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SueTx

What to use for Algebra 2 after Jacob's Geometry?

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Dd used BJU for pre-algebra and algebra. She is currently using Jacob's for geometry and really enjoying it. I had planned on using BJU for algebra 2, but am now wondering if there is something more along the lines of Jacob's out there. I can't find that Jacob's has an algebra 2 unless I'm missing something. Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Sue

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My oldest used the beta version of Kinetic Books Algebra II after she finished Jacobs Geometry. My middle will finish Jacobs Geometry some time in the next month and then start Kinetic Books Algebra II.

 

You should know that KB Algebra II does not have a solution manual. Many of the problems have immediate feedback with stepped help to walk you through to the answer. The end-of-unit problems do not have immediate feedback and are supposed to be done with pencil and paper. Only the odd answers are provided for these, but the odds are plenty.

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Dd used BJU for pre-algebra and algebra. She is currently using Jacob's for geometry and really enjoying it. I had planned on using BJU for algebra 2, but am now wondering if there is something more along the lines of Jacob's out there. I can't find that Jacob's has an algebra 2 unless I'm missing something. Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Sue

 

 

Well, Foerster's is a *little* like Jacobs Algebra/Geometry (some corny/joke names in the problems; incremental). BUT... it is a whole lot TOUGHER than Jacobs -- much more rigorous, MANY more problems per lesson, much harder/more complex problems, goes WAY into trig topics, many problems have you write computer programs... Frankly, Jacobs feels like a high school program and Foerster feels like a college level course. It's been a stretch for our older "mathy" DS; I often only have him do a quarter of the problems in a lesson, and he still works for an hour. While he enjoyed Jacobs Algebra and Geometry, he's only tolerating the Foerster's. If I had it to do over again, I would have gone with something less rigorous for him.

 

BEST of luck, whatever you go with! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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Well, Foerster's is a *little* like Jacobs Algebra/Geometry (some corny/joke names in the problems; incremental). BUT... it is a whole lot TOUGHER than Jacobs -- much more rigorous, MANY more problems per lesson, much harder/more complex problems, goes WAY into trig topics, many problems have you write computer programs... Frankly, Jacobs feels like a high school program and Foerster feels like a college level course. It's been a stretch for our older "mathy" DS; I often only have him do a quarter of the problems in a lesson, and he still works for an hour. While he enjoyed Jacobs Algebra and Geometry, he's only tolerating the Foerster's. If I had it to do over again, I would have gone with something less rigorous for him.

 

BEST of luck, whatever you go with! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

I agree that Foerster's is quite a bit more intense than Jacobs. We only do the odds mostly (that eliminates half of the problems) and I don't deal with the computer program problems. Do you have the TM? Mr. Foerster himself only recommends that students do a fraction of the problems.

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I agree that Foerster's is quite a bit more intense than Jacobs. We only do the odds mostly (that eliminates half of the problems) and I don't deal with the computer program problems. Do you have the TM? Mr. Foerster himself only recommends that students do a fraction of the problems.

 

 

No, just the textbook; not even the computer CD to try and do the computer programming problems. :( Fortunately, DS is not at all interested in math/science fields, so this was just a personal challenge for him, since he's always been good with math. :)

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No, just the textbook; not even the computer CD to try and do the computer programming problems. :( Fortunately, DS is not at all interested in math/science fields, so this was just a personal challenge for him, since he's always been good with math. :)

 

What's weird is that the textbook keeps referring to a CD that came with it, but there isn't a CD (and I got everything from the publisher). I think I would have freaked out without the TM telling me that half (or fewer) of the problems was an adequate assignment. There are *a lot* of problems!

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