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Acadie

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About Acadie

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    Hive Mind Worker Bee

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    dd8 and dd12

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  1. That's true. I went back to the original post and realized I'm not sure what general viewing would mean to Seasider since I haven't seen Outlander. I haven't found Wolf Hall to be too graphic, and I do avoid violence in films. It would not be a good choice for family viewing, here, partly because of subject matter and the fact that there's a lot of dialogue, but it meets our adult general viewing standards. YMMV, Seasider!
  2. I'm as jaded as you are, and feel like it would be a waste of time and money to take a test that's not reliable, especially looking at the long game where we may need to be tested again in the future. But if I could find info on sensitivity and specificity I might try it. Both my girls are on the list with their pediatrician whose office has test kits, but they're waiting for guidance from the FDA. The office told us (and I can't vouch for the accuracy of this), the FDA pulled approval on all antibody tests when it became clear so many were unreliable and made all the manufacturers reapply, even the ones that were fairly good. So according to them to the hold up is with the FDA. It wouldn't surprise me if we get a call this week to come in, or if it's another month. My older daughter is also on a list for a study of teens with Covid toes, which would include testing for the virus and for antibodies. The infectious disease specialist said the most reliable antibody test is one from the UK--Roche, maybe?--and they are trying to get access to that one system-wide. Her doctor said they may bank blood samples for the study, so they can run them as a group when tests are available. And just as an interesting aside, she also said Italy and Spain have studied groups of teens with Covid toes, but their antibody tests were so unreliable no conclusions can be drawn from it (I think many teens in those studies were negative for antibodies). The UK has good antibody testing but they haven't tested a group of teens with Covid toes. As Farrar suggests, I'd really like to get the whole family tested, partly so we're less likely to miss it with a false negative, and also because it would have some impact how we proceed with our lives, though we'd still practice social distancing.
  3. In areas with inadequate testing and inadequate contact tracing, which is most of the country, it's impossible to know for sure. But I do think some governors and state health directors are doing their best to gather accurate data and make decisions accordingly. Other governors would rather obstruct the gathering and dissemination of accurate information.
  4. Thanks for mentioning this--I'm in a foul temper today at the state of the world, but this gave me some hope. It's a really interesting look at how Senegal and Ghana have employed various strategies like pool testing, contact tracing and traditional herbal remedies to great success. On Senegal's approach, beginning with preparations in January: "As a result, this nation of 16 million people has had only 30 deaths. Each death has been acknowledged individually by the government, and condolences paid to the family. You can afford to see each death as a person when the numbers are at this level. At every single one of those stages, the UK did the opposite, and is now facing a death toll of more than 35,000." https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/21/africa-coronavirus-successes-innovation-europe-us
  5. I'm totally obsessed with Wolf Hall. If you support PBS you may be able to stream it for free, or it's available to purchase on Amazon. Not sure about anywhere else.
  6. I'm amazed anyone can get antibody testing! We're in a large metro area with two major research hospital systems and have been on waiting lists for a month.
  7. Imperial College estimates current reproduction numbers greater than 1 for 25 states, page 8. And local news reports the greatest percentage of ICU beds in use in my county since the coronavirus outbreak began 😞 https://www.imperial.ac.uk/media/imperial-college/medicine/mrc-gida/2020-05-21-COVID19-Report-23.pdf
  8. Well, shoot. I wonder how reliable their antibody tests are. I hear that there's an antibody test from the UK that is quite good, but many others aren't at all reliable. We have three family members on lists for antibody testing, which is not available in our area. Last word was practitioners have kits but they're waiting for guidance from the FDA.
  9. Interesting article about problems with COVID data reporting in Georgia, including familiar issues like lag time and underresourced public health departments, along with such things as a bar graph where dates were not listed chronologically, but shuffled to show a downward trend in cases. “I have a hard time understanding how this happens without it being deliberate,” said State Rep. Jasmine Clark, D-Lilburn, who received her doctorate in microbiology and molecular genetics at Emory University. “Literally nowhere ever in any type of statistics would that be acceptable.” https://www.ajc.com/news/state--regional-govt--politics/just-cuckoo-state-latest-data-mishap-causes-critics-cry-foul/182PpUvUX9XEF8vO11NVGO/
  10. I'm so sorry, Stacey. Some people really are that awful. Seasider's advice for the legal side sounds solid--go high (with legal documentation) when she goes low. And most of all, may your dh and family eventually find a way to God's peace, which passes all understanding, around the loss of his father.
  11. After we had fleas in one of our cars and my friend's dog got Lyme disease during a winter warm spell, we dose NexGard year round for fleas and ticks. For the car we didn't want chemicals everywhere, including the air vents, so we used a powder you sprinkle on the carpet and vacuumed every couple days. It took a while, hence my desire to stick with oral meds after that.
  12. Starting in June Dd17 was going to be a belayer at a ropes course for summer camps and to babysit for a family with 4 kids. I'm guessing the camps will be cancelled, but she hasn't heard for sure yet. She may still babysit, and I told her we have lots of yard work and home maintenance she could do to earn money for college.
  13. Study of data from Wuhan and Shanghai shows closing schools can reduce peak incidence of coronavirus cases by 40-60%. Children are 3 times less susceptible to infection as adults, BUT they have about 3 times more social contacts than adults when school is in session, which essentially evens out the risk. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/05/04/science.abb8001.full
  14. My 77 year-old aunt was out for her walk the other day in Fort Collins, CO, with her mask on, and came upon a group of protestors. She didn't understand what was happening--she just saw a group of people, and tried to maintain social distance. One of the protestors came over to her and spat in her face. What is wrong with people???? Protest all you want, but to aggressively approach and spit on an older woman who's just walking by? God help us.
  15. When protestors in Ohio target reporters and the home of our public health director, Dr. Amy Acton, Governor Mike DeWine says the buck stops with him-- “I’m the elected official. I’m the one who ran for office. I’m the one who makes the policy decisions. … So when you don’t like the policy, you can demonstrate against me,” DeWine said. DeWine, who has already begun reopening various sectors of the state’s economy, said he respected the protesters’ right to demonstrate but did not see the point of being “obnoxious” toward reporters or going to the health chief’s family home to try to make a statement they could easily make on public grounds. “To bother the family of Dr. Acton, I don’t think that’s fair game,” he said. “I don’t think it’s right. I don’t think it’s necessary to get your point across.” DeWine also questioned why the demonstrators exercising their First Amendment rights would decide to target reporters exercising theirs. The reporters and photographers were “doing nothing more than following that First Amendment, informing the public — and just remember, they’re informing the public about what you think.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/05/05/dewine-ohio-protesters/#comments-wrapper
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