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sweet2ndchance

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  1. She's paying $220 per night, not per week. It works out to just under $15 an hour for 3 kids. It's about average for babysitting in the places where I've lived. Normally, overnight baby sitting pays a bit more than average in my experience. Per the question, I would ask what gives, ask for the advance back and expect that I wouldn't get the money back nor would I expect her to babysit anymore. Like the others have said.
  2. That's just it though. It changes day to day what he can/will read without sounding out. Yesterday, same day he had the "wheat" revelation, he was sounding out "A cat and a rat. A rat and a cat." when we were trying to find some super easy fluency readings. But he also read "Gus wept, "Help! Help!"" without sounding it out yesterday. I'll try that Audioblox exercise with him a little later and report back.
  3. Too funny! My youngest's favorite Beatrix Potter was The Rolly-Polly Pudding lol. Our days of reading picture books aloud are almost over here. 😞 I'm going to miss them when they are gone.
  4. Some shorter picture heavy chapter books to bridge the gap between picture books and chapter books: The Story of Diva and Flea by Mo Willems Leroy Ninker Saddles Up by Kate DiCamillo (who doesn't love a story about a horse that likes spaghetti?) Princess Cora and the Crocodile by Laura Amy Schlitz The Mercy Watson series by Kate DiCamillo (not my favorite but many kids love it) Mouse Tales by Arnold Lobel or anything by Arnold Lobel really Heartwood Hotel by Kallie George Ivy series by Katherine Coville
  5. I love Lakeshore Learning... my wallet, not so much lol Audioblox sounds familiar. Maybe it was something we did with oldest ds when he was having trouble learning to read? I know he did Earobics for a while when he was in speech therapy... And now, just because real kids are complicated, Ds does this.... He was playing Minecraft today and he wanted me to help him spell the word "wheat". I told him to sound it out. He said the first sound was /w/ so I told him to use "two-letter /w/". Took him a couple tries but he figured out it was "wh". Then I asked him what is the next sound, he says /ee/ and he types in the letter e and it auto fills in the word "wheat" for him before I can tell him which /ee/ phonogram to use. He says, "Oh it has the word "eat" at the end. And the phonogram "eat, bread, steak" /ee/, /e/, /A/." He only learned that phonogram last week. I was dumbfounded for a second because I was still having to help him on the phonogram reviews with that phonogram last week. We haven't done the word "eat" yet as a spelling word so it is not one I would expect him to recognize. The only formal exposure he has had to the word "eat" is as part of our mnemonic for the phonogram ea. So I was thinking about dropping SWR at least for a while like you said @PeterPanbut today's events have me in a quandary. Is it evidence that SWR is working its magic, however slowly for DS or just a one off epiphany? I used SWR exclusively to teach both my girls how to read. It didn't really work for oldest ds. But however similar they may be, DS8 is not oldest ds. Oi, why do real kids have to be so complicated lol!
  6. You do it in bite size pieces, not all at once. Some kids love to cuddle on the couch and listen to stories. Others just don't. My youngest (8.5yo) is not a story cuddler. He likes to listen to audiobooks at bedtime which accounts for maybe 30 minutes a day. The rest we do in bite size pieces throughout the day. When my older kids were little, we read over meals, we listened to audiobooks in the car, I read to them in the bathtub when I had a captive audience. Only one of my six kids would have sat and listened to stories for an hour at a time in early elementary school but she had been listening to chapter books since she was a nursing infant. Every time she nursed, I did a read aloud with the other kids. You are doing nothing wrong. Keep reading picture books throughout the day. They will only let you read picture books aloud to them for a short time in their lives. They have the rest of their lives for chapter book and other books.
  7. My family would happily eat breakfast for dinner with scones as one things served. The recipe I use for scones uses plain yogurt. Omit the sugar and raisins and it makes a good biscuit recipe as well.
  8. I'm doing something similar just with Google Slides instead of Quizlet. Yes, encode and decode everyday. And retaining words that give him issues in the list until he can both encode and decode fluently. It sounds like the only thing we are not doing is the 2 - 3 hours a day. If that's what it is going to take, we can make that work. In bite size pieces, of course. Right now, we are spending 45 minutes to an hour a day on reading. We can up that, no problem. Well, no problem for me. He might have a problem with it lol. But that's where we can do the motivational stuff.
  9. His auditory processing is actually amazingly good. He definitely makes up for his vision issues with stellar auditory processing. He has been tested for auditory processing by an audiologist and passed. We did the Barton screener forever ago. A year or more maybe? He barely passed at that time. I just gave it again and he passed no problem. I'm thinking about possibly recording him reading and posting. Would that give a better picture?
  10. We've done the Rooney foundation O-G stuff and your RAN/RAS. He can do the RAN/RAS without a single issue... until you try to replace the colored dots with words. I'm hoping to avoid the public school evals but it is looking unavoidable. Sigh.
  11. I am diagnosed with hEDS. I really don't have much to add that others haven't already said. I have a whole slew of comorbid conditions, including autoimmune conditions. They have always run in my family so I suspect many others have hEDS just not diagnosed or known to me. In the way of treatment, most of mine is directed at treating the symptoms (so for example, levothyroxine for my thyroid condition) and pain management. A daily regiment of meloxicam helps. Without it, I'm completely bedridden everyday in pain. With it, I have good pain days when I don't need stronger pain meds and bad pain days where I do need stronger pain meds. My hEDS didn't come on suddenly. It explained various different one off symptoms I've had all my life as a connected whole. If you can't think back to her childhood and remember a ton of just little odd symptoms that can suddenly be explained as part of hEDS, I would ask for more labwork or a second opinion as some of the others have suggested.
  12. He has also done straight OG, both with a tutor and with me. The tutor moved away. I forgot to add that in the first post. He still gets lots of O-G methods no matter which programs we use because we adapt it to him and make it O-G. I'm starting to think I may need to resort to bribery (we joke that bribery is his love language lol) and do multiple lessons per day to get him the extra practice he needs... good idea or recipe for disaster?
  13. Ds is 8.5yo, very likely dyslexic but not formally diagnosed and had eye tracking problems but went through vision therapy and has so-so results (it definitely helped but it doesn't seem to be the entire problem of why ds can't read fluently yet). He can blend easily and well but fluency just isn't following. He is stuck in that agonizing limbo stage of reading where he sounds out every sound, of every word, every time he reads it. He has been stuck here for about a year now. He has a handful of words that he recognizes at a glance but there is no rhyme or reason as to which words he knows and which he doesn't so that gives no clues as to where he needs help or extra practice. For example, he can read with fluency the words: dog, cat, so, of, over and bed, but will have to sound out and sometimes mess up the words: bog, no, on, done, little and hot. He still sounds out most 3 letter cvc words, sometimes with chunks, sometimes not. He can recognize a chunk in one word but not recognize the same chunk in the next word. He is good at splitting larger words into syllables but again, he sounds out every letter, every time. His oldest brother, ds23 who is now an adult, did a very similar thing when he was young and learning to read except ds23 didn't go through vision therapy. Ds23 didn't learn to read until he was 9.5yo. I had been beating my head against a wall since he was 4yo trying to teach him using every way and curriculum under the sun to do it. It was like he just woke up one day and said, "Hey, I want to read now." and he just started reading and never stopped. He was reading above grade level within a year or two just like his younger siblings who learned to read at 4yo, 6yo, 3yo and 7yo respectively. Part of me says Ds8.5 is very similar personality-wise to ds23 so maybe we just need to keep plugging away and he will just have the same epiphany one day that ds23 did and start reading. But another part of me says do I really want to take that chance, ya know? But what else can I do to encourage fluency? My other kids either slowly built fluency with practice like most kids do or just became fluent one day with no warning like oldest ds. Right now, we have been doing SWR with lukewarm results and a lot of resistance from ds8.5yo. Handwriting is another issue though it is not quite to the dysgraphia stage like his second oldest brother, ds21. I was just given a copy of Phonics Pathways last night. I've thought about just working on reading and work on spelling/writing as a separate skill using Phonics Pathways. I also have SWR obviously, 100EZ lessons (I hate how cluttered the pages are though and the odd font throws ds off), Ordinary Parent's Guide (I use it for practice sentences mostly) and LOE Foundations (so. many. moving. parts.). We really don't have the funds right now to buy any more curriculum so we need to use something we have. Suggestions, tips or stories of what to do when fluency just doesn't follow with repeated exposure are appreciated. Just wanted to add that ds8.5yo is otherwise very smart. Very math and science oriented. Will explain very advanced physics concepts with ease and understanding, physics is his favorite area of science. He is very math intuitive and constantly surprises me with understanding and using math that I haven't taught him yet. His reading comprehension is spot on. If he can read it, however haltingly, he can comprehend it. His listening comprehension is much higher than that. He asks and answers questions beyond just the literal "what just happened?" type questions. He listens to audiobooks every day for an hour or two, by choice, and I read aloud to him as much as I can. He reads aloud for 15 to 20 minutes a day most days. That's usually the most either one of us can stand of him reading aloud. ETA- He has also done straight OG, both with a tutor and with me. The tutor moved away. I forgot to add that in the first post. He still gets lots of O-G methods no matter which programs we use because we adapt it to him and make it O-G. I'm starting to think I may need to resort to bribery (we joke that bribery is his love language lol) and do multiple lessons per day to get him the extra practice he needs... good idea or recipe for disaster?
  14. Ours is exactly like you describe. I took the wire shelves out immediately (there were only 3 of them) and put a plastic 5 shelf unit from Walmart in there for the first little while we lived here. Then I built in wooden shelves a few years ago. It was time consuming but not hard to put in the custom shelves.
  15. Ds is 8.5yo, very likely dyslexic but not formally diagnosed and had eye tracking problems but went through vision therapy and has so-so results (it definitely helped but it doesn't seem to be the entire problem of why ds can't read fluently yet). He can blend easily and well but fluency just isn't following. He is stuck in that agonizing limbo stage of reading where he sounds out every sound, of every word, every time he reads it. He has been stuck here for about a year now. He has a handful of words that he recognizes at a glance but there is no rhyme or reason as to which words he knows and which he doesn't so that gives no clues as to where he needs help or extra practice. For example, he can read with fluency the words: dog, cat, so, of, over and bed, but will have to sound out and sometimes mess up the words: bog, no, on, done, little and hot. He still sounds out most 3 letter cvc words, sometimes with chunks, sometimes not. He can recognize a chunk in one word but not recognize the same chunk in the next word. He is good at splitting larger words into syllables but again, he sounds out every letter, every time. His oldest brother, ds23 who is now an adult, did a very similar thing when he was young and learning to read except ds23 didn't go through vision therapy. Ds23 didn't learn to read until he was 9.5yo. I had been beating my head against a wall since he was 4yo trying to teach him using every way and curriculum under the sun to do it. It was like he just woke up one day and said, "Hey, I want to read now." and he just started reading and never stopped. He was reading above grade level within a year or two just like his younger siblings who learned to read at 4yo, 6yo, 3yo and 7yo respectively. Part of me says Ds8.5 is very similar personality-wise to ds23 so maybe we just need to keep plugging away and he will just have the same epiphany one day that ds23 did and start reading. But another part of me says do I really want to take that chance, ya know? But what else can I do to encourage fluency? My other kids either slowly built fluency with practice like most kids do or just became fluent one day with no warning like oldest ds. Right now, we have been doing SWR with lukewarm results and a lot of resistance from ds8.5yo. Handwriting is another issue though it is not quite to the dysgraphia stage like his second oldest brother, ds21. I was just given a copy of Phonics Pathways last night. I've thought about just working on reading and work on spelling/writing as a separate skill using Phonics Pathways. I also have SWR obviously, 100EZ lessons (I hate how cluttered the pages are though and the odd font throws ds off), Ordinary Parent's Guide (I use it for practice sentences mostly) and LOE Foundations (so. many. moving. parts.). We really don't have the funds right now to buy any more curriculum so we need to use something we have. Suggestions, tips or stories of what to do when fluency just doesn't follow with repeated exposure are appreciated. Just wanted to add that ds8.5yo is otherwise very smart. Very math and science oriented. Will explain very advanced physics concepts with ease and understanding, physics is his favorite area of science. He is very math intuitive and constantly surprises me with understanding and using math that I haven't taught him yet. His reading comprehension is spot on. If he can read it, however haltingly, he can comprehend it. His listening comprehension is much higher than that. He asks and answers questions beyond just the literal "what just happened?" type questions. He listens to audiobooks every day for an hour or two, by choice, and I read aloud to him as much as I can. He reads aloud for 15 to 20 minutes a day most days. That's usually the most either one of us can stand of him reading aloud.
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