Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Arch at Home

Yield Protection

Recommended Posts

Following the University of Rochester thread has me wondering how does an university know when a student is applying to another institution particularly a safety? Does FASFA, Common App, ACT/SAT, or CCS provide lists to colleges? I would sure like to not to tip our hand this time around if we can help it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best way not to be yield protected is not to be a stealth applicant: visit, interview, submit all optional essays, open and click on the links in all your emails from the school, make personal contact with your regional representative, etc.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best way not to be yield protected is not to be a stealth applicant: visit, interview, submit all optional essays, open and click on the links in all your emails from the school, make personal contact with your regional representative, etc.

 

I get visit, interview, submit all optional essays. We were even at one school told to stay overnight if possible. However, what do you mean by open and click on links in all emails? From this, I assume that they are able to track who is accessing that link.

 

Also, who do you contact if the school does not have a regional representative? We tried to identify a regional administration representative for one institution and was told that the regional reps change yearly and do not get assigned until application reading time. This school does most of its local recruiting through alums and students.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Following the University of Rochester thread has me wondering how does an university know when a student is applying to another institution particularly a safety? Does FASFA, Common App, ACT/SAT, or CCS provide lists to colleges? I would sure like to not to tip our hand this time around if we can help it.

 

Previously, colleges were able to see all the colleges a particular student's FAFSA is sent to, hence the recommendation is to sort those alphabetically and not by preference.

Since 2016/17, colleges are no longer able to access this information.

 

I am not aware that ACT/SAT ever shared this info, nor does the CA.

 

I would imagine colleges recognize that they are the safety when the applicant's stats are clearly above the school's typical applicants and when there is no compelling financial advantage (high stats students applying to their own state's public uni is normal for financial reasons). 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get visit, interview, submit all optional essays. We were even at one school told to stay overnight if possible. However, what do you mean by open and click on links in all emails? From this, I assume that they are able to track who is accessing that link.

 

Also, who do you contact if the school does not have a regional representative? We tried to identify a regional administration representative for one institution and was told that the regional reps change yearly and do not get assigned until application reading time. This school does most of its local recruiting through alums and students.

 

A link can be personalized and thus it can be traceable whether the student opened it or not.

 

You can contact any admissions rep, if there is no regional one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Previously, colleges were able to see all the colleges a particular student's FAFSA is sent to, hence the recommendation is to sort those alphabetically and not by preference.

Since 2016/17, colleges are no longer able to access this information.

 

I am not aware that ACT/SAT ever shared this info, nor does the CA.

 

I would imagine colleges recognize that they are the safety when the applicant's stats are clearly above the school's typical applicants and when there is no compelling financial advantage (high stats students applying to their own state's public uni is normal for financial reasons). 

 

I remember something about the FAFSA no longer providing access to this information.

 

I will have to think about high stats applications. We didn't see this to be the case for DD18. She got accepted at several colleges that she was clearly above in stats and there was no financial advantage. We will have to see how this plays out as my rising senior submits her applications.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember something about the FAFSA no longer providing access to this information.

 

I will have to think about high stats applications. We didn't see this to be the case for DD18. She got accepted at several colleges that she was clearly above in stats and there was no financial advantage. We will have to see how this plays out as my rising senior submits her applications.

 

 

Showing lots of interest is the key, for sure. Being able to demonstrate knowledge of the school in essays will go a long way.

 

In the end there is only so much you can do about perception though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What sort of thing do you discuss or ask when contacting the rep or admissions officer?

 

Do you just introduce yourself, say you are a homeschool applicant, ask if there is any special addiitional requirements for homeschoolers, etc? Or ask more specific questions about the intended major?

Edited by omd21

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not so easy to show interest for some of us. My friend’s DD couldn’t do any visits for schools on the East Coast due to financial reasons. It had nothing to do with lack of interest.

As far as contacting a representative, what would you ask?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dd visited all but one of the schools she applied to, did interviews at all (some via phone, some on campus, and some locally with alumni), and reached out to the admissions counselors. Her question was mostly about how they would view her reported GPA (dd's high school sent a weighted GPA). Some schools said they would use what was reported; some said they would unweigh and then reweigh according to their own system. Your child could also reach out to a department head to ask questions about a specific major. You could also send an email to admissions stating how you are very interested in the school but unable to visit due to distance/money and to please make a note in their file communicating that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son applied to a school several states away from our home that was well below his stats. This college found out that he was looking at other schools by asking what other colleges he was visiting on his college tour.

 

While the school accepted him, they took an interesting approach -- they told him at his college visit / interview that if he didn't get awarded any merit aid, he should contact the admissions office since his not receiving any merit aid would have been a mistake on their part. He wasn't offered any merit aid and he didn't contact them since by that point he had other offers he preferred.

 

Since he wasn't accepted, this approach didn't affect their yield, but it did save them offering merit aid to someone who they felt wouldn't come anyway. (And presumably if he had really pursued this college he might have been able to negotiate a good merit aid package -- had had multiple full-ride offers from higher-tier colleges).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While the school accepted him, they took an interesting approach -- they told him at his college visit / interview that if he didn't get awarded any merit aid, he should contact the admissions office since his not receiving any merit aid would have been a mistake on their part. He wasn't offered any merit aid and he didn't contact them since by that point he had other offers he preferred.

 

Since he wasn't accepted, this approach didn't affect their yield, but it did save them offering merit aid to someone who they felt wouldn't come anyway. 

 

Now I am confused.

You said the school accepted him, and in the next paragraph that it didn't.

???

 

If he was accepted and declined, the approach did affect the college's yield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not so easy to show interest for some of us. My friend’s DD couldn’t do any visits for schools on the East Coast due to financial reasons. It had nothing to do with lack of interest.

As far as contacting a representative, what would you ask?

look up contacts and have the student send some good questions via email - cheap and easy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not so easy to show interest for some of us. My friend’s DD couldn’t do any visits for schools on the East Coast due to financial reasons. It had nothing to do with lack of interest.

As far as contacting a representative, what would you ask?

 

Things that are not obviously answered on the college's website.

you could ask to be directed to the person who can answer questions for a particular department

 

Some things our visiting prospective students ask about:

undergraduate research, double major, study abroad, course availability (wait lists? doable in 4 years?), class sizes, online vs in seat, taught by TAs or professors

is it advisable to accept AP/DE credit or should one retake the course at the college

how does college work with student athletes

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not so easy to show interest for some of us. My friend’s DD couldn’t do any visits for schools on the East Coast due to financial reasons. It had nothing to do with lack of interest.

As far as contacting a representative, what would you ask?

 

We are in an exceptionally geographically distant state, so visiting early on was mostly a no-go for us as well. There are a number of things one can do to show interest without visiting. Applying early is a big one. Becoming very familiar with the school and its programs via the website, and perhaps following their social media accounts. Demonstrate that knowledge in application essays, being clear on why the student wants to attend that school. Clicking on links in e mails they send, and corresponding with school reps can help. If there are any local meet and greets, or if they will have a table at a local college fair, attend and make sure to record that attendance somehow. After applying, set up the online portal if that option is offered, and check it frequently. Apply for any applicable competitive scholarships offered by the school.

 

Use discretion when naming other schools of interest, particularly if one is a high stats student, if asked for that information. Limit names to schools that would not be perceived as being superior to the school.

Edited by GoodGrief

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of colleges do "XYZ University in Your Area!" presentations. You can get on their mailing list, ask admissions, or check their website. If you agree to release your info for ACT or SAT, you may get invitations that way. Oldest dd got a few like that. At least two of them were groups of more selective schools doing it together, maybe four schools or so? Some of the schools that did this in our area: Vanderbilt, Rice, Notre Dame, University of Georgia, Northwestern, Dartmouth, Princeton. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...