 7th graders because of the Nevada state cutoff, regardless of year in school coming in.) There were a lot of things for DA that rather reminded me of the TTUISD program when I worked there as a grad student, and DAO seems even a closer match.

 

I imagine Stanford has an easier time, since they aren't trying to be a public school and can do things their own way, with the confidence that they have enough name recognition that few colleges are going to question a high school diploma issued by Stanford University.

 

I do wonder if DAO has considered that their all or nothing could really make it untenable for out of state students. In my state, if DD is enrolled full-time in an out of state school, she would not be eligible for the state scholarship for DE at all, nor would she be eligible for the standard state scholarships based on test scores after graduating high school. Since most merit aid given to in state residents is a last money scholarship that builds on the state scholarships, not having that first grant would hurt. The two IRL kids I know who did Stanford OHS both actually were officially part-time, despite taking a full-time load there to get around that, with a high school diploma issued by a local cover school, and a transcript that basically said "see Stanford transcript". Given the schools they got into (Ivy for one, state flagship with big merit grant for the other), I think it worked for them.

 

Overall, I'll give them marks for effort, especially for Nevada families. DA online is almost certainly a better free public school fit than a virtual high school run by a local school district and mostly used for credit recovery (which I know is the case for virtual public options here for 9th-12th grade). But the main benefits of the physical DA program are the cohort of pre-adolescent and adolescent gifted kids and the physical college campus with the opportunities it opened up. For my DD, her primary motivation for applying was dances, parties, and lockers. After the campus visit, her motivations included the UNR wildlife biology student group with the promise of being able to be involved in field work and the makerspace at the Engineering school, both of which she'd been assured she'd have access to since DA students are UNR students as well. The online school provides neither direct set of benefits.

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I haven't heard anything about this in the news. I wonder if it has more to do with state reforms than Davidson?

It appear on the Facebook feed for prospective DA students yesterday but I did not get any mass email from the prospective students mailing list. We went on the school tour last year and I didn't bother to opt out of the mailing lists after the tour. Maybe the mass email will comes later with some info on why the online high school division is created.

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It's been announced as coming for awhile-I know I heard about it last summer, because we discussed it before deciding whether to let DD apply. I do think it was put together with good motives-that there are a lot of people who truly want something like DA, but cannot physically move to Reno, and that they are very close to the maximum capacity of their physical campus now, so have to be very selective even among those families who already live in a reasonable driving distance or who are willing to relocate.

 

And maybe, just maybe, as the DA online program develops, they will be more able to accommodate the "spiky" kids. I hope, anyway. If nothing else, I'd love to see the online assessment be an option for families who are considering the move. When you add the cost of having to do a trip to Reno just for the testing day, that puts a really, really high application cost up front for DA if you live outside of driving distance (even from within Nevada, it would be a pain to have to drive for one day). In my family's case, going to DA so DD could assess ended up taking the place of a fall/winter vacation this year. It would have been nice to have the option for her to do it online, as opposed to having to schedule a trip out there with relatively short notice,

Edited by dmmetler
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Just to throw a spanner in the works; I received an email from DA last year that they no longer need their participants to achieve 145+ but will accept 140+. I have always had my suspicions and hence, never researched it further. But thought I would add in that morsel of juicy information....

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The top schools in my state do have double accel tracks, so to me this is an alternative for those priced out of those districts, or those who couldnt get a seat. The offerings are better than any of the private high schools in that price range within my commute zone...its close to what the Country Day offers, but their price is almost double.

My child took online courses from JHU - CTY, the ability to interact with other students was beneficial. And being online with no bell system etc meant they could interact more than at school physically. Sports were the only other places where he was able to find like minds with time to chat....being rural, online was good and helped him meet students in adjacent counties that he had not met thru music or sports.

 

With public school accepting JHU, I dont think one gives up one's status if one does virtual school. The way the counselor here explained it, a student can take any course that works for him academically, socially, and emotionally whether its at or below his academic best fit. Its fairly standard to hand the gifted the JHU flyer; the stopper has always been cost, internet service, and security of the student owned laptop (there is no security, and mobile internet must be paid for by the family as well as the courses and laptop). Students here also have the option of taking advanced courses online from BOCES, so it is entirely possible to test out of the standard coursework and come up with an appropriate option aside from grade skipping or subject accel. The student still qualifies for the state scholarships based on Regents Exam scores, and has music ensemble and sports with the district. (There are no academic ecs in the district other than drama)

Edited by Heigh Ho
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Single classes are never a problem, even if they add up to an entire course of study, because either the parent or the school is the final teacher of record and is issuing the transcript or diploma. But for whatever reason, my state doesn't give the state scholarship to kids who are registered in out of state schools as full-time students. As soon as someone not in-state is the final teacher of record and is issuing the transcript and diploma, even though the student is still considered a resident for tuition purposes, they are not for scholarship purposes.  So, for us, DAO, since it's all or nothing, would potentially cost a decent sum of money beyond tuition.

 

That may be a non-issue for any other state, but it's something that, honestly, I can't think of a single other online school that doesn't allow part-time enrollment.

 

Another thing that has me a little concerned-do high school students in Nevada have state end of course exams? If so, usually being enrolled full time is what triggers having to take them (this is the case for TTUISD).

 

 

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Wouldnt you just register full time in your zoned district, then provide a laptop while they provide supervised study hall in lieu of the classes that the student tested out of? That is what is done here if a grade skip or early grad is not chosen.

 

Eta: high achieving juniors and seniors already are dual enrolled at their own expense here, as full time college students on the college campus, so there is plenty of precedent for being full time elsewhere than the zoned school, but being able to play sports and participate in NYSSMA events.

Edited by Heigh Ho
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Wouldn't you just register full time in your zoned district, then provide a laptop while they provide supervised study hall in lieu of the classes that the student tested out of? That is what is done here if a grade skip or early grad is not chosen.

I wish we have that choice :( My local public schools have at least a computer lab with a lab tech stationed there for tech support.

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I wish we have that choice :( My local public schools have at least a computer lab with a lab tech stationed there for tech support.

The school here does not allow the use of their computer equipment for outside classes. I didnt go for it because there is no adult assigned to account for the student in the event of a lockdown, fire drill, or early dismissal, and at the time the school safety was poor....disruptors with knives were being allowed to wander and to initiate fights.
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  • 2 months later...

"Tuition Information - Updated February 2017

 

The Davidson Academy is using a flexible tuition model for online high school students living outside Nevada.This model takes into consideration family annual income, cost of living adjustment based on location of primary residence, the number of dependents in the household, and other relevant factors to determine a tuition level that is affordable for each family. Tuition is capped at $15,000. The flexible tuition model is calculated by completing a FAST application, part of which requires providing recent tax returns. Families who wish to know their tuition amount first, before completing a Davidson Academy Online High School application, may complete the FAST process at any time which is normally a $43 fee. Families can apply through FAST free of charge during the month of February 2017. To obtain a FAST fee waiver, please send an email to applications@davidsonacademy.unr.edu with “Voucher†in the subject line.

 

Tuition covers all course materials for students; however, students will need a computer with a web camera and microphone. We highly recommend a desktop or laptop with a robust Internet connection for most coursework, as our live sessions use audio and video streaming."

http://www.davidsonacademy.unr.edu/Online/Admissions-Process-Tuition

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I am scratching my head too - in many parts of the US, good private high schools can be had for 15K-25K price range and might include things like clubs, extra curricular sports etc etc. How is the online high school offered by DA different from (or better than) Stanford OHS?

ETA: I am only asking wrt non nevada residents.

 

I thought Stanford OHS was $35K.   I know the original person to mention it was suggesting part time, but it does seem that DA is offering full-time at half the price.  But maybe they are not comparable?

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I am revealing my ignorance here, but I do not understand what Davidson Online would offer over a college online program. In person, yes. There is a cohort there. There are other kids. Gracious, what Ds woukd not give to be surrounded by other kids who thought as differently as he does. But online?

 

The kid is currently taking online honors high school classes and really digs it. They are string. They hive him outsude interaction. He feels relatively challenged. They are not going to hold him past another year or so (I am already scrambling to find new providers for many subjects as I see him applying himself), but by 14 he could enroll in CC, or PA homeschoolers, or whatnot. Both online providers and CC are cheaper than $15,000.

 

Am I missing something?

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I don't think you are, because we did the same mental weighing-and we were ready to drop everything and move to Reno for the physical DA. The fact is, the academics were the smallest part of what we were considering DA for-online classes and college classes are readily available, and most colleges in my state are less than 15k/yr. And there are multiple online programs that cater to the GT population, either explicitly or implicitly. The benefit was the physical cohort of students of a similar age who had the same sort of thinking processes. And it was that which had DD crying for weeks, and still mopy months later about getting rejected.

 

I understand that they want to serve more kids. I just wish they would work with other states to create other DA campuses at other universities. I'd be willing to pay 15k/yr for a physical DA somewhere in the central US with relatively low housing prices.

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I am revealing my ignorance here, but I do not understand what Davidson Online would offer over a college online program. In person, yes. There is a cohort there. There are other kids. Gracious, what Ds woukd not give to be surrounded by other kids who thought as differently as he does. But online?

 

The kid is currently taking online honors high school classes and really digs it. They are string. They hive him outsude interaction. He feels relatively challenged. They are not going to hold him past another year or so (I am already scrambling to find new providers for many subjects as I see him applying himself), but by 14 he could enroll in CC, or PA homeschoolers, or whatnot. Both online providers and CC are cheaper than $15,000.

 

Am I missing something?

Right, or dual enrollment if available. At around 400$/credit, you could theoretically take a full load and still come out ahead.
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Right, or dual enrollment if available. At around 400$/credit, you could theoretically take a full load and still come out ahead.

DD could get an associates degree for less than one year at DA Online. And that's paying full in-state rack rate.

Edited by dmmetler
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DD could get an associates degree for less than one year at DA Online. And that's paying full in-state rack rate.

 

Out of curiosity, is there any value in getting an associates degree for a gifted child? I can understand essentially a double bachelor's degree--the first degree at a local college is "high school", the second at an Ivy level being "college" but does an associate's degree count for anything for these kids?

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Am I missing something?

 

I don't think you are missing anything.

 

For us, DS would love a same age cohort who thought, behaved, worked and cared as much as he does. Problem is, there is no perfect world or program at the moment like that that we can afford. Even if there was, it really doesn't sound to me like DA's would be that program. Stanford OHS might come close but definitely not DA's.

 

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Out of curiosity, is there any value in getting an associates degree for a gifted child? I can understand essentially a double bachelor's degree--the first degree at a local college is "high school", the second at an Ivy level being "college" but does an associate's degree count for anything for these kids?

 

This might depend on major, college applying to etc. For DS, he could theoretically, petition for an associates. If we had planned things a little more carefully vs letting him pick the classes he did pick due to interest, he could have easily cleared requirements for 2 AS degrees. For his goals though, it probably would not have been very beneficial other than for bragging rights (but for what I don't know :laugh:).

 

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I understand that they want to serve more kids. I just wish they would work with other states to create other DA campuses at other universities. I'd be willing to pay 15k/yr for a physical DA somewhere in the central US with relatively low housing prices.

 

Very good point. Living in CA could be a big factor why I cannot bring myself to consider DA a viable option for us. Something tells me Stanford/ UCs will not be interested in working with DA. State universities like SJSU might though.

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Out of curiosity, is there any value in getting an associates degree for a gifted child? I can understand essentially a double bachelor's degree--the first degree at a local college is "high school", the second at an Ivy level being "college" but does an associate's degree count for anything for these kids?

In our case, it would be to give the "high school" level credential without having to jump the high school hoops and check all the boxes. Right now, the plan is for DD to do the two majors she's interested in at the CC, but to check the boxes for high school at the same time. But, if she decided to just go straight for college, she could apply to be considered matriculated and have that added to her CC transcript and use the state scholarship for finishing her first BS (or first pair of them) and be eligible for financial aid, etc.

 

So far, her college level advisors (outside the CC) are divided between "don't get an AA-it will cost you in merit aid, get the high school diploma, apply as a freshman, and let them figure out what, if any, classes they'll take" and "get the AA, because no one can take away a degree already granted".

 

I figure we have time. She would normally be entering 7th grade next fall based on age in our state :).

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Very good point. Living in CA could be a big factor why I cannot bring myself to consider DA a viable option for us. Something tells me Stanford/ UCs will not be interested in working with DA. State universities like SJSU might though.

I don't think DA yet has the recognition among colleges that, say. Stanford OHS does. Or many East coast (and I assume West coast as well) private and magnet high schools. Part of that is time, and part of that is that a lot of their graduates seem to finish out at UNR (which makes sense financially, and is probably the only way to make sure all credits are accepted), but it does make the idea of paying for the DA name less of a selling point. One reason we were willing to consider moving for DA is that UNR truly does have a really good EECB program that was very receptive to DD, and I can easily see her ending up there at some point.

Edited by dmmetler
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In our case, it would be to give the "high school" level credential without having to jump the high school hoops and check all the boxes. Right now, the plan is for DD to do the two majors she's interested in at the CC, but to check the boxes for high school at the same time. But, if she decided to just go straight for college, she could apply to be considered matriculated and have that added to her CC transcript and use the state scholarship for finishing her first BS (or first pair of them) and be eligible for financial aid, etc.

 

So far, her college level advisors (outside the CC) are divided between "don't get an AA-it will cost you in merit aid, get the high school diploma, apply as a freshman, and let them figure out what, if any, classes they'll take" and "get the AA, because no one can take away a degree already granted".

 

I figure we have time. She would normally be entering 7th grade next fall based on age in our state :).

 

So.......  I feel like I'm about to sound super snobby, but seems to me that a Associates degree is like nothing compared to a Bachelors from an upper-tier college.  And even if your DD didn't get a Bachelor's degree later, she sounds eminently hirable based on her current research experience......    If it would even slightly affect your merit aid, seems like a negative.  

 

But maybe I just don't understand the value of an associate's degree in today's job market.  

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Around here, the AA locks in transferable credits. I can have all but one class finished and in less than five years the credits are worth almost nothing. In many instances, the credits flat out will not transfer without the AA regarless of when they were taken. If they transfer, it is as general electives. So if Ds gets an AA at 16, then first BA at 18, then Ivy league for second BA, he is essentially creating a save point for college. It can then mean his flexibility to step away and do other things without worry of credit loss. For someone so young, that flexibility can be very helpful in the long run.

 

Currently Ds does not have a desire for early college. If anything, he might complete an online degree basically the same way he is doing online classes right now to complete high school. I have about two years of online English left that I can find and then it is going to get dicey. Unless he keeps piling on languages and different various history courses to tread water, we are going to be in the same place with those subjects as well. Having him do an online AA or an online BS with Thomas Edison or Washington Governors means he can at least log transferable credits until he wants to go to university.

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One thing that has me considering going ahead and having DD do the AA is that she has decided she wants to do an eled Math/science degree. (Along with an eventual PhD in Ecology or conservation biology) She wants to do science communication and outreach with kids, like in a zoo or nature center, and having training is helpful there. If she does the AST in ELED, she has something that, even if she never finishes the B. ED, could potentially put her above those with just a bio or zoology degree for such jobs-and that, as EoO states, may be better able to transfer later. Heck, it's likely to be helpful just in getting something like a teen counselor position at the local zoo camp, once she's old enough. I really can't see her teaching in a public school setting, but she likes working with kids and creating materials, and education is one degree where it truly doesn't matter much where you do your undergrad work.

Edited by dmmetler
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Interesting point, EoE.

 

I think it depends on major, and how you plan to pay for school. You could knock out an AA, in some fields, and work to finance the BA -- nursing, for example.

Ds is considering using his nonprofit work to finance spending time abroad. If he gets his AA early, this allows him to work in the industry. It is also somewhere that getting in young has major benefits. You are given leniency of age if you screw up, but developing a reputation is what makes you great.

 

He wants options since he is shooting for Ivy and fancy boarding school. We have talked about how at a certain point it does not matter how fantastic he is, he might not get the luck of the draw to get in. Something might happen between the next 5 years which means it might not be possible. So options are the big safety net here.

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It is also somewhere that getting in young has major benefits. You are given leniency of age if you screw up...

EoO, I am not sure exactly what you mean. Perhaps you have checked out all of this but doing things early has in no way whatsoever given leniency to my DS.

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Hrm....... Do you have to actually tell them?

I am one of those people who won't sleep well at night if I don't disclose info. :)

 

Please research carefully is all I can say. It could become an issue once SSN is requested during registration. Second degrees can also impact finaid. I have not researched details thoroughly.

Edited by quark
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Hrm....... Do you have to actually tell them?

If the application wants all transcripts, won't the college transcripts have the degrees conferred as well? I know mine does when I applied for MBA many years ago and my alma mater sent my transcripts direct to the MBA admissions office. It had the degree conferred for my undergrad and postgrad at the same university.

 

ETA:

I was thinking in terms of DE courses taken while in high school. If my child takes DE classes at SJSU for example and later get his first degree there, won't his SJSU transcript show a degree has been conferred.

Edited by Arcadia
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If the application wants all transcripts, won't the college transcripts have the degrees conferred as well? I know mine does when I applied for MBA many years ago and my alma mater sent my transcripts direct to the MBA admissions office. It had the degree conferred for my undergrad and postgrad at the same university.

I assumed tiuzzol2 was asking about a younger student who say, received first degree around 18yo and wanted to apply for a second degree, not MBA/law school/med school/ grad school.

 

I do know a young lady who received a math degree at 17 then applied for a second degree in business (I think). Not sure how but the college she applied to does award second degrees while some top tiers don't.

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EoO, I am not sure exactly what you mean. Perhaps you have checked out all of this but doing things early has in no way whatsoever given leniency to my DS.

In community organizing, it is very difficult to get going. You are given a lot of leniency when yuo begin because figuring out what works in the individual communities and the individual campaigns is difficult. It is almost as though your first three years you are an intern. You are granted screw up rights because you are normally working with three or more strong activists. They cover your butt. If he were to begin early (he is considering an internship if we do not go abroad), then all that gets figured out early. He looks like an 18 year old jumping right in and having it all figured out. That is extremely rare. So it is not necessarily leniency due to being young chronologically, but more young in the business. There is just a really long lead in with advocacy.

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I assumed tiuzzol2 was asking about a younger student who say, received first degree around 18yo and wanted to apply for a second degree, not MBA/law school/med school/ grad school..

I was thinking of Dual Enrollment credits taken in high school years. Also if a college undergrad application wants all transcripts, I guess that would feel like an omission of a transcript.

 

Out of curiosity I checked the UCs. UCLA, UCSD, UCSC, UC Merced does not accept applications from students seeking second baccalaureate degrees. http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/counselors/transfer/helping-students/second-baccalaureate/

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In community organizing, it is very difficult to get going. You are given a lot of leniency when yuo begin because figuring out what works in the individual communities and the individual campaigns is difficult. It is almost as though your first three years you are an intern. You are granted screw up rights because you are normally working with three or more strong activists. They cover your butt. If he were to begin early (he is considering an internship if we do not go abroad), then all that gets figured out early. He looks like an 18 year old jumping right in and having it all figured out. That is extremely rare. So it is not necessarily leniency due to being young chronologically, but more young in the business. There is just a really long lead in with advocacy.

I know very little about this and glad you guys have it figured out! Good luck to D!

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