Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Calizzy

Your favorite books/lecture on teaching

Recommended Posts

Hi! I'm sure this has been discussed before but I tried searching and couldn't find any. I'm wanting to do some "professional development" this summer and work on improving my teaching abilities. I feel like I'm a little stuck on teaching like I was taught in the traditional classroom. I'm struggling to think outside the box. This was fine for my oldest dd as she loves school and thrives in all areas of it. My 2nd dd doesn't like school. She has a lot of interests and is good at a lot of things, but anything "school" she bawks at. I'm looking for how to be more outside the box for her, to help her foster a love of learning. Do you have any books or lectures that have helped you grow in this area of your teaching?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My oldest who is fine with traditional instruction is going in to 7th, the next who needs something different is going in to 4th. (And there is a 2nd and preschooler too)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brave Learner, by Bogart

The Well-Trained Mind by Bauer (obviously!)

Why Don't Students Like School? by Willingham - Don't let the sort of lame title throw you off, this is a cog sci look at effective teaching strategies.

The Knowledge Deficit, by ED Hirsch.  I see he has a newer title out:  Why Knowledge Matters, I imagine they cover the same ground.  

Any couple of titles by John Holt.  I'm not an unschooled, but I appreciate his message of taking a child's work seriously.  

How to talk so kids will listen, and listen so kids will talk 

 

These are the main books that have influenced our schooling style.  Many of them propose non-traditional methods for education, though if I had to choose just one, I'd choose Brave Learner for that.  

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone’s suggestions are great. I think this also depends on what your own strengths are as a teacher, and what’s going to make you grow. After all, whatever teaching method you settle on has to suit you, too.

I know a lot of people love Brave Learner for its out-of-the-box style. Julie Bogart is definitely full of good ideas. Personally, I tend to be a little on the loose and disorganized side already, so Brave Learner slightly misses the mark for me.

 I get a lot more out of something like Charlotte Mason, and her many followers, for its emphasis on a sense of order and respect for children as individuals. I also found John Holt (early John Holt) really helpful for its concrete ideas about how kids learn and the ways teachers can facilitate learning.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Little Green Leaves said:

Everyone’s suggestions are great. I think this also depends on what your own strengths are as a teacher, and what’s going to make you grow. After all, whatever teaching method you settle on has to suit you, too.

I know a lot of people love Brave Learner for its out-of-the-box style. Julie Bogart is definitely full of good ideas. Personally, I tend to be a little on the loose and disorganized side already, so Brave Learner slightly misses the mark for me.

 I get a lot more out of something like Charlotte Mason, and her many followers, for its emphasis on a sense of order and respect for children as individuals. I also found John Holt (early John Holt) really helpful for its concrete ideas about how kids learn and the ways teachers can facilitate learning.

 

 

This is spot-on, as the reason I do like Brave Learner is because I tend to be too uptight and controlling, and so her opposite style really forces me to grow as a person!  😀  You are completely right that sometimes the right book is the one that challenges, rather than only affirms you.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have learned a lot from the Jesuit philosophy of education, especially prelection, reflection, active learning, repetition.  

Here are some links: https://www.xavier.edu/mission-identity/programs/documents/Korth-PrecisofIgnatianPedagogy.pdf

Section 13 of this pdf: https://jesuitschoolsnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Foundations.pdf

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many good suggestions upthread. You might also like, if you haven't already read them...

Project-Based Homeschooling: Mentoring Self-Directed Learners by Lori Pickert

Teaching from Rest by Sarah Mackenzie

Building a Better Teacher by Elizabeth Green

The Teaching for Understanding Guide from Project Zero at Harvard

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.amazon.com/Better-Than-School-Declaration-Independence/dp/0943914051/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=better+than+school&qid=1593399707&sr=8-1

https://www.amazon.com/School-Dreams-Making-Grade-American/dp/0151007039/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=whitney+high+school&qid=1593399754&sr=8-1

Anything you can get on Vygotsky. I can't remember what book I read for that. There are some books that merge Vygotsky, Bloom, Piaget. But talk about something that may rock your world (or at least did mine), yeah.

https://www.amazon.com/Mind-Left-Behind-Understanding-Control/dp/0399534555/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3VTTKN2RJMTBS&dchild=1&keywords=no+mind+left+behind&qid=1593400269&sprefix=no+mind+lef%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-1

There are lots more. You can read stuff on ADHD if you want (Hallowell), Alfie Kohn, etc. Basically though, I've always somehow ended up reading things that were just kind of out there to push myself. If you've already read tighter stuff (WTM, etc.) then go the OTHER DIRECTION, kwim? Let the ideas compete in your brain till you look at your dc and things finally make sense. 

Fwiw, my ds has disabilities in every single area basically, so for him school is a constant pain in the butt. We basically don't talk school anymore. We do things because we do them and some things the law requires. So if I can't make them engaging or enjoyable, maybe we don't do them, kwim? Like at some point, "school" as a method of ticking hours isn't necessary and is just a fight. But doing things together because we like doing them, that works. Now he's a really extreme example (ASD2, language issues, high IQ, significant SLDs). But still, it's kind of that other direction, if you're looking for something else. Stop doing SCHOOL and just start living and enjoying things together, kwim? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...