Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo

"Easier" French classical literature?


13 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 madteaparty

madteaparty

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4612 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:25 PM

We are just wrapping up Boule de Suif (Maupassant), have done some Moliere before and other Maupassant stories. I had planed on Pere Goriot next but that 20 pages of rant at the beginning is giving me pause.

Any entry-level classics you recommend?

ETA. I have and love French textbooks, but prefer this whole classics approach. Mainly because I can find the audio for it, usually. Maybe I should just stick to what I've decided...

 

Camus always comes up but am trying to save for later.


Edited by madteaparty, 14 February 2018 - 01:26 PM.


#2 Joan in GE

Joan in GE

    trying to listen....

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2858 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:41 PM

I forget how old your student is...

 

There's always the Swiss end of high school exam literature list to look through...(French, German, English, etc)

 

On this page

 

https://www.sbfi.adm...e-maturite.html

 

Scroll down to the link 

 

Listes des œuvres littéraires, valables dès 2015 (PDF, 447 kB, 15.12.2014)



#3 madteaparty

madteaparty

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4612 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:54 PM

Hi, he's 13.

Hadn't thought of Beckett, your list reminded me, he wrote in French. I think Waiting for Godot has like 3 words. That might be our speed...And I love Maupassant, maybe we just stay here permanently.:) :)

Edited by madteaparty, 14 February 2018 - 05:10 PM.


#4 Joan in GE

Joan in GE

    trying to listen....

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2858 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:21 PM

At 13, can't he read Jules Verne? There are some very interesting ones...Trying to remember the names as ours are packed away....

 

well, the ones I proposed seem a little dark so I've edited them.

 

Sorry, I'm drawing blanks otherwise as now that they're not visible on shelves, I tend to forget and the young are not here to help.


Edited by Joan in GE, 14 February 2018 - 02:26 PM.

  • madteaparty likes this

#5 madteaparty

madteaparty

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4612 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:28 PM

At 13, can't he read Jules Verne? There are some very interesting ones...Trying to remember the names as ours are packed away....

 

well, the ones I proposed seem a little dark so I've edited them.

 

Sorry, I'm drawing blanks otherwise as now that they're not visible on shelves, I tend to forget and the young are not here to help.

He has read the famous Verne stuff, but not the ones you linked, so please link again, and thank you :)

(we do dark. so much dark).
 



#6 Joan in GE

Joan in GE

    trying to listen....

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2858 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:30 PM

He has read the famous Verne stuff, but not the ones you linked, so please link again, and thank you :)

(we do dark. so much dark).
 

ah, Les cinq cents millions de la Begum

 

et Les tribulations d'un chinois en Chine

 

:-(


  • madteaparty likes this

#7 bibiche

bibiche

    Hive Mind Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2683 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:19 PM

I've probably already asked, but has he tried George Sand? Or Merimee? Giono? Or plays like La Trilogie marseillaise de Pagnol? They are nice and light.



#8 madteaparty

madteaparty

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4612 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:22 PM

I've probably already asked, but has he tried George Sand? Or Merimee? Giono? Or plays like La Trilogie marseillaise de Pagnol? They are nice and light.

We haven’t tackled Sand, any recommendations to start with?
Pagnol he’s read. Thank you!

#9 Roadrunner

Roadrunner

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5356 posts

Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:36 PM

And do any of these come with accompanying workbooks? Lit guides? Anything that could be used as a supplementary writing/comprehension extra, or are Lit guides uniquely American phenomena?

#10 loesje22000

loesje22000

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3918 posts

Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:06 AM

We needed some more current stuff to be able to tackle an other level of classics.
We read :

http://www.averbode.be/7enpoche
Mazerunner
Language magazines, dd started with Mary Glasgow, we now use: http://www.elimagazi.../magazines.html

Literature guide is something typical for English Languages in my eyes, but Joan introduced me to profil guides:
https://www.amazon.f...254&rnid=301130
  • Joan in GE likes this

#11 madteaparty

madteaparty

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4612 posts

Posted 15 February 2018 - 07:44 AM

And do any of these come with accompanying workbooks? Lit guides? Anything that could be used as a supplementary writing/comprehension extra, or are Lit guides uniquely American phenomena?

For the Maupassant, I happened to have a French textbook that basically covered all of it-they didn’t reprint the whole novella but expected you to read the whole thing and there were excellent comprehension questions, essay prompts, and even more literary context things, such as a rubric on “words of realism” using other examples. It was perfect.
I’d continue using this book because it has little pieces of literature organized around a theme, example: we are doing “the City” next and it has an essay from Sarte on NYC, and the Balzac piece on Paris, some architecture stuff type stuff, etc. It’s just I really (really) prefer to have the audio, but if you don’t need that,get a french textbook and teacher manual.
There are lit guide versions, I had a Moliere that way, look at biblio-college series but there’s a ton. Alas, they’re meant for school and I couldn’t find the teacher manual (or even answer book) for those. My own french is crap as you know

Edited by madteaparty, 15 February 2018 - 07:48 AM.

  • Roadrunner likes this

#12 bibiche

bibiche

    Hive Mind Larvae

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2683 posts

Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:20 PM

We haven’t tackled Sand, any recommendations to start with?
!


La Petite Fadette maybe?

#13 Roadrunner

Roadrunner

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5356 posts

Posted 15 February 2018 - 05:59 PM

My kid wants to abandon Le Collier Rouge. I am loving it, but he is finding the subject matter a bit over his head.
So I guess back to Terre des Lettres, which seems so simple now in comparison. I think I will go back to the Collier Rouge over the summer where hopefully we don’t have much to do.
  • loesje22000 likes this

#14 Laura Corin

Laura Corin

    She who plants flowers for bees

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24190 posts

Posted 15 February 2018 - 06:19 PM

In high school I read Candide, and Hobbes has also been reading it for fun.

I also studied Le Grand Meaulnes, and Hobbes is studying Huis Clos

Edited by Laura Corin, 15 February 2018 - 06:21 PM.

  • madteaparty and bibiche like this