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How do I go about choosing a Latin program?


abrightmom
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I've studied and read extensively about most, if not all, Latin programs. I have NO experience with Latin in my own pathetic, piddly education.

 

What do I do to narrow down the options and discover the right choice for my family? What questions should I be asking? I need to make a grid for filtering so that I can rule out or rule in for the RIGHT reasons, not just what "looks easy" or "sounds fun".

 

:o

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A couple things that come to mind...

 

1. What age child(ren) will you be teaching? (In your case, which of your kiddos?)

 

2. Do you want Christian content or secular?

 

3. How long do you think you'll want to teach Latin? A year or two for exposure, or all the way through? Not that you necessarily know this right now, and it's not the most important question... but if something only has two levels and you know you want to teach for several years, you might move that one down the list, KWIM??

 

I see you're using Memoria Press for something already... have you looked at Prima Latina? We're using it and moving to Latina Christiana next year, which I've heard is very good.

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I agree with PP that you should start by deciding what you want to accomplish and which ages of kids. Do you want your kids translating Ovid by 12yo, are you prepping for other foreign language down the line or latin roots, or is it more about exposure and fun at this point?

 

If your kids like musci and/or coloring, I'd start with Sing Song Latin as a gentle intro. It's inexpensive ($20 which includes a CD), has both classical/eccl pronunciations, and you can download free 100+ page coloring books to go with it (a page for every vocab word or phrase). If your kids hate silly songs and coloring, or listening to stories like "the 3 little pigs" partially translated into latin, skip it!

 

If you want something straight-forward, easy, yet still fun, I'd try Getting Started with Latin (also $20, with free downloadable mp3s of lessons and pronunciations on the website). It also has both types of pronunciations to choose from, lessons are simple and quick (one page with plenty of white space, basically a rule/idea and 5-10 slightly-silly latin sentences to translate like, "We are not able to conquer the islands without many boats." You can also do GSWL after SSL (that's what we did).

 

Neither SSL and GSWL require you to have any prior latin knowledge and are very easy to teach. Both are nice, gentle, inexpensive ways to add latin to your lessons, and will help set you up for more serious latin studies.

Edited by ChandlerMom
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Latin Prep from Galore Park isn't listed either. I never studied Latin myself. I purchased and tried most of the more popular Latin programs available and I did not like any of them for various reasons (I'd be happy to share those with you if you pm me). I ended up trying Latin Prep and I've been very happy with it. We've found a Latin curriculum that meets our standards and is easy for me to understand and teach.

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:001_smile: Thanks for listing the questions I should be asking. I will ponder those and see if I can rule any of the options in or out. I do know that I'd like to stay the course with Latin for several years. Now, whether or not this ends up being doable for me is something I'm carefully considering.

 

I was encouraged to hear SWB say that she didn't begin her Latin studies until she was 10. :D

 

I am going to look at Galore Park as well. :001_smile:

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Hehe, I stumbled across this when I was researching latin programs last year... Maybe it will be helpful to you. Comparison of Introductory Latin Programs

Heather

 

Thanks for this link! We plan to begin with SSL next year, then go to something more in depth. Memoria Press also has several articles on when to begin latin and what program to begin with,

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A couple things that come to mind...

 

1. What age child(ren) will you be teaching? (In your case, which of your kiddos?)

 

2. Do you want Christian content or secular?

 

3. How long do you think you'll want to teach Latin? A year or two for exposure, or all the way through? Not that you necessarily know this right now, and it's not the most important question... but if something only has two levels and you know you want to teach for several years, you might move that one down the list, KWIM??

 

:iagree: Also, do you want to go the "grammar/vocab first" route, or the "immersion in reading first" route?

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:iagree: Also, do you want to go the "grammar/vocab first" route, or the "immersion in reading first" route?

 

Ack! I don't know...... How could I know?!

 

I am only interested in beginning Latin with my rising 4th grader who will be 10 this fall. My younger guy isn't ready for the addition of Latin and I'm not interested in doing Latin for fun (i.e. SSL) because I don't have time!

 

I prefer Christian content.

 

I am drawn to Memoria Press (sans DVDs) because it seems streamlined and there's a nice sequence to follow. I think Prima Latina might be too boring for us though I'm really not sure. Can we begin with LCI in 4th grade?

 

Latin for Children looks more fun and the DVDs seem more interesting. My boys would dig Headventureland and all of the colorful books and supplements. I think there's a motivation with all of that. Also, LFC has 3 years and then there is Latin Alive. That gives us a long sequence to follow at our pace.

 

Another thing I don't know is if it would be better to ask one of my kids to wait so I can combine at least two of them. I think starting my oldest on his own might prove worthwhile because we can "test" Latin out and I can join him in studying. Then, I'm through a learning curve and can more easily teach my youngers. Also, if a program bombs we've wasted less $ on one student....

 

The programs that hold promise for me include:

 

Memoria Press (but is it boring?!)

Latin for Children (expensive; looks fun but looks aren't everything)

Visual Latin (appealing with the format; cost effective; any cons here?)

Lively Latin looks good but I don't want superfluous history

 

So, what is the approach for each of those (grammar/vocab vs immersion in reading)? And how do I know what I want? :D:D

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Like most of my curriculum decisions, I have opted to follow WTM's suggestions. We started with Prima Latina and are now on to Latina Christiana from Memoria Press. I never really doubted that this would be good since it was suggested by Susan and Jesse.

 

It's not boring. Prima Latina is basically vocabulary and learning prayers. Latina Christiana uses some of the Prima Latina vocab but gets into verb conjugation and noun declension. I had no Latin experience and am learning along with my DS9. It's not too hard and it's not boring, and some weeks he says Latin is his favorite subject. There's lots of repitition and he's learning lots of derivatives (like pugnacious), which is very cool! I tell you, though, at Church when we say the Sanctus (we're Episcopalian), I sometimes say it in Latin on accident. :) I feel very confident this program is giving him (us) a firm foundation in Latin fundamentals and will make learning Spanish easier when that time comes.

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Memoria Press and Latin for Children both have a grammar/vocab approach to Latin. I'm not familiar with the other two.

 

I'll second a vote for Memoria Press - Prima Latina and Latina Christiana. You absolutely could start LC without having done PL, but we haven't found PL boring either. I'm using it with my 9 year old son and we both are learning a lot. We have the set with the teacher guide, student book, and pronunciation CD, and it's been just right.

 

We will probably continue with Latina Christiana... although I confess Latin for children looks interesting as well, and if for some reason we switch, it would probably be to that. No plans at the moment, though.

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I think part of it might have to do with how your child learns best as well. My oldest has done Prima, LCI and is now on First Form with Second Form on the table for next year. I wanted him to have at least 2 years of Latin, but he loves it so I'm going to let him do it as long as he wants. He is a booky kid and learns well with the structured grammar learning in Memoria Press stuff. He is good at English grammar which helps.

 

I have Spanish for Children and if I had seen that would have been a good choice for Latin as well. It's very grammar based, quite similar to MP stuff.

 

Now, my dd9 did Prima last year and LC1 this year. She's doing well, but the declensions are harder for her. I'm considering changing things up for her next year and going with a different approach as I don't see First Form really fitting her.

 

So... along with what is easy for you to teach, I'd also consider a bit how your child learns best. I'm going to have to look at Latin threads to figure out if I should switch dd next year so I'm kind of in the same boat!

 

Also... the LC1 DVD's are dreadful, but my ds is enjoying the First Form DVD's this year. He's now surpassed me in Latin so the DVDs are a must here. I did try the LC1 DVD with my dd this year and she hated Latin while using them and could not pick up the declensions. As soon as I stopped making her watch the DVD and taught her myself she started loving Latin and learned her declensions in a couple weeks.

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Another Memoria Press recommendation here. My oldest started LCI in 3rd grade, followed by LCII, and then 2 years with the MP guides to Henle (this was before First Form Latin was published). Beginning in 7th grade she took high school Latin I at our state's virtual school, followed by Latin II. So by 9th grade she had her foreign language credit taken care of. I wanted her to follow up with Latin III, but she was done and wanted to move on to Spanish.

 

I had absolutely no Latin background when we started. The fun years with Latina Christiana made the high school Latin courses a breeze for her and I'm glad we did them.

 

My younger children are now in 3rd and 5th grades, and we are finishing up Prima Latina this year. It is gentler than LCI in that it is more about vocab, grammar, and prayer memorization. I did not use this program with my daughter but am glad that I have started at this point with my sons. I gives them a great start and I know they will be ready for LCI next year. Not sure how far they will go with Latin, but my plan is to do LCI and then First Form at least.

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Ack! I don't know...... How could I know?!

 

...Can we begin with LCI in 4th grade?

 

Yes.

 

The programs that hold promise for me include:

 

Memoria Press (but is it boring?!)

Latin for Children (expensive; looks fun but looks aren't everything)

Visual Latin (appealing with the format; cost effective; any cons here?)

Lively Latin looks good but I don't want superfluous history

 

So, what is the approach for each of those (grammar/vocab vs immersion in reading)? And how do I know what I want? :D:D

 

I only know MP's PL/LCI/LCII sequence, and its approach is of grammar/vocab. It progresses on to Henle (or maybe you can enter First or Second Form afterwards, I'm not sure), and Henle is definitely grammar/vocab oriented. You can do a search on the boards for Henle, and read more about it. It prepares you for reading original Latin texts.

 

Whereas I suspect that reading-based programs (esp. in younger years) give you modern lit. written in Latin.

 

How will you decide? You'll need to think about that! :D Why do you want your kids to study Latin? Where do you hope they will end up? Reading original Latin texts? Learning English grammar better - yes, Latin will definitely help with this? Just having some fun with an extra-curricular dip into books written in Latin? An English vocab roots study? If you can come up with some answers to some of these, you'll be better able to evaluate what types of programs to look for.

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Colleen,

 

Thanks for linking me to that thread. It is a gem.:001_smile:

 

My primary reason is #2 but I could see the reading of original texts becoming important to us down the road.

 

I definitely want to learn Latin with my kids.

 

I am leaning heavily toward Latina Christiana 1 with my rising 4th grader. No DVDs though unless someone says they are worthwhile. I've read too many negatives about them and they are a lot of extra $ I'd rather put toward something else. :001_smile:

 

If reson #2 is my main reason then is LC 1 a good choice? I think it is but I'm not positive. I am also, admittedly, drawn to Visual Latin for his DVDs which look great. Can we use both MPs Latin and Visual Latin? May need to ask around or just try.

 

We are getting there! :001_smile:

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For the OP and the ages of her kids....

 

We LOVE "I SPEAK LATIN" and "Getting Started with Latin" combined.

 

My kids started out with Latin with Children with moans and groans.

So I switched to I Speak Latin and Getting Started with Latin. They love Latin now and think it is a secret fun language to learn. It is not intense Latin but they are getting some kind of exposure to begin such that when you get to the harder stuff it doesn;t freak me or them out (and yes I did study Latin for two years in Junior High and did well and even I freaked out with more of the intense curriculum).

 

What I am going to use next year....I have no idea but probably go back to Latin with Children unless I come up with something better.

 

PS I have a friend of mine who went to med school and is a Chiropractor now who took Latin through High School. He loved it but wishes he learned a modern foreign language as well.

Edited by happycc
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If reson #2 is my main reason then is LC 1 a good choice?

 

Yes. :D LCI is grammar/vocab based.

 

And now that I closely reread my OP on that thread, I realize that reason #2 can still lead to reason #1, because learning via the grammar/vocab approach can help lead to reading Latin *fluently* as opposed to just dipping in to Latin books here and there for fun.

 

To add fun to LCI (which does have prayers/songs to memorize for fun), you can always buy some simple Latin readers. I have a poetry book I found on amazon, and I believe there are Dr. Seuss books written in Latin. I've also seen some simple readers by Bolchazy Carducci (sp?).

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Have you read this article, about setting realistic Latin goals?

 

http://www.asliceofhomeschoolpie.com/2011/07/articles.html

I read it last night Hunter. Thanks! It gave me some great food for thought. :001_smile:

For the OP and the ages of her kids....

 

We LOVE "I SPEAK LATIN" and "Getting Started with Latin" combined.

 

 

ISL looks like fun! I am intrigued by his use of TPR (Total Physical Response).

 

Yes. :D LCI is grammar/vocab based.

 

And now that I closely reread my OP on that thread, I realize that reason #2 can still lead to reason #1, because learning via the grammar/vocab approach can help lead to reading Latin *fluently* as opposed to just dipping in to Latin books here and there for fun.

 

To add fun to LCI (which does have prayers/songs to memorize for fun), you can always buy some simple Latin readers. I have a poetry book I found on amazon, and I believe there are Dr. Seuss books written in Latin. I've also seen some simple readers by Bolchazy Carducci (sp?).

 

Thanks for the encouragement to add simple Latin Readers. I have seen them around; perhaps on Veritas Press' website.

 

We're just finishing up Prima Latina and I loved the DVDs. It was something I could have my 3rd grader do independently while I worked one-on-one with my 1st grader. I plan to continue him with Latina Christiana next fall.

 

I am happy to hear a positive report on the DVDs. I really want to study with my son so I'm tempted to hit the books sans DVDs. However, Visual Latin has my eye alongside Latina Christiana and we'd be watching a teacher on-line :D.

 

Thanks for all of the help. I have most definitely sifted and narrowed the options. :001_smile: Yahoo!

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If anyone decides to take Latin super serious, realize it's going to take a LOT of books, resources, money and time. What do you spend on English? And students have so many opportunities to "unschool" English.

 

So IF you decide to go all out, you will need reading, writing, spelling, grammar, listening, speaking, etc., at the very least.

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On "reading" vs. "grammar-translation" programs: a g-t program sets forth the grammar explicitly, usually right in the student text, before the students meet the new grammar principles in new translation. A reading program presents a reading with new grammar elements first, and guides the child through observation and inference into learning about the new grammar. Proponents of the reading method say it's more natural, more like how we learned our own language originally. Proponents of g-t say that it's clear and orderly and makes sense to children and parents, and is especially useful if parents have no Latin background.

 

There are threads here on which programs are of which type . . .

 

Other questions to ask:

 

--do you care which pronunciation system you'll be learning?

 

--what kind of a vocabulary world do you want your child immersed in? (not just secular vs. religious, but "child" vs. "military" vs. "Roman literary")

 

--how much translation do you want to do, and how soon? (some programs tilt more towards covering forms and vocabulary extensively before beginning translation; others weave translation in sooner)

 

--do you want to translate only from Latin to English, or do you also want to translate English to Latin?

 

--do you want derivative work included, or are you happy doing a separate derivatives program?

 

--do you want the program to teach all needed English grammar, or are you happy dipping into a separate English program, and if so, is there one you are committed to already?

 

--what extras are indispensible to you? (some people want a DVD no matter what, because their children like them; others only want a DVD if the program is incomplete without one)

 

--format: do you like texts or workbooks? tear out or looseleaf?

 

Even within a given category (g-t or reading), these other questions are good to ask and answer--there's a lot of variation among curricula on these fronts.

 

Enjoy!

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Abrightmom, I did a LOT of foreign language study with my boys, who are both now grown. I've got some serious memory loss and brain damage issues that are making it impossible for me to pick up where I left off or instantly remember even exactly what we did. But...

 

I found that we always did better with a boring grammar based mastery based program as our spine. When it came to ancient inflected languages, preferably we used one with reduced vocabulary, so we could concentrate on the intense grammar requirements.

 

Reading curriculums were best used as supplementary readers. I usually just bought old beat up student books and no TMs.

 

TPR was hard to teach unless I was far ahead of the student.

 

For reading level goals, if you do think you want to stretch for a student to be able to read actual books in Latin and Greek, the Loeb Classics are a reachable goal, as the student can read as much of the English page as necessary. These books give children a goal to work towards. My youngest son LOVED these books.

 

Also there are interlinears, which are even easier. I know there are ones for the Bible and Caesar's Gallic War. I think maybe of the Aeneid. If you find an interlinear you really like. You could make your goal be that book.

 

I learned not to be talked into teaching a language I didn't want to teach. I ended out making them finish learning Japanese on their own. I learned not to try and teach 2 languages at a time. One wanted French and one wanted Spanish. Other times I was trying to juggle Latin, Greek and Hebrew along with High school math and science. Dumb! No wonder my brain is toast now, never mind the seizures :-)

Edited by Hunter
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Katharine and Hunter,

 

Thanks to you both for input.

 

Whew, this is a difficult topic to grapple with. I don't want to choose blindly but I do think that's what I'm doing. I have NO experience with Latin so I have nothing to draw from when it comes to goals. Latin makes the most sense to me as a choice for a foreign language (perhaps Greek is up there with Latin).

 

Katharine, you have asked a LOT of questions. Ack! I don't know how to answer many of them. A few years ago I thought that Latin for Children would be for us because it looks FUN :D. Now I know there is more to the decision than the fun factor.

 

Pronunciation: Classical was my first choice but now I'm not sure it matters.

Vocabulary World: I am embarrassed to admit that I don't understand "child" vs "military" vs "Roman literary". Is this referring to the type of vocabulary that a Latin program focuses on?

Translation: I have no idea here. How much and when? Latin to English, English to Latin? I don't know yet and I don't know how to know. :confused:

Derivative work: I'd love for this to be part of our Latin studies.

English grammar: We are studying with First Language Lessons and Rod & Staff Grammar. I intend to stay the course with formal English grammar.

Indispensable Extras: I'm not sure. I think we'd actually like a DVD component if it is well done. But, I'm also drawn to a simpler, less expensive program if it is easy to understand and teach. Nothing indispensable at this time. EASE OF USE is at the top of my list if that fits here :001_smile:.

Texts or Workbooks/Tear Out or Looseleaf:I like texts and workbooks. I like bound workbooks versus putting papers into a 3-ring binder. The fewer materials to juggle the better.

 

So, what is your diagnosis??? :D

 

I'm more than happy to wait another year to begin Latin with my oldest. He's a rising 4th grader, turning 10 this fall. He'll be an 11-year-old 5th grader in 1.5 years. I don't relish the idea of dragging out something that will be more accessible a bit later on. I'd rather give the time to literature and composition. However, Latin will need to begin sooner or later and the time requirements for the other subjects remain.

 

What is the advantage to starting early (2nd or 3rd grade) versus later (5th grade)?

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Abrightmom, I did a LOT of foreign language study with my boys, who are both now grown. I've got some serious memory loss and brain damage issues that are making it impossible for me to pick up where I left off or instantly remember even exactly what we did. But...

 

I found that we always did better with a boring grammar based mastery based program as our spine. When it came to ancient inflected languages, preferably we used one with reduced vocabulary, so we could concentrate on the intense grammar requirements.

 

Reading curriculums were best used as supplementary readers. I usually just bought old beat up student books and no TMs.

 

TPR was hard to teach unless I was far ahead of the student.

 

For reading level goals, if you do think you want to stretch for a student to be able to read actual books in Latin and Greek, the Loeb Classics are a reachable goal, as the student can read as much of the English page as necessary. These books give children a goal to work towards. My youngest son LOVED these books.

 

Also there are interlinears, which are even easier. I know there are ones for the Bible and Caesar's Gallic War. I think maybe of the Aeneid. If you find an interlinear you really like. You could make your goal be that book.

 

I learned not to be talked into teaching a language I didn't want to teach. I ended out making them finish learning Japanese on their own. I learned not to try and teach 2 languages at a time. One wanted French and one wanted Spanish. Other times I was trying to juggle Latin, Greek and Hebrew along with High school math and science. Dumb! No wonder my brain is toast now, never mind the seizures :-)

Hunter,

 

These are wonderful thoughts and ideas. I think that reading the Bible (the Vulgate) would be thrilling! That is a compelling reason to learn Koine Greek. Reading God's Word in the original..... gives me goosebumps. However, we are not yet ready to tackle Greek. I HOPE that my children will want to study Greek and that we can attempt that study sometime in the logic stage. They will really have to want to drive that ship though.....

 

I don't have any reading goals as of yet (other than the Bible) but I will look at those Loeb classics as I continue to ponder the the questions in this thread.

 

My entire homeschool has been in an uproar this year. I lack wisdom.... time to read & apply James and perhaps Ecclesiastes. I get caught up in the hoopla on the forum and forget that I am supposed to be grounded in God's Word.

 

Thanks ladies. You've given me so much time and attention. I'm very grateful.

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Hello again!

 

I can't diagnose, but here's a little more help . . . you'll find that if you can arrive at a pronunciation preference, it will help you narrow down your options, which might be nice for you. There are some links down below to discussions of pronunciation systems. However, if that issue remains six of one and half a dozen of the other to you, then, well, you have the pleasure of MORE options :)!

 

So, you'll need another basis.

 

Derivatives actually will narrow things down for you--not all programs have that feature, and it's pretty cut-and-dried to find out--but you could also do a separate roots program, so this may not be decisive for you.

 

First Form has some derivative coverage; so does Lively Latin; I think Latin in the Christian Trivium may have some; Great Latin Adventure has derivative worksheets; I am not sure for other programs. If you start a thread on that, you'll get good info. Ditto on format: you can find that at authors' websites, but that's probably the slow way to find out. There are programs in every format.

 

On vocabulary type, I was kind of obscure, but you did read me right. I meant when you look over the vocabulary lists of a given curriculum, what themes do you see? Because that's the world your child is going to be living in when translating. Some programs are consciously aiming at, say, proficiency for reading Caesar later on. I think this may be true of Henle. The vocabulary introduced supports this goal. Others are aiming at a Roman literature more broadly. This is true of Wheelock; I don't know if it's true of any programs for younger children. Other programs begin with a more general-purpose vocabulary suitable for younger children. Some programs include theological vocabulary; others don't. If this area is important to you, I'd encourage you to look over sample chapters etc. made available by publishers/authors and see if you like the world of the translation sentences and the world of the derivative work. Try to see some samples from late enough in the program that the vocab world has developed.

 

When to start--see below. Later has the advantages you mention. In some ways you may want to pick your program and then start it when your children are ready, rather than pick a starting age and then pick your program. (I started Latin in grade 7 and it did not ruin me for languages at all . . . I ended up majoring in Russian.)

 

On translation, how soon/how much: that varies program to program and also varies with the target age of the beginner; the younger the beginner, the less you can do right away, so the programs for the very youngest tilt towards vocabulary and forms. For somewhat older beginners, the path to translation varies depending on the priorities of the author. Some programs aim to impart many forms and lots of vocabulary earlier, with translation kept simple and/or postponed as a result; others weave back and forth a bit more, from forms, to translation, to more forms, to more translation, for a more translation-centered tilt. There are varying assumptions about how long you are going to study Latin underlying these decisions.

 

On English to Latin translation, it's harder, and some make the point that since Latin is no longer a spoken language, why bother with translating into it; others say that it makes Latin study a better foundation for the study of other (spoken) languages later if students work in both directions in Latin. Also that it makes students better translators from Latin if they also translate into Latin.

 

All of these are topics that would make their own great threads . . .

 

 

 

Here are some other threads you may find helpful:

 

 

Which Latin programs do you love and why:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=241811

 

Which Latin and why:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=112650

 

Which programs are grammar-translation and which take a different approach:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=101153

 

When to start Latin:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=241946&page=2

 

Does anyone leave Latin till later:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=109895&page=2

 

Pronunciation systems and which programs use what:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=121236

 

Do macrons (long signs) matter:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=121086

 

Do principal parts and noun genders matter--when to learn them:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=333507

 

I hope these leads are helpful (and not inundating) as you work out your priorities!

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So, what is your diagnosis??? :D

 

 

My diagnosis is that if you just pick up that LCI and start doing it with your older child, many of the things Hunter and CK spoke about will become clearer to you over time (and you'll gain more confidence in your smaller decisions about Latin). It's grammar-based, introduces "child/military/literary" vocabulary, teaches derivatives, is geared towards 9-11 year olds, and leads to LCII and Henle. An 11 or 12 yo starting Henle under a Mom who has never done Latin before will not get through Henle in a year (after all, it was written for 14-15 year olds who were going to spend an hour or more on it per day), but I guarantee if you do it slowly but consistently, many of the above-introduced issues will become clearer and you will come to answers you are comfortable with. My advice is to save this thread and refer back to it from time to time as you go through LCI and LCII.

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abrightmom, Latin could become a HUGE time sucker, taking you away from your priorities. You are right about that. I'm into smaller goals for those people who think of themselves as first generation, I seem to recall you are one of them?

 

I'm up to my neck in making Latin decisions too.

 

#1 pick something you are actually capable of doing, while keeping soup simmering on the stove, watching the bread bake, and keeping tabs on the little ones.

 

#2 Nothing you do "wrong" is life threatening. And if you do something that creates a "bad habit", pat yourself on the back. Your kids have to know a LOT of Latin to have a "bad habit" :-)

 

#3 You need a pronunciation to be able to practice and drill, but it doesn't matter which one. And you CAN switch at a later date without total trauma.

 

Sometimes all we do, is cover enough with out kids, that they feel comfortable later on picking up where we left off. Sometimes playing at the edge of the water provides enough bravery for a child, to pursue swimming on his own as an adult.

 

Dip your toe into something and see how it goes.

 

Classical Katherine, those look like some awesome links!

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I just spoke with my cousin today regarding the same question. She has a high school graduate and two teenagers. She initially started Latin with Latina Christiana. She said at the time Memoria Press was about all she could find and then later switched over to Latin for Children. She highly recommends Latin for Children and said it is an excellent program. Her son was just accepted to BSU's Honors College and is receiving a Brown's scholarship (full ride- sorry to brag, but I am so excited for him!) among other scholarships. They are using Veritas Press curriculum and Latin for Children follows along with the teaching. I've also read up on it a bit, and it says that it is self-teaching, making it great for parents who are learning as well.

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I can tell you why we chose Getting Started With Latin for our first Latin curriculum.

 

-inexpensive -- $18 for the book plus free mp3s -- what a great way to try out Latin!

-spiral approach, short lessons, just a little bit at a time and then plenty of review without being boring

-no writing

-teaches real grammar right away -- nothing against things that start with colors or numbers or the like, but we wanted something that would get her started on grammar.

-not cutesy -- it's humorous sometimes (there seem to be a lot of poets who never carry writing tablets, and farmers who plow the land but do not love it), but DD is turned off by cutesy.

-no need for me to know Latin in order to teach it.

 

We have continued to use it because we really enjoy it; we often do two lessons in a day, but DD gets it just fine (faster than I do, sometimes, and I'm generally good at languages). We'll be transitioning to Level 3 of Latin's Not So Tough in a few weeks; actually, I think DD could start on Level 4, based on the grammar she's learned so far, but there is some vocabulary taught in Level 3 that's not in GSWL, so I would rather a bit of overlap than skipping vocabulary.

 

Truly, I love GSWL like nothing else. I wish they'd make more books like it. Bottom line: because of GSWL, DD, who is the one who requested Latin to begin with, really loves Latin and has positive feelings about it.

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I just spoke with my cousin today regarding the same question. She has a high school graduate and two teenagers. She initially started Latin with Latina Christiana. She said at the time Memoria Press was about all she could find and then later switched over to Latin for Children. She highly recommends Latin for Children and said it is an excellent program. Her son was just accepted to BSU's Honors College and is receiving a Brown's scholarship (full ride- sorry to brag, but I am so excited for him!) among other scholarships. They are using Veritas Press curriculum and Latin for Children follows along with the teaching. I've also read up on it a bit, and it says that it is self-teaching, making it great for parents who are learning as well.

I've been looking at LFC again because it looks fun for my boys (might motivate?). I've also been considering pronunciation and though it's not a deal breaker for me I do prefer classical.

 

I can tell you why we chose Getting Started With Latin for our first Latin curriculum.

 

-inexpensive -- $18 for the book plus free mp3s -- what a great way to try out Latin!

-spiral approach, short lessons, just a little bit at a time and then plenty of review without being boring

-no writing

-teaches real grammar right away -- nothing against things that start with colors or numbers or the like, but we wanted something that would get her started on grammar.

-not cutesy -- it's humorous sometimes (there seem to be a lot of poets who never carry writing tablets, and farmers who plow the land but do not love it), but DD is turned off by cutesy.

-no need for me to know Latin in order to teach it.

 

We have continued to use it because we really enjoy it; we often do two lessons in a day, but DD gets it just fine (faster than I do, sometimes, and I'm generally good at languages). We'll be transitioning to Level 3 of Latin's Not So Tough in a few weeks; actually, I think DD could start on Level 4, based on the grammar she's learned so far, but there is some vocabulary taught in Level 3 that's not in GSWL, so I would rather a bit of overlap than skipping vocabulary.

 

Truly, I love GSWL like nothing else. I wish they'd make more books like it. Bottom line: because of GSWL, DD, who is the one who requested Latin to begin with, really loves Latin and has positive feelings about it.

 

I recently picked up GSWL and decided to start with it because we have it. If nothing else, we'll be building a habit of "Latin" being on the weekly schedule. Perhaps we'll love it! I do hear a lot of fantastic feedback about GSWL.

 

Thanks Katharine for the links! :001_smile::001_smile: You've been so generous with your help.

 

Thanks Hunter for the encouraging words and ideas. :001_smile:

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