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beaners

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About beaners

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    Hive Mind Queen Bee

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  1. I'm the worst at judging people. The young couple who has been renting our home for a few years? I got a call from the neighbors that the guy had been charged with a felony for drug trafficking over a year ago, and the only reason anyone found out was because his probation officer went to the wrong house by accident. Everyone thought they were great until then. Took care of the house, no parties, nothing out of the ordinary. They do have a dog and it hasn't caused any damage that was noticeable the last time someone did a walk through of the house. I went back and forth about allowing pets, but that part of things has been fine. I would rather have the dog in the rental than the boyfriend!
  2. Didn't she say that it isn't a phrase she hears in her regional dialect except for these few times? That makes it seem less likely that it is a colloquialism used to make everyone comfortable. We have frequent messages for our one in school that surprise me. "He needs more juices. We teached the alphabets today." There is a strong regional dialect here, but my son is an ESL student and we don't plan to live here forever. I would rather he learn English without the distinct dialect. It is definitely also educational level here though. We think our son's para might be illiterate. It's nothing about anyone's worth as a person, but it does influence whether or not the kids learn what they need to.
  3. I feel like it should be criminal for an entire school system to fail its students on this scale. Our local school is slightly above average for the 7 high schools in the district. They have 1/5 to 1/4 of the students taking AP tests in every school, and only two high schools have anyone who passes. Obviously you can't pass AP tests if you aren't proficient at grade level. Unfortunately there is a lot of complicated history with desegregation, but that doesn't change the fact that generations of kids are coming out of this school system with nothing to show for their time spent there.
  4. 2/3 of the city school students failing in Mississippi sounds like our city schools here in Alabama. Our zoned elementary school has 17% of students proficient in reading. By high school it is down to 11% in reading and 4% in math. They don't hold anyone back for anything here though. You just keep getting promoted to the next grade until you drop out or graduate even though you are still illiterate.
  5. Did you ever have a chance to get him into the doctor before? Or if he is sleeping very soundly can you use the time to make phone calls? My rule of thumb is generally that if I am worried, it is worth getting a professional set of eyes involved. I can't think of more than a couple times that I have regretted it as a waste of time. I can think of more than a couple times that those nagging worries were precursors to serious medical problems that weren't obvious without some testing. Worst case, you will get some peace knowing you have had it looked at.
  6. Alabama has Personal Choices if you are on a waiver. I think several states have similar programs so that you can choose who provides your care, with different restrictions in different places. I want to say ours pays for Medicaid nursing hours only? It's on my to-do list to figure out how it works here, because I know we qualify.
  7. I would get the ball rolling on the SSI now because it is also easiest to do prior to 21 (maybe 22)? We have done it for 4 kids in the past year. Go into the SS office and say you want to apply. You might even be able to do that part online. They can set up a phone interview to get the names of doctors, then they will contact them for medical records to approve you. Stop back into the SS office after it is done to set up payment arrangements, and you're done. With Duchenne's you should have plenty of documentation that will get an approval. We had to do a questionnaire for one of my kids with CP and one needed an actual appointment with their doctors to do IQ testing, but for both of them it was because we had no medical records before their adoptions as teenagers. Even if you don't want to sort through what is available right now for services, getting SSI set up as soon as you can helps maintain access to disability benefits later on. For the OP, we have a lot of teenage and young adult children with moderate to profound disabilities. We have a few local friends, but we have a lot of deep friendships through online communities. I'm talking friends who drive from several states away to help because we have a planned hospital admission this week, a friend who lives in another country who has come to help us during busy times, things I never would have expected anyone to do! But it is not the same as having someone who can duck out and meet me for coffee on the spur of the moment. It does help to have friends who understand things that happen in your life compared to typical kids, even if those friends are online rather than local.
  8. I can't see the signature from my phone so I'm not sure how many kids or ages that other people are referencing. I agree with the recommendations to get the evaluation so you know what you are working with. Autism sounds like a reasonable assumption but there could easily be additional things going on too. FAS will usually look like a lot of gaps, and sometimes gaining and losing skills without being able to retain them. It also sounds possible. I would not make an idol of what a school would provide in terms of therapy. I have a child with severe autism in a school (our only one not homeschooled, but not because of the autism). After going to a settlement with the district we have a BCBA advising a classroom teacher and aide, but still not actually providing the DTT from our settlement. The special ed teacher had to ask what ABA was. I'm not sure specifically about your province, but my friends throughout Cananda have been complaining about a loss of services for autism. I'm not sure how much would be available even if you weren't rural. The suggestion to place a child who has been adopted with another family isn't appropriate, even if it was only made for emphasis. Start out by figuring out what is going on. Build supports into the environment with schedules, pictures, cues, whatever works. The autism specific methods are good. Floortime is a particular method that is a bit less rigid than some of the others. Approach things at his level for now. If normal reading books is too advanced, what about toddler board books? That sort of thing. Get the evaluation and go from there. One thing we are adding this year is Gemiini for speech and language. We haven't done it yet to be able to make a recommendation, but I have a lot of friends who have had success with it.
  9. The high school biology hits main topics, but a regular textbook includes a lot more material. We use it to reinforce more difficult topics, but I wouldn't use it on its own for that particular course.
  10. One thing we ran into with this was that our rural area had very few providers. That was 5 years ago so things may have changed.
  11. We shop at a restaurant supply cash and carry type place. It cuts our grocery bill in half, if not more. Regular bulk stores like Sam's and Costco are mostly useless for us in terms of price.
  12. I will check out both of those! Thank you! I'm really looking forward to this!
  13. I agree with everyone else that you need better medication management. You can have both attachment issues and other mental health issues. Not everything is RAD of course. I have a son with severe mental health issues but no attachment concerns, and doctors try to label RAD as soon as they see the word adopted. It doesn't fit him. I do see the possibility in things you say here though. You also said that simple things were bringing her close to inpatient level. As much I hate the disruption of inpatient stays, they are a good option to get immediate medication changes put in place and faster access to resources.
  14. We are taking the couple years before high school to do some different topics. I am putting together a linguistics course for my daughter who will be in 7th grade next year. She has enjoyed Great Courses in the past. She has a background of multiple foreign languages, but nothing in linguistics. I'm considering 5 courses related to this that we could use, totalling 130 half hour lectures. The Story of Human Language 36 lectures Language Families of the World 34 lectures Myths, Lies, and Half-Truths of Language Usage 24 lectures Language and Society: What Your Speech Says About You 24 lectures English in America: A Linguistic History 12 lectures This is the order I am tentatively planning to put them in as well as the order of how much reading and output I am expecting. I had originally planned for this to be a half year focus with only the first two courses, but I think there is plenty to make it a full year instead. I do want to leave myself a good stopping point if we decide to move onto something else next spring. Any suggestions for how to use these or other good resources to add in?
  15. Our family called it Pistachio Salad and Green Stuff too, haha! I was always the outcast who couldn't stand it. My husband loves it. Bleh. It's as appealing to me as the aspics my kids wanted to try from our old cookbooks.
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