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goldenecho

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About goldenecho

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    http://imaginativehomeschool.blogspot.com

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  1. I was wondering if I could share your comment on by blog where I offer guidance to people using the Holy Land Adventure series by Group (not the series that includes Roar, but another one they do where different Bible stories are presented in a living history style format). I also moderate two Facebook groups related to this (one that someone else started and I later became a moderator for, and another that I started after group started repeating Holy Land Adventure programs in stead of making new ones, for churches working to make their own similar style programs), and would share that post there. The issues with Roar has come up (some people are using the Holy Land Adventure as a back-up program because of the problem with Roar, and others are confused as to what the issue was about.). I thought this (what you said) was something that people needed to hear. I would let them know it came from a comment on a discussion of this on another forum I'm in. I would use your name or handle only if you wanted me to.
  2. I was wondering if I could share your comment on by blog where I offer guidance to people using the Holy Land Adventure series by Group (not the series that includes Roar, but another one they do where different Bible stories are presented in a living history style format). I also moderate two Facebook groups related to this (one that someone else started and I later became a moderator for, and another that I started after group started repeating Holy Land Adventure programs in stead of making new ones, for churches working to make their own similar style programs), and would share that post there. The issues with Roar has come up (some people are using the Holy Land Adventure as a back-up program because of the problem with Roar, and others are confused as to what the issue was about.). I thought this was such a good explanation. I would let them know it came from a comment on a discussion of this on another forum I'm in. I would use your name or handle only if you wanted me to.
  3. I've seen the letter group sent responding to this (but can't find it now) and they have changed that. I don't know what the original text was, but it said something like there was one instance that could be mis-interpreted as referring to Africa as a country. The thing about slavery...I've heard of several instances where kids, as part of history in school, were asked to take place in a mock slave auction (in at least one only the black kids were "auctioned"). That hit a raw nerve for many parents. I usually like the play-acting feature of Group's VBS (our church used it's Holy Land Adventures, which recreate Biblical stories living history style)...but I can see where imitating slavery could be over the line.
  4. Does anyone know where I can find a free cursive font (like, school cursive). Or one of those places where you can make your own worksheets using their fonts and such. I know those sites are there but now that I'm looking for one I can't find it.
  5. Wow...3 HOURS for an 8th grader is a LOT. You still get 1 1/2 hours in after that? Is it interest based stuff?
  6. These aren't multisensory at all, or made for that age group, but I stumbled on these today and thought of you. Might be some nice "slip this into history" stuff in these.... http://www.ancientworldalive.com/greek-and-latin-roots?fbclid=IwAR1wiSQf6B1bv9_ddW0dUz57iaqisbG_eeDdfRIIVNthp62gT1oiQU4pnJI
  7. This site has suggestions of easy reading activities you can do at whatever stage you think he's at... http://www.charlottemasonhelp.com/2009/03/reading-lessons.html I'd also play games where you let him make silly words with magnet letters and sound it out for him. That can help him see what the sounding out process is like. (It also helps them learn the necessity of vowels as you explain that you can't sound out a word without them). ProgressivePhonics.com has free readers and little lessons you can read to him that explain the phonics (the letter sounds, but also the phonics beyond that like blends and such) in a really fun way (personifying the letters and such) and are super short so would be easy for a 4 year old attention span (an you read with the child...it's color coded so he reads some words and you read others). If it doesn't work, no loss just let it go cause it was free anyways. I will say one thing though, we started using it at the intermediate lessons, not the very beginning lessons, and like 100 EZ lesson there's some capitalization issues with those. Not with every book, I think but with some, so you might consider subbing out something else for the ones that have that problem. The later ones are great though, and I haven't noticed any problems like that with them. Mouse Makes Words is a fun little book to read at this stage. You read most of it, but you can have your child read the BIG words the mouse is changing letter on and let your child try to guess what the new word will be when the letters are swapped out. 🙂
  8. STEM to Story combines writing and science...and has writing projects for various levels from grades 5-8. So, I'm not sure which of these contain writing assignments, but I have a list of resources that combine history and science here: http://imaginativehomeschool.blogspot.com/2017/08/resources-combining-history-and-science.html I think many of these would be easy to add a writing assignment to even if they didn't specifically have a writing assignment attached. There are resources for several eras labled "Idea Web" on those lists, and those all have questions that connect history and science, which though I think initially intended for classroom discussion could easily be used for writing assignments. I've listed a lot of his resources in the link above, but it's hard to tell them from the rest. This teacher has cross-curriculum units that often involve writing, science, history, and various other subjects. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Portable-Gifted-And-Talented/PreK-12-Subject-Area/Social-Studies-History
  9. The Lost Kingdoms of Africa videos are good (I'm having trouble linking to the one on Ethiopia directly for some reason, but here's the playlist with all of them and Ethiopia is the 2nd one). Can't remember though what era this covers (whether it covered past Axsum).
  10. The Addition/Subtraction/Multiplication/Division Facts the Stick series has short lessons followed by a week of games. You can play against your child because, while the games require using the math facts, they all have elements of chance that make it just as likely for you or your child to win. I've listed some other educational games I like. You could get together with other homeschoolers at his age or level to play these. Silly Sentences Kingdominoes (when he gets to multiplication). Zeus on the Loose (mythology and math) Monopoly (it's long, but very competitive, and good for money math). Race to a Dollar (free game) https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Race-to-a-Dollar-a-Coin-Exchange-Game-Freebie-1162939 Prince Padania has a lot of fun learning games, many free (https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Prince-Padania) Pokemon card games have a lot of addition/subtraction in them. And of course anything can be made into a game. I use dice and gameboards like the ones below and I put tic-tacks and small coins (pennies, nickles, dimes) on some of the spaces. Then I made cards for all my kids (each kid has a different color of cards, and the cards have questions that are at their level, so they can compete against each other but it's not unfair). The kids can only move on by answering the cards correctly (so they answer a question before moving). If they land on a candy or coin they get to keep it, and then there's a slightly bigger prize for the first one to reach the end (maybe a quarter, or two candies in stead of one...but everyone who reaches the end gets something). My kids love it. I got them to play it in summer before we were even homeschooling. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/FREEBIE-Blank-BW-Game-Boards-2604845
  11. Mind if I ask what state? Just curious. Might be useful to know at some point.
  12. For those ages, I like the videos on http://foreignlanguagesforkids.com/ . You'll have to follow it up with something more but its a great starting place.
  13. Thanks for clarifying. Hadn't answered earlier and I'm glad I read this first. Being by themselves most of the time is very different than for a few hours 2 days a week (might help stave off other misunderstanding comments to go back and edit your original post to add that). If the child's autism is mild that doesn't sound too bad (I've known some kids with mild autism that could handle that at 9, and others with more severe Autism that couldn't). I would suggest asking for free/cheap recommendations for writing curriculum that would be easy for a new homeschooler to manage in the the Learning Challenges board on these forums. I started writing late with my son and was still looking when he returned to school this year so have no recommendations there. If spelling is also an issue, I loved All About Spelling for my kiddo who struggled in nearly everything. It is not "cheap" but it is easy to find the books used (and are not too expensive), and all the words on the cards are also listed in the chapters so they can make those themselves, and the letter tiles you only have to buy once and they'll even replace I think up to 5 of them free if you loose some (or they could get the letter tiles app in stead, since he likes doing things online). It's hands on but easy to use (pretty open and go...not a ton of prep). Here are two places with lists of free curriculum, but I can't say which would be easy for the parents or good for him. I've only used, on the 2nd list below, Progressive Phonics (which he's likely to be past) and the Experimenting With the Vikings unit study (which is great, especially if he likes science or Vikings, but is hands on), and Kahn Academy for math, which is great but I feel like at that age maybe not enough on it's own. http://imaginativehomeschool.blogspot.com/2016/07/complete-curriculum-for-free.html and Another thing for them to look into is if there is any way that he could continue to get services. Sometimes it's possible. Here in California it's sometimes possible to homeschool through a charter, and get both services and funds to use for tutoring and curriculum. That's not available everywhere but I have heard of some states where if you are homeschooling a child with a special need you can get services for them without having to send them to school.
  14. This tracks a little with my own experience. When my youngest was struggling in school, and I knew he needed something different, the first thing I looked into were private schools. I didn't feel confident enough yet to try myself. But they were more expensive than we could afford at the time. If I were here in California I MIGHT have gone the full time charter school route (MIGHT, because working with him over the summer to "catch him up" built up my confidence that I could teach him, and convinced me only one on one teaching would do, at least at first).
  15. If I was homeschooling year round and not just in the summer, I would absolutely buy the Charlotte Mason STEM and HISTORY bundle. "California Out of the Box" I've heard is a good curriculum, I've ALMOST bought the Explore Medieval Kingdoms curriculum before to supplement Story of the World. The graphics from the Nature Science website would be useful, I've been curious about Math Mammoth, and I've supplemented with Mystery of History before (it was my second choice to Story of the World, and I used something from their free sampler to cover the Maccabees, something SOTW skipped, in Volume I). BUT, even though I'm doing some afterschooling and homeschooling during the summer, and we're going to keep doing SOTW and are in the middle ages, I am really having to cut down on supplementary stuff if I'm going to get very far at all in just 2 months, and we already have a math curriculum I can use, and they covered California history in school this year, plus I have a free curriculum that would be fine just for adding a little CA history to SOTW, so I'm resisting the temptation to buy a bunch of stuff I probably won't be able to use.
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