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beaners

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  1. I bow before you. I am in awe. For our family, we seem to have too many things we are juggling to ever have planning work out perfectly. About every 4 months I go over things. I see what we are using that is almost done, and what I want to do next. We had a couple years with a lot of upheaval to our school schedules, so we don't even try to stay on a school year at this point. Different kids finish and start subjects when they complete materials on their own schedule, unless they are combined like in history. Some things are on grade level, some are way ahead, some kids will never even hit kindergarten level mastery. I expect we will have surprises in our year that will throw us off track (3 different hospitalizations last December) so we just keep moving forward when life is calm. I've come to like the way we start new materials all through the year. We are always doing some of the same work so our daily routine and structure are there, but it gives a new change of pace when we finish something. It's much easier than when we used to start the new year with a bunch of new subjects at once.
  2. I completely missed the 100 words part! I would watch things she already knows in English, if that's an option too. Magic school bus rides again is more advanced but hits a lot of elementary science topics. Word party might work well. Llama llama, super wings, these are just the first that pulled up on our Netflix page. If you go on Netflix shows for toddlers and preschoolers there are so many options.
  3. So it sounds like maybe myoclonic seizures? It is likely that the EEG will show abnormal patterns, as mentioned. Seizures can be easy or tough to figure out. One of my kids has extremely abnormal brainwaves. It took 3 overnight stays at a level 4 epilepsy unit to decide that the falling over, shaking episodes were tonic seizures and not syncope or general muscle spasms. Most kids will not be quite that difficult to get a grasp on, but their seizure patterns can also change for better or worse as they get older.
  4. I would focus on the vocabulary you need. Like workbooks mentioned above, we used the académie en ligne site for on grade level materials in French. That helped a lot with those expected school related words, and it was more natural than English resources geared toward learning French. Will you need household vocabulary? Typical kid vocabulary, scientific words, etc? The first 1000 words in French has a lot of little kid words, but not as much vocabulary you will hear if you are watching the news. At that age she might already be past it. For duolingo I will say that their model wastes a lot of time if you don't understand a concept. It's a helpful review if you know how to do it already. Otherwise they expect you to understand a concept by guessing on it over and over until you figure out the pattern, when the pattern is very simple if you explain it first. Their guides available on the browser are somewhat helpful but not well organized. To get the most out of that I would pre-teach and use the duolingo material to reinforce it. As you have noticed, their vocabulary is very limited. I agree with the Netflix recommendation above. They have a ton of options in French. I would do more than a short show. The longer you watch the more your ear picks up, even if you don't know the vocabulary. I don't love screentime, but if this was my goal for the summer we would watch at least a couple hours a day in French and not count it as work.
  5. Why does it have to be fast, within 3 months? Is there a reason for that goal and deadline? How old?
  6. I do not believe that the test standards are steep and that is the reason for the level. Alabama has changed state tests 3 times in the last 3 years, and it's hard to find descriptions. What I can find for the ACT Aspire they did a couple years ago says that the tests have 4 levels. The vast majority of local students are in Level 1, needing support. Levels 3 and 4 (ready and exceeds expectations) are combined to form the number of proficient students. There are a few programs with 100% proficiency within the state, and the state average is around 50% in a state that is known to be near the bottom of the country. This particular district's schools are some of the worst in our state. I mentioned earlier than 1/5 to 1/4 of students are taking APs in these schools, but 0% are passing in the majority of the high schools. It's graduation time, so the schools are posting their valedictorians. You can be the valedictorian of a class with a few hundred kids, and not be able to pass an AP test. These students are being short-changed. They are bright kids with plans for their futures, and they aren't getting what they deserve.
  7. Our local schools have less than 10% of students who are proficient at grade level subjects.
  8. It seems dismissive to suggest that this is just the culture of the area, so get over it. There were 100 other parents at our school's open house this year, and I don't think they were there because they didn't care whether or not their kid received any education. But our single digit proficiency scores speak for themselves. Can't someone be involved in their community and still say they want better for both their own children, and the other children in the community? It seems like that is a greater investment than being content that your own children have the advantage of their parents, so they will be fine in the end.
  9. I'm the worst at judging people. The young couple who has been renting our home for a few years? I got a call from the neighbors that the guy had been charged with a felony for drug trafficking over a year ago, and the only reason anyone found out was because his probation officer went to the wrong house by accident. Everyone thought they were great until then. Took care of the house, no parties, nothing out of the ordinary. They do have a dog and it hasn't caused any damage that was noticeable the last time someone did a walk through of the house. I went back and forth about allowing pets, but that part of things has been fine. I would rather have the dog in the rental than the boyfriend!
  10. Didn't she say that it isn't a phrase she hears in her regional dialect except for these few times? That makes it seem less likely that it is a colloquialism used to make everyone comfortable. We have frequent messages for our one in school that surprise me. "He needs more juices. We teached the alphabets today." There is a strong regional dialect here, but my son is an ESL student and we don't plan to live here forever. I would rather he learn English without the distinct dialect. It is definitely also educational level here though. We think our son's para might be illiterate. It's nothing about anyone's worth as a person, but it does influence whether or not the kids learn what they need to.
  11. I feel like it should be criminal for an entire school system to fail its students on this scale. Our local school is slightly above average for the 7 high schools in the district. They have 1/5 to 1/4 of the students taking AP tests in every school, and only two high schools have anyone who passes. Obviously you can't pass AP tests if you aren't proficient at grade level. Unfortunately there is a lot of complicated history with desegregation, but that doesn't change the fact that generations of kids are coming out of this school system with nothing to show for their time spent there.
  12. 2/3 of the city school students failing in Mississippi sounds like our city schools here in Alabama. Our zoned elementary school has 17% of students proficient in reading. By high school it is down to 11% in reading and 4% in math. They don't hold anyone back for anything here though. You just keep getting promoted to the next grade until you drop out or graduate even though you are still illiterate.
  13. Did you ever have a chance to get him into the doctor before? Or if he is sleeping very soundly can you use the time to make phone calls? My rule of thumb is generally that if I am worried, it is worth getting a professional set of eyes involved. I can't think of more than a couple times that I have regretted it as a waste of time. I can think of more than a couple times that those nagging worries were precursors to serious medical problems that weren't obvious without some testing. Worst case, you will get some peace knowing you have had it looked at.
  14. Alabama has Personal Choices if you are on a waiver. I think several states have similar programs so that you can choose who provides your care, with different restrictions in different places. I want to say ours pays for Medicaid nursing hours only? It's on my to-do list to figure out how it works here, because I know we qualify.
  15. I would get the ball rolling on the SSI now because it is also easiest to do prior to 21 (maybe 22)? We have done it for 4 kids in the past year. Go into the SS office and say you want to apply. You might even be able to do that part online. They can set up a phone interview to get the names of doctors, then they will contact them for medical records to approve you. Stop back into the SS office after it is done to set up payment arrangements, and you're done. With Duchenne's you should have plenty of documentation that will get an approval. We had to do a questionnaire for one of my kids with CP and one needed an actual appointment with their doctors to do IQ testing, but for both of them it was because we had no medical records before their adoptions as teenagers. Even if you don't want to sort through what is available right now for services, getting SSI set up as soon as you can helps maintain access to disability benefits later on. For the OP, we have a lot of teenage and young adult children with moderate to profound disabilities. We have a few local friends, but we have a lot of deep friendships through online communities. I'm talking friends who drive from several states away to help because we have a planned hospital admission this week, a friend who lives in another country who has come to help us during busy times, things I never would have expected anyone to do! But it is not the same as having someone who can duck out and meet me for coffee on the spur of the moment. It does help to have friends who understand things that happen in your life compared to typical kids, even if those friends are online rather than local.
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