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Ravin

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Ravin last won the day on October 20 2016

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About Ravin

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    Hive Mind Queen Bee

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    del_pozo_attwood@hotmail.com
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    Here and There
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    SCA, writing
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    attorney

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    Here and There
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    Writing, Historical Costuming, Minecraft

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  1. I missed posting Week 11, but I've finished a fair bit of reading! My overall reading goals are to take in a mix of fiction and nonfiction, spiritually enriching, informative, and fun selections; to keep up with the Druid book discussion/study group I'm in, to put eyes on words not related directly to work more often than last year, and to read books that I bought ages ago and still haven't read. My currently reading list: The Broken Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin on Audible. I have 7 hours and 5 minutes left. Just under halfway through the book The Táin translated by Ciaran Carson Update: no progress. In my defense, the whole book study group I'm reading it with has been on temporary hiatus because of work and stuff. Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson (this is one of those "bought ages ago and still haven't read" books) Reading on Kindle. I haven't made progress on this one in the last couple of weeks. George Carlin Reads to You by George Carlin. Still only listening when riding in the car with my co-worker. There's 31 minutes left on the audiobook. Next Up: I still feel like I need to finish some more of my current reading list before I go looking for more, but the following have been added to my "want to read" list: The Uninhabitable Earth by Davis Wallace-Wells (This will fit the "science" category of my 10x10 challenge). Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport My 10x10 challenge categories: 1. humor Tough Sh*t definitely qualified! 2. science (nonfiction) 3. fantasy & science fiction by new-to-me authors (Thank you to those who made suggestions, I'll be going back to refer to them later!) 4. LGBT 5. classic fiction 6. folklore (The Táin will satisfy this) 7. religion (nonfiction) (Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson will satisfy this) 8. law (nonfiction) 9. modern fiction in translation (i.e., originally published in a language other than English) 10. books by women of color (Stone Sky met this requirement) The books must of course all be separate selections, though they may fit into more than one category, they cannot be used for more than one, so that I read 10 books for it. Books I've read for the 52 books in 52 weeks challenge this year (most recently completed first): 6. Tough Sh*t: Life Advice from a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good by Kevin Smith (on audiobook, read by the author). Started this one AND finished it last week. 5. The Stand (unabridged) by Stephen King (on audiobook). Finished last week! 4. Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor Finished since my last post! 3. American Like Me by America Ferrera. 2. The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin (third book in the Broken Earth series) 1. The Sky-Blue Wolves by S. M. Stirling
  2. The thing that's helped my son the most with this was the unit they did in PACE (what they call the gifted program at his school) on growth mindset. The idea is that the focus for accomplishment should be on effort, not on assumptions of inborn talent. This helps with the quitting tendency in perfectionism. DS will get very frustrated, cry, but still persist and keep trying because he has really taken this mindset to heart. I've seen it in the way he approaches things he finds difficult.
  3. Yes. DS already isn't "clean cut" as he has only had 2 haircuts his entire life, the last one over a year and a half ago. I doubt he'll ask any time soon, though. He gets annoyed enough that people think he's a girl because of his long hair!
  4. I personally would like to see Algebra 1, Geometry, Consumer Math, and Statistics as the required standard 4-year run for diploma requirements for high school math. Students on a STEM track can take Algebra 2 after taking Algebra 1 in 8th grade, and could make room for Pre-Calculus if Consumer Math and Statistics were offered in condensed format of 1 semester each for accelerated/strong math students. Of course, I also think the maths required in college should have more bearing on the degree track the student is pursuing.
  5. Now I want Tim-Tams, and all I have are Girl Scout cookies.🙎‍♂️
  6. I learn new things about history all the time. Most of what I learned in school was little better than whitewashed campaigns for why this country is "great." Concerning the Civil Rights movement, I recently learned about Bayard Rustin, whom I had never heard of at all, from this podcast: https://www.historyisgaypodcast.com/listen
  7. Talk therapy is an important step in dealing with gender issues and sorting out whether transition is the way to go, and what that should look like, and how to handle the problems that come up in the process, including stigma, etc. The key is finding a therapist who knows their stuff.
  8. It really depends on what markers they are looking at, and how exclusive and historically deep those markers can be traced to a geographic location to establish ancestry. The reality is that while many people in Europe stayed put, quite a few didn't, and the more data is gathered, the more they are finding that various historical events had greater genomic impacts (i.e., resulted in more intermixture of populations) than previously thought. One example I came across recently: https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/ancestry/irish-viking-norman-dna It could be that some of those actually-Norwegian markers are in the database on which your DNA profile was analyzed as indicating British Isles ancestry. Or, it could be that your great-grandfather was adopted. Or they may have come to the U.S. from Norway, but may have migrated to Norway from somewhere else first. There are a lot of possibilities. I would probably get analyses from a couple of other companies, to compare. Often they analyze different markers and have different aggregate data sets for comparison, so your results could be significantly different.
  9. My overall reading goals are to take in a mix of fiction and nonfiction, spiritually enriching, informative, and fun selections; to keep up with the Druid book discussion/study group I'm in, to put eyes on words not related directly to work more often than last year, and to read books that I bought ages ago and still haven't read. My currently reading list: The Stand (unabridged) by Stephen King (on audiobook; it's over 48 hours long, so this will definitely take me more than a week, as I listen to audiobooks on my commute and when driving for work, about 6-10 hours a week). Update: I'm now on Chapter 72, with just 48 minutes left on the audio book! Looks like I'll finish this week! The Táin translated by Ciaran Carson Update: I've finished through chapter seven. I'm reading the end-notes as I go, too. Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson (this is one of those "bought ages ago and still haven't read" books) Reading on Kindle. I haven't made progress on this one in the last couple of weeks. Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor Almost done with Chapter 30, 93% done with the book. George Carlin Reads to You by George Carlin. Started this one riding in the car with my co-worker. There's 3 hours and 25 minutes left on the audiobook. It's possible I'll finish this one if my coworker and I carpool to court again. Next Up: I think I have one of Kamala Harris' books on hold from the library on audiobook. I picked up The Broken Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin on Audible (not available on audiobook from my local library). I still feel like I need to finish some more of my current reading list before I go looking for more, but the following have been added to my "want to read" list: The Uninhabitable Earth by Davis Wallace-Wells (This will fit the "science" category of my 10x10 challenge). Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport My 10x10 challenge categories: 1. humor 2. science (nonfiction) 3. fantasy & science fiction by new-to-me authors (Thank you to those who made suggestions, I'll be going back to refer to them later!) 4. LGBT 5. classic fiction 6. folklore (The Táin will satisfy this) 7. religion (nonfiction) (Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson will satisfy this) 8. law (nonfiction) 9. modern fiction in translation (i.e., originally published in a language other than English) 10. books by women of color (Stone Sky met this requirement) The books must of course all be separate selections, though they may fit into more than one category, they cannot be used for more than one, so that I read 10 books for it. Books I've read for the 52 books in 52 weeks challenge this year (most recently completed first): 3. American Like Me by America Ferrera. 2. The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin (third book in the Broken Earth series) I heard a great Science Friday talk with the author about this series last week! FEBRUARY 27, 2019SciFri Extra: A Night Of Volcanoes And Earthquakes With N.K. Jemisin (Scroll down the podcast's page to the date find it). 1. The Sky-Blue Wolves by S. M. Stirling
  10. What I particularly have in mind are both criminal justice statistics I learned about in law school, and specific examples I have seen reading police reports and hearing accounts from clients and their families. The statistics show that people of color are more likely to 1. be stopped/have police called on them in the first place, 2. be ticketed rather than warned, be arrested rather than ticketed, all other things being equal, 3. be seen/treated as dangerous, again, all other things being equal, which can lead to escalation of situations between them and police, 4. tend to be treated more harshly in prosecution, get less favorable plea deals, and be treated more harshly in sentencing for the same offenses under otherwise similar circumstances. In many of the circumstances where I have seen clients charged with assault or battery on a Peace Officer, the situation tends to start with them asking a simple question like, "why are you arresting me?" which is seen by the (inadequately trained, spread too thin, and in many cases I suspect overly sensitized to the point of PTSD, or else extremely wet behind the ears) officer as resisting arrest. They then quickly escalate to efforts to physically control/handcuff the person, taze them, etc. often when they are disoriented (ex: woken from sleep by officer standing over their bed) even if not impaired by alcohol/drugs. The slightest resistance or any move which may result in physical contact (including one incident where the officer TAZED HIMSELF, others where the officer tripped/fell on the person they were arresting, or the officer overbalanced, fell, and pulled the person down on top of the officer, the client's version of events backed up by witnesses, usually whoever called police in the first place) is quickly used against the person to charge them with Battery on a Peace Officer, which is one of the few mandatory-jail, no probation eligible offenses in the jurisdiction. I have taken to advising clients that if they find themselves in similar circumstances in future, to just go quietly and save questions for later. I let them know that there are other ways to address it if their rights are violated. I have also seen the FBI come in and question a client about an officer's assault on him (which resulted in injuries) in violation of his civil rights, with the actual purpose of getting the client to an easy spot to arrest him on a Federal warrant for assaulting the officer. Particular officers I have noticed have a track record of going into situations, without any report that a person is armed and even when talking to the person who called them in the first place, with baton or taser in hand. After reading at least one recent report, I had to tell the client he was lucky to be alive, because under the circumstances, if it had been a different officer, or if that officer hadn't happened to already have his taser in hand, the client or his girlfriend (both of whom were hit when the officer tased him) could well have been shot, maybe killed. Clients with health issues often aren't listened to about them by officers (police or corrections). Clients with disabilities, or in mental health crisis, the police here have zero training and often little experience in how to handle these things, or in de-escalation of crisis situations. What ongoing training they get is usually focused on the Federal DOJ's pet grant-funded training of the year (school shooting, human trafficking, etc.), rather than on the things that are actual common issues those officers deal with (Domestic violence, alcohol, drugs, suicide attempts). As I put to new officers I was introduced to, my job is to help make sure they do their job the right way. It's not that I'm anti-police. They have a necessary job to do. It's just often they are trying to do it with too few people, too little training, too little sleep, and after seeing too many people at their worst and seeing or experiencing trauma themselves, resulting in too little concern for the well-being of the people they are interacting with (and I don't just mean the people they decide to arrest).
  11. My line of work admittedly colors my perceptions...though my line of work is also in part chosen because of my perceptions and experience before law school. 1. One of the most mistrustful of government in general people I know was a Federal agent for an agency (not naming it, not the FBI) and a police officer before that. More than half his working life was spent in public service. 2. Privilege matters in how you deal with police/CPS. The less likely you are to be capable to lawyer up at a point in proceedings before you have a right to appointed counsel, the more likely you are to need that help. Corollary to this is that Money is power. This in in part because you can hire lawyers when you are wealthy in situations where middle class and poor people must fend for themselves, regardless of race. 3. Race, disability, LGBTQ+ status, religion, etc. also matter. Sometimes, surviving an immediate situation may require making your rights a secondary consideration in the moment, especially if you lack privilege. That is a flaw in our justice system.
  12. I got really busy and missed the thread for week eight. Phooey. My overall reading goals are to take in a mix of fiction and nonfiction, spiritually enriching, informative, and fun selections; to keep up with the Druid book discussion/study group I'm in, to put eyes on words not related directly to work more often than last year, and to read books that I bought ages ago and still haven't read. My currently reading list: The Stand (unabridged) by Stephen King (on audiobook; it's over 48 hours long, so this will definitely take me more than a week, as I listen to audiobooks on my commute and when driving for work, about 6-10 hours a week). Update: I'm now on Chapter 59, with 10 hours left on the audio book. The Táin translated by Ciaran Carson Update: I've finished through chapter seven. I'm reading the end-notes as I go, too. Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson (this is one of those "bought ages ago and still haven't read" books) Reading on Kindle. I haven't made progress on this one in the last couple of weeks. Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor On Chapter 30. George Carlin Reads to You by George Carlin. Started this one riding in the car with my co-worker. There's 3 hours and 25 minutes left on the audiobook. Next Up: I think I have one of Kamala Harris' books on hold from the library on audiobook. I picked up The Broken Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin on Audible (not available on audiobook from my local library). I still feel like I need to finish some more of my current reading list before I go looking for more, but the following have been added to my "want to read" list: The Uninhabitable Earth by Davis Wallace-Wells (This will fit the "science" category of my 10x10 challenge). Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport My 10x10 challenge categories: 1. humor 2. science (nonfiction) 3. fantasy & science fiction by new-to-me authors (Thank you to those who made suggestions, I'll be going back to refer to them later!) 4. LGBT 5. classic fiction 6. folklore (The Táin will satisfy this) 7. religion (nonfiction) (Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson will satisfy this) 8. law (nonfiction) 9. modern fiction in translation (i.e., originally published in a language other than English) 10. books by women of color (Stone Sky met this requirement) The books must of course all be separate selections, though they may fit into more than one category, they cannot be used for more than one, so that I read 10 books for it.
  13. Sounds like he's trying to cut off his nose to spite his face. Your attorney sounds awesome and very astute about the interpersonal stuff! I hope he doesn't fire his current attorney and she can manage him into a reasonable settlement soon. You definitely deserve to be shut of this mess without shortchanging yourself!
  14. Colleges and universities have little incentive to reduce student debt. Many states have for the last few decades been starving higher education of state funds in order to spend it elsewhere and/or cut taxes, while Federal financial aid has filled the gap for rising costs for most students largely through loans rather than grants. The whole system is rigged to disproportionately shift the burden for having an educated populace/workforce which society needs onto the students, who pay a disproportionate and skyrocketing amount for their education, especially including interest lining the pockets of loan servicers. Those industries which are demanding degrees to get jobs that didn't used to need degrees, or who expect people to become debt paupers to gain the qualifications then pay them salaries that do not take into account the need to pay those loans, should probably be paying taxes to help fund higher education.
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