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The 6th edition of WRTR came today, and I am glad to report...


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that you still DO NOT NEED the teacher guides. Any place it says that something is in the teacher guide, just ignore it.

 

The only thing you might want in addition to the manual is the Spelling Assessment Manual. If you want to use the McCall-Crabbs books, you can also get answer sheets separately.

 

The leveled readers are also optional; they may be helpful, but they are optional. The manual also includes a list of trade books you can use instead of the readers.

 

The manual is organized differently than previous editions, which will take me some time to get used to, and some things have been renamed (it isn't the Extended Ayres List any longer), and some other very minor things, but I can still say that all you need is the manual and a set of phonogram cards, with possibly the Spelling Assessment Manual, to teach the Spalding Method. Yay.

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While I think you are correct, Ellie, I still maintain that the 4th edition is much easier for a newbie to jump in with. I got them both at the same time. The 6th was very involved and confusing. The 4th seemed very straightforward. After I'd read the 4th once, the 6th made sense to me because I could more easily sift the fluff from the heart of Spalding. But given that this isn't (based on the almost universal experience of people here) the most obvious program to implement, I think the more streamlined 4th edition still should be the top recommendation.

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I don't disagree with you at all. However, it will not always be possible to get the 4th edition. And since some people here have the 6th, I figured I should also have it, as the Resident Spalding Geek. :D I also want to be able to recommend one manual; people shouldn't have to get both, KWIM?

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I don't disagree with you at all. However, it will not always be possible to get the 4th edition. And since some people here have the 6th, I figured I should also have it, as the Resident Spalding Geek. :D I also want to be able to recommend one manual; people shouldn't have to get both, KWIM?

 

 

 

Oh, right. And I truly don't think you need both, Hunter's devotion to the cursive instruction notwithstanding--the 4th is plenty. But the 6th is what most people seem to buy if they don't come here first so I am glad you are able to add your voice of authority to the discussion.

 

ETA: I read both but only use the 4th and I may just go ahead and sell my 6th.

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I'd love to only be able to recommend one volume. I can't do that though. I think few people can use the 6th edition cold without previously having used the 4th.

 

I don't like the changes in Saxon either.

 

It's sad to see beloved curricula leave behind what made them so great, and for the older editions to become difficult to get.

 

I'd like to only be using in print curricula, that I could become proficient at using and then recommend and guide people through. I can't do that though. There are several curricula that are just so much better in the OOP editions.

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I cannot tell, of course, how someone who has never read or studied the fourth edition might or might not be able to teach Spalding with only the sixth edition. I have owned all six editions. :-) However, next week when I'm not swamped with church stuff, I plan to follow my own advice and read the sixth edition cover to cover. Stay tuned. :-)

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I found my 4th Edition on Amazon for about $4.50, shipped. I find myself in the other situation: my son will be attending a charter teaching Spalding, and I guarantee they're using the most up-to-date, so I'll have to buy the 6th. I've had the 6th out from the library twice now, but eventually I'll cave.

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I have only ever seen the 6th edition, and I can say with confidence after reading the manual at LEAST 20 times, I feel I could teach the Spalding method using only the manual and a set of cards. Now if I had only read it 19 times it might be a different story. . .

 

:lol:

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I found my 4th Edition on Amazon for about $4.50, shipped. I find myself in the other situation: my son will be attending a charter teaching Spalding, and I guarantee they're using the most up-to-date, so I'll have to buy the 6th. I've had the 6th out from the library twice now, but eventually I'll cave.

 

My dd is attending a charter that uses Spalding. I don't think they follow it to at but I am debating trying to get a copy and using it. She ahead of what her class is working on and I wanted to work on her with multi syllable words. These accounts of the 6th manual being really confusing and needing to read it over and over and over are not helping at all. I usually don't read books more than once. I can barely find the time to get through a whole book.

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My dd is attending a charter that uses Spalding. I don't think they follow it to at but I am debating trying to get a copy and using it. She ahead of what her class is working on and I wanted to work on her with multi syllable words. These accounts of the 6th manual being really confusing and needing to read it over and over and over are not helping at all. I usually don't read books more than once. I can barely find the time to get through a whole book.

 

 

The method hasn't changed at all so I don't know that you necessarily need the most updated version to follow along with a class. I think all the manuals need to be read at least a few times for someone using it to home educate. I presume your child's teacher has, at least, done the same. But to just follow along with the method you can probably use any edition.

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The method hasn't changed at all so I don't know that you necessarily need the most updated version to follow along with a class. I think all the manuals need to be read at least a few times for someone using it to home educate. I presume your child's teacher has, at least, done the same. But to just follow along with the method you can probably use any edition.

 

:iagree:

 

The method has not changed. The manual has been reorganized. That's it.

 

Remember that a *beginning* Spalding class is about 40 hrs. long. So, yeah, it's going to take some study of the manual--in any form--to get a good handle on it.

 

The Spalding Method is comprehensive and *deep.* It covers all aspects of English literacy skills, not just spelling, or phonics. It's the whole ball of wax, even if you only use it to teach a child to read or to beef up his spelling.

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My dd is attending a charter that uses Spalding. I don't think they follow it to at but I am debating trying to get a copy and using it. She ahead of what her class is working on and I wanted to work on her with multi syllable words. These accounts of the 6th manual being really confusing and needing to read it over and over and over are not helping at all. I usually don't read books more than once. I can barely find the time to get through a whole book.

 

I guess I'm confused, and that's ok, really. If your child is *ahead* of her class, I'm not sure what exactly it is that you need to help her with her at home. :confused1:

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I guess I'm confused, and that's ok, really. If your child is *ahead* of her class, I'm not sure what exactly it is that you need to help her with her at home. :confused1:

 

She is not the top kid in her class. There are kids ahead of her, Since it is kindergarten the skills in her class vary widely. She is the oldest in her class. Her class is still working on pretty simple words that she can do with no issues. She needs some work on multi-syllable words. It has been coming up in books she likes and she doesn't really break them up so she can tackle them. I don't want to wait months before she gets instruction at the level she is working on and needs work on. I have been working on her with reading for a while now. I just meet her where she is at and provide enrichment in different subjects.

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I just got WRTR 6th edition from the library. My intention was to use it with my 5yo DD who is advancing quickly with her reading but will undoubtedly need a phonics based spelling program. By man, after looking through this book I'm just not sure I'm up to the challenge. I'm not sure I have the time to read it 20 times in order to teach it. Can someone point me towards specific chapters to start working through, or do I really need to read this thing cover to cover many many times?

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I just got WRTR 6th edition from the library. My intention was to use it with my 5yo DD who is advancing quickly with her reading but will undoubtedly need a phonics based spelling program. By man, after looking through this book I'm just not sure I'm up to the challenge. I'm not sure I have the time to read it 20 times in order to teach it. Can someone point me towards specific chapters to start working through, or do I really need to read this thing cover to cover many many times?

 

No. You have to read the whole book. Really. If you don't, you'll always be wondering why you're supposed to do *this* instead of *that,* and you'll miss a chart that has information you need to make *this other thing* work properly.

 

Spalding is a wonderful method. You want to read the manual so that you can get the most out of it, so you can teach it the best. And the manual isn't all that big. Sit down with a cup of tea in the evening, and read the book. When you finish it, read it again, and this time take notes and highlight stuff. Read it again, and plan your first step (which will be to begin teaching the single-letter phonograms, but you'll want to know exactly how to do that and why you're doing it that way. Otherwise, you'll do it differently and then you won't get the results you hoped for, and then you'll be saying that Spalding didn't work for you. Ask me how I know this!).

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No. You have to read the whole book. Really. If you don't, you'll always be wondering why you're supposed to do *this* instead of *that,* and you'll miss a chart that has information you need to make *this other thing* work properly.

 

Spalding is a wonderful method. You want to read the manual so that you can get the most out of it, so you can teach it the best. And the manual isn't all that big. Sit down with a cup of tea in the evening, and read the book. When you finish it, read it again, and this time take notes and highlight stuff. Read it again, and plan your first step (which will be to begin teaching the single-letter phonograms, but you'll want to know exactly how to do that and why you're doing it that way. Otherwise, you'll do it differently and then you won't get the results you hoped for, and then you'll be saying that Spalding didn't work for you. Ask me how I know this!).

 

 

Thanks for the encouragement :) I'll give it a shot. I guess what I'm worried is that I'll read the book several times only to discover that it isn't going to be for us. Since she is already well on her way to reading and knows her basic letter sounds, will I know where to start with her? Or will we literally be starting back at the beginning of "learning to read" and taking this "writing" approach? I just wish I knew what to expect :)

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Thanks for the encouragement :) I'll give it a shot. I guess what I'm worried is that I'll read the book several times only to discover that it isn't going to be for us. Since she is already well on her way to reading and knows her basic letter sounds, will I know where to start with her? Or will we literally be starting back at the beginning of "learning to read" and taking this "writing" approach? I just wish I knew what to expect :)

 

 

This is why so many of us like the 4th edition better. It is about a third of the length and really, truly, does have only what you need. It is very doable to read the whole thing several times over the course of a week.

 

The 6th edition has a lot you don't need. I don't know of anyone here who does all of the "integrated language arts instruction". We all just do the spelling lessons (which, as Ellie said, is plenty comprehensive already). But, flipping through my 6th, I think I have to agree with Ellie that you need to read the whole thing.

 

It is a great method, though, once you get it down! I started it with a beginning reader 6yo and a very advanced reader 8yo. For both of them it greatly remediated their handwriting. With a kid who might be a strong speller or who has picked up the early words from reading already, you just move more quickly through the early part of the list. It's a very simple, open and go spelling program once you get it going.

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Thanks for the encouragement :) I'll give it a shot. I guess what I'm worried is that I'll read the book several times only to discover that it isn't going to be for us. Since she is already well on her way to reading and knows her basic letter sounds, will I know where to start with her? Or will we literally be starting back at the beginning of "learning to read" and taking this "writing" approach? I just wish I knew what to expect :)

 

Every person who starts Spalding starts with learning the single-letter phonograms, then the multi-letter phonograms. Older children just learn them more quickly. :-)

 

You'll know what to expect when you open the book and start reading. :D

 

I taught Spalding in a little one-room, multi-grade classroom. The children were 5yo through 16yo. I required all of them to do it. By Christmas, the 5yo was reading (although she had a great advantage, because her mother actually read to her at home; I could tell that none of the other parents read to their children. Seriously. But that's another story, lol.); the second-grader whose parents and first-grade teacher were pretty sure he had a learning disability and who was reading/spelling below grade level when he came to me, was reading close to his grade/age level (he was above grade level by the end of the year); and the other children had improved their spelling levels by at least two grade levels, if not more (and definitely more by the end of the year).

 

To be fair, Spalding was tough with my younger dd at home. She was terribly independent, and there's nothing independent about Spalding. We did it for about six weeks when she was 6, about six weeks when she was 7, about six weeks when she was 8, and about four months when she was 9. I threw in Rod and Staff's "Unit O" (which has been renamed something, I forget what, and is all the phonics stuff separated from its sight-readng-oriented reading stuff, in one workbook), but otherwise Spalding was it. Dd would take her favorite books to her room and puzzle over them. I didn't talk to her about it, I didn't nag her, I didn't try to trick her into reading, lol. When she was about 9½, I noted her taking books out of our library book basket and taking them to her room; one day she said, "There's nothing in there to read! It makes me crazy!" And that summer she read an unabridged Little Women. She went to the little school with me (started when she was 14), and tested post high school in everything except spelling, where she was "only" grade level. :-) The following year she tested post high school across the board. She began taking classes at the community college when she was 14, and graduated with a 3.95 GPA; she was offered valedictorian but turned it down because of the politics involved. When a paper was due in a class, she finished it a week ahead of time; she took meticulous notes in class and rewrote them when she got home, color coding them and organizing them. Any grade less than an A was heartbreaking.

 

I think she did pretty well for a child who didn't read at her age level until she was 9½.

 

If I had it to do over again, I would still do Spalding with her, but I might maker her work harder. ::cheeky mom grin::

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If you get the 4th, the cards are included. Make sure you read about the condition of the book before you buy. I checked a couple of days ago and they were running $6 for a used book, shipped from Amazon.

 

 

If it would come without cards, I believe there is a link somewhere to print out phonogram cards; I'll have to look for it.

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Go ahead and get the sixth edition. I'll help you figure it out. :-) You'll also want the phonogram cards and the Spelling Assessment Manual.

 

Where do you get the cards and Spelling Assessment Manual?

 

ETA: Just checked on Amazon and I CAN get the 4th edition for much cheaper. I think I'm going to go this route just for the sake of saving money :) Ellie, I'll let you know when I get it and have read through it a few times!

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Where do you get the cards and Spelling Assessment Manual?

 

ETA: Just checked on Amazon and I CAN get the 4th edition for much cheaper. I think I'm going to go this route just for the sake of saving money :) Ellie, I'll let you know when I get it and have read through it a few times!

 

 

From Spalding. :-)

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Go ahead and get the sixth edition. I'll help you figure it out. :-) You'll also want the phonogram cards and the Spelling Assessment Manual.

 

 

Can you please help me too? :) I ordered the 6th recently and admit I am a little intimidated...

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Ellie is great with help. We started in January and my son has already progressed and it really gets easier the more into you go. I love having Ellie's responses to help out with questions. I have printed some responses just to remind myself it times of confusion.

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Can you please help me too? :) I ordered the 6th recently and admit I am a little intimidated...

 

I am not Ellie, but we use the 6th edition so I thought I would share something I did that has helped me tremendously. After reading through the manual I went back and flagged the pages we use frequently with those tabs similar to these http://www.officedepot.com/a/products/592408/Avery-Write-On-Tabs-1-34/;jsessionid=0000WKknC9uNHn4SPnWekanyObW:1659q37ia. Here are the sections I have marked: manuscript instruction, marking conventions, cursive instruction, spelling notebook rule pages, recommended books, phonograms, spelling rules, syllable types, spelling notebook sample pages, spelling word list, and spelling scope and sequence. It makes it so much easier to find what I am looking for in the book!

 

Also, when I was just getting started this outline helped me so much http://www.shalomranch.org/notes.html. Obviously the page numbers will be different since this outline goes with the 4th edition but it gave me a great overview of what I was supposed to be doing.

 

I am so glad I put the time in to figure out WRTR- my kids have greatly improved with spelling and sounding out new words. Now that I am comfortable with it, the program really is open and go!

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I am not Ellie, but we use the 6th edition so I thought I would share something I did that has helped me tremendously. After reading through the manual I went back and flagged the pages we use frequently with those tabs similar to these http://www.officedep...yObW:1659q37ia. Here are the sections I have marked: manuscript instruction, marking conventions, cursive instruction, spelling notebook rule pages, recommended books, phonograms, spelling rules, syllable types, spelling notebook sample pages, spelling word list, and spelling scope and sequence. It makes it so much easier to find what I am looking for in the book!

 

Also, when I was just getting started this outline helped me so much http://www.shalomranch.org/notes.html. Obviously the page numbers will be different since this outline goes with the 4th edition but it gave me a great overview of what I was supposed to be doing.

 

I am so glad I put the time in to figure out WRTR- my kids have greatly improved with spelling and sounding out new words. Now that I am comfortable with it, the program really is open and go!

 

Well done.

 

I love Lynn at Shalom Ranch. We are both members of a long-unused Yahoo WRTR group (I'm the owner), and she has posted many times. :-)

 

I love your tabs. I did something similar to my 4th edition. I also cut the spine off and had the book drilled for three holes and put it in a three-ring notebook. Fifth and sixth editions go in two notebooks., one for each part. Even though I'm not actually teaching Spalding, I might also go ahead and put in those tabs. :-)

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I am not Ellie, but we use the 6th edition so I thought I would share something I did that has helped me tremendously. After reading through the manual I went back and flagged the pages we use frequently with those tabs similar to these http://www.officedep...yObW:1659q37ia. Here are the sections I have marked: manuscript instruction, marking conventions, cursive instruction, spelling notebook rule pages, recommended books, phonograms, spelling rules, syllable types, spelling notebook sample pages, spelling word list, and spelling scope and sequence. It makes it so much easier to find what I am looking for in the book!

 

Also, when I was just getting started this outline helped me so much http://www.shalomranch.org/notes.html. Obviously the page numbers will be different since this outline goes with the 4th edition but it gave me a great overview of what I was supposed to be doing.

 

I am so glad I put the time in to figure out WRTR- my kids have greatly improved with spelling and sounding out new words. Now that I am comfortable with it, the program really is open and go!

 

 

Yes, I have tabbed mine as well and it has proven to be helpful.

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Glad to see this thread. I've been thinking about switching to WRTR. We are currently using LOE essentials and foundations. I decided to go with those because I didn't think I had the time to learn the Spaulding method. I just needed something that told me what to do everyday. However since I don't know the philosophy behind the method I think I may be leaving out some very important steps. I've been wondering if reading WRTR would help me implement LOE.

 

Good to know there are those who can help whatever path I choose to take!

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Glad to see this thread. I've been thinking about switching to WRTR. We are currently using LOE essentials and foundations. I decided to go with those because I didn't think I had the time to learn the Spaulding method. I just needed something that told me what to do everyday. However since I don't know the philosophy behind the method I think I may be leaving out some very important steps. I've been wondering if reading WRTR would help me implement LOE.

 

Good to know there are those who can help whatever path I choose to take!

 

 

Well, WRTR is the manual for the Spalding Method (notice how "Spalding" is spelled :001_smile: ), so I don't know how helpful it would be when you're using a different method (albeit one that is clearly a Spalding spin-off). Surely, LOE tells you everything you need to know about in its materials?

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Well, WRTR is the manual for the Spalding Method (notice how "Spalding" is spelled :001_smile: ), so I don't know how helpful it would be when you're using a different method (albeit one that is clearly a Spalding spin-off). Surely, LOE tells you everything you need to know about in its materials?

 

LOL I knew I fudged the spelling of "Spalding" I was just to lazy to go back and fix it. ;)

 

Well, I'm assuming since LOE is based on the Spalding method that reading WRTW would help?

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LOL I knew I fudged the spelling of "Spalding" I was just to lazy to go back and fix it. ;)

 

LOL.

 

Well, I'm assuming since LOE is based on the Spalding method that reading WRTW would help?

 

But see, there's really only one Spalding Method, and the manual is WRTR. Although LOE clearly has Spalding roots, the author has made changes to the Spalding method, so no, I don't think it would be helpful to read WRTR. If you're going to LOE, you should immerse yourself in LOE.

 

Unless I can talk you into Spalding. :laugh:

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Well, I'm assuming since LOE is based on the Spalding method that reading WRTW would help?

 

Okay, I read WRTR many times. I decided to go with LOE and I'm not disappointed. Since I HAD read WRTR before doing LOE I don't know if my prior knowledge helped me or not. I love LOE and will continue with Foundations and Essentials. However, I will always recommend WRTR as the MUCH cheaper method, which if figured out and done well will give as great as results as LOE.

 

Did you study the beginning of Essentials before diving into the lessons? That may help you if you didn't. Also watching the free videos by Denise may also help you.

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LOL.

 

 

 

But see, there's really only one Spalding Method, and the manual is WRTR. Although LOE clearly has Spalding roots, the author has made changes to the Spalding method, so no, I don't think it would be helpful to read WRTR. If you're going to LOE, you should immerse yourself in LOE.

 

Unless I can talk you into Spalding. :laugh:

 

 

I'm really on the fence about WRTR. There are some things I'm not liking about LOE so I'm wondering if the grass is greener...

 

Okay, I read WRTR many times. I decided to go with LOE and I'm not disappointed. Since I HAD read WRTR before doing LOE I don't know if my prior knowledge helped me or not. I love LOE and will continue with Foundations and Essentials. However, I will always recommend WRTR as the MUCH cheaper method, which if figured out and done well will give as great as results as LOE.

 

Did you study the beginning of Essentials before diving into the lessons? That may help you if you didn't. Also watching the free videos by Denise may also help you.

 

 

Yes, I did read the beginning of Essentials, although I should probably go through and read it again since my dc don't seem to be progressing very well. I have watched some of her videos. I'm trying to find the time to watch her training videos.

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I think the advantage of WRTR is that you do HAVE to read the manual a number of times and really think it through. By the time you figure out how to DO the program you understand why you are doing what you are doing because you have been so saturated by it trying to figure it out.

 

The advantage of LOE is that it is all spelled out for you how to do it. There is no confusion about what you are going to do each day. It is very logical and sequential. However, I think because it is so EASY to do, it is also easy to jump into it without fully understanding the methodology or why you are doing what you are doing.

 

Does that make sense?

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I'm really on the fence about WRTR. There are some things I'm not liking about LOE so I'm wondering if the grass is greener...

 

The fence will always be greener, lol.

 

If you already own LOE, then my recommendation is to do everything you can to make it work.

 

I love Spalding (remember: Spalding is the method; WRTR is the manual), but millions of people learn to read and write and spell having never heard of Spalding, so there you go. :D

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I need help. Does the WRTR 6th edition include the phonogram cards or must they be purchased separately? Trying to sort out the options and the phonogram cards are prohibitively expensive at the book resellers (and are all dated 1956?!).

 

I've emailed Spalding directly to see if they ship to Turkey. Most places do not, though, so I'm trying to sort out alternatives.

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I need help. Does the WRTR 6th edition include the phonogram cards or must they be purchased separately? Trying to sort out the options and the phonogram cards are prohibitively expensive at the book resellers (and are all dated 1956?!).

 

I've emailed Spalding directly to see if they ship to Turkey. Most places do not, though, so I'm trying to sort out alternatives.

 

No, the sixth edition does not have the phonograms printed in such a way that you could cut them out and use them. However, you could easily make your own.

 

The phonogram cards from 1956 must be the original first edition cards. You could use them with a slight renumbering, but if they are prohibitively expensive, just make your own.

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