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Roadrunner

Expression Ecrite, CLE

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I know, another French thread. 😳 I have it figured out, well, almost figured out, buuuuut, I need a systematic approach to writing.

Since most people don't use CLE books, I thought I would try my luck here. Has anybody used this series for writing? There are 4 levels, some overlapping on CEFR levels. I wonder if this is another series that we should start at level one and work through.

I promise, no more French angst. 😋

 

Here is the link to level 1.

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/2090352019/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2GRG3YFWDTCL&coliid=I3PPJPVDLMR5N5

Edited by Roadrunner
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We use these books:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Activite+pour+le+cle&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3AActivite+pour+le+cle

As exam prep.

That serie has no instructions just exercises.

I own the A2, B1 and B2 book.

Compared to dd's main textbook these exercises seem pretty advanced to me.

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We use these books:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Activite+pour+le+cle&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3AActivite+pour+le+cle

As exam prep.

That serie has no instructions just exercises.

I own the A2, B1 and B2 book.

Compared to dd's main textbook these exercises seem pretty advanced to me.

I don't know where I read it, but somewhere it said that French writing is particularly particular. Will this series teach us all the way up to writing g an essay?

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Ufhh.. We'll I can't tell you much except that I love CLE books and I am a complete junkie and since I haven't seen that series in person I just bought it :(

 

... I don't have too many books. I just don't have enough shelves :( I'd be happy to review it as soon as it arrives if you'd like...

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I don't know where I read it, but somewhere it said that French writing is particularly particular. Will this series teach us all the way up to writing g an essay?

I am curious what you mean by particularly particular. My d just writes her French essays the same way she writes English essays. Circumlocution is expected and accepted for lower level writers (even in major at the college sr level.)

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I am curious what you mean by particularly particular. My d just writes her French essays the same way she writes English essays. Circumlocution is expected and accepted for lower level writers (even in major at the college sr level.)

We were taught very specific formats and rules for various composition and essay types in school in France.

 

I don't remember details any more, just that instructions and grading were very persnickety. A grade above 50% was passing, and averages were never much higher than that.

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We were taught very specific formats and rules for various composition and essay types in school in France.

 

I don't remember details any more, just that instructions and grading were very persnickety. A grade above 50% was passing, and averages were never much higher than that.

Interesting. The Francophone French teacher who has read dd's essays never made any comment to that effect. She has simply affirmed that they are on par with what her high school students write. Dd simply conforms to MLA type regulations. (The French teacher never mentioned a different system. Now I am curious!!)

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I am curious what you mean by particularly particular. My d just writes her French essays the same way she writes English essays. Circumlocution is expected and accepted for lower level writers (even in major at the college sr level.)

Basically what Maize said. I wish I had deeper understanding, but was told depending on the genre, writing patters differ. I know that's a vague answer.

 

I am just looking for writing excercises to move from informal emails to business letters to eventually persuasive essays. Strictly writing. I do have a native speaker to correct them, I just need something to follow one step at a time.

Edited by Roadrunner

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Basically what Maize said. I wish I had deeper understanding, but was told depending on the genre, writing patters differ. I know that's a vague answer.

 

I am just looking for writing excercises to move from informal emails to business letters to eventually persuasive essays. Strictly writing. I do have a native speaker to correct them, I just need something to follow one step at a time.

You need to follow what you are comfortable doing. I will share, though, that my Dd didn't ever study French composition as separate French writing instruction beyond grammatical instruction and correct French expression. She simply wrote in French similarly to how she would write equivalent assignments in English. I have zero qualms about her jumping into 300+ French classes or attending Paris Dauphine with all of her classes taught in French.

 

If we are wrong, we'll know next yr or 2. :)

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You need to follow what you are comfortable doing. I will share, though, that my Dd didn't ever study French composition as separate French writing instruction beyond grammatical instruction and correct French expression. She simply wrote in French similarly to how she would write equivalent assignments in English. I have zero qualms about her jumping into 300+ French classes or attending Paris Dauphine with all of her classes taught in French.

 

If we are wrong, we'll know next yr or 2. :)

 

 

I don't think you need to follow a French Lycee style curriculum in writing instruction to be able to write in the language; it would certainly not be necessary for US university French classes at any level. If she attends a university program designed for native speakers in France there may a learning curve but I think that would be expected of a foreign student.

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I found this article which you may find interesting. I haven't finished reading it, but I think it lays out differences pretty clearly. I don't think my Dd necessarily falls into either category bc her writing style is more classic essayist than formulaic structured writing. I am going to have her read it later on. I think she could easily move to the description written in 3.

 

https://www.erudit.org/revue/meta/2006/v51/n1/012998ar.pdf

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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I think it is folded into the jardin des lettres and terre des lettres series.

I will try to explain the writing exercises from our CLE serie tomorrow (our time) and terre / jardin de lettres.

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Basically what Maize said. I wish I had deeper understanding, but was told depending on the genre, writing patters differ. I know that's a vague answer.

 

I am just looking for writing excercises to move from informal emails to business letters to eventually persuasive essays. Strictly writing. I do have a native speaker to correct them, I just need something to follow one step at a time.

I have no idea what you are looking for, but the DELF books have "response Libre" prompts that follow the chapter and have something to do with it "if you were XYZ, how would you react to ABC?" etc. These are very short essays. My DS's French (strict IME) has not said much about format but maybe these aren't long enough. Just you know, grammar, orthographe, the usual.

Look at the phantom chapter I just sent you.

Edited by madteaparty
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I had forgotten about this thread, but I did have a chance to review the book (level 1). Have you found something that works by now?

Yes, I did find something else.

Rédiger un résumé, un compte-rendu, une synthèse By Hachett

https://www.amazon.fr/gp/aw/d/2011550912/ref=pd_aw_fbt_14_img_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=BY22VDY0Y7D7GPX2PD4X

 

But please, I would love a review of CLE book. My shelves can handle another French writing book. :)

Edited by Roadrunner

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Yes, I did find something else.

Rédiger un résumé, un compte-rendu, une synthèse By Hachett

https://www.amazon.fr/gp/aw/d/2011550912/ref=pd_aw_fbt_14_img_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=BY22VDY0Y7D7GPX2PD4X

 

But please, I would love a review of CLE book. My shelves can handle another French writing book. :)

 

Ohh that one looks good. I'd love to hear how it works as you are using it.

Expression Écrite is not on par with the quality of other CLE publications. It is a very dry set of writing prompts. The bulk of the pages are covered with black and white pictures and documents to guide and answer the questions (in the "realia" style). Since I was looking at the A1 book, it starts of with "C'est un passeport" and writing four other sentences based on that model. I think there are actually more writing exercises in the Grammaire Progressive niveau débutant. Near the end it has some "state your opinion on x and justify". Very test prep oriented. It might be more fair to review the higher level books but I'd bet there is a lot better out there. By the time you are making stylistic decisions like how often to use the passive voice, you probably need something that is geared toward native speakers.

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Ohh that one looks good. I'd love to hear how it works as you are using it.

Expression Écrite is not on par with the quality of other CLE publications. It is a very dry set of writing prompts. The bulk of the pages are covered with black and white pictures and documents to guide and answer the questions (in the "realia" style). Since I was looking at the A1 book, it starts of with "C'est un passeport" and writing four other sentences based on that model. I think there are actually more writing exercises in the Grammaire Progressive niveau débutant. Near the end it has some "state your opinion on x and justify". Very test prep oriented. It might be more fair to review the higher level books but I'd bet there is a lot better out there. By the time you are making stylistic decisions like how often to use the passive voice, you probably need something that is geared toward native speakers.

Thank you for review. Junior Scholaire book also has a ton of prompts, but it has been tougher for me to figure out how to use them effectively. We are planning on starting the writing series next year. Right now kids are working through the grammar book, which has them writing out up to 20 sentences a day, leaving little room for composition.

That series also has a follow up persuasive essay book, sonideally we will work through both over the next two years.

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