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Can somebody please tell me which chapters can be skipped in this book and which ones are a must? I have 6th edition. I know some are supposed to be Chem related, but I can’t figure out how with any confidence what to cover and what to skip. 😳

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Going by this TOC:http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_giancoli_physicsppa_6/0,8713,1113739--t,00.html

 

For a two semester course:

 

1st semester mechanics and brief thermo (only 1-2 weeks max)

ch 1-9 thoroughly. Basis of mechanics

ch 10-12 as overview (fluids, vibrations, and waves). Go a bit deeper in vibrations, skim sound

 

Thermo:

ch. 13 probably done in chemistry.

ch 14 might be done in chem.

ch. 15 as a survey. will also be done in chem

 

2nd semester E&M:

ch 16-24 thoroughly, skim ch 25

 

If you only have 2 semesters, I would prefer to teach mechanics and e&m thoroughly and skip modern physics (ch 26-33)

If you have three semesters or a student interested in physics, I would cover these in a separate semester, but not at the expense of the earlier stuff

Edited by regentrude
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Yes, that's the textbook! 

Thank you Regentrude.  Modern physics is his favorite part. Luckily I have three semesters, so it looks like we will just omit 13,14,15. :) 

 

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We used an older edition, but the chapter titles are identical to those in the TOC linked by regentrude.

 

By the end of December, we'd covered mechanics Chapters 1 through 9 VERY thoroughly.

 

 

The rest of the year (through May) we did Chapters 10 through 24.

 

Then he just read through Chapters 25, 27, 30, 31 (no problems assigned) & prepped for the SAT 2 test.

 

Pretty much what regentrude said. :laugh:

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We used an older edition, but the chapter titles are identical to those in the TOC linked by regentrude.

 

By the end of December, we'd covered mechanics Chapters 1 through 9 VERY thoroughly.

 

 

The rest of the year (through May) we did Chapters 10 through 24.

 

Then he just read through Chapters 25, 27, 30, 31 (no problems assigned) & prepped for the SAT 2 test.

 

Pretty much what regentrude said. :laugh:

Does very thoroughly mean solving every problem at the end of the chapter, or would it be enough to solve just level 2 problems and maybe a sample of level 3? Level 1 seems really easy. He will eventually do calculus based physics and has already completed conceptual course with some algebra. I know it’s the same material over and over, but he is a bit obsessed with physics.

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Does very thoroughly mean solving every problem at the end of the chapter, or would it be enough to solve just level 2 problems and maybe a sample of level 3? Level 1 seems really easy. He will eventually do calculus based physics and has already completed conceptual course with some algebra. I know it’s the same material over and over, but he is a bit obsessed with physics.No

 

No - not every single problem - just meant that I made sure that he was solid on these topics.

It was a first physics course here, but ds had read a lot on his own informally before that year. Then he took calc based physics the following year using Resnick & Halliday.

 

For example, in the linear momentum chapter, it looks like I assigned all the odd numbered problems. Most of them were level 2, but there were a few level 1 and level 3 problems mixed in. So in total about 30 problems assigned over a 2 week period. He took a quiz (from Giancoli's online website) at the end of each chapter as a check, and he reviewed the whole book for the SAT 2 exam at the end of the year.

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One more question, please.

The end of chapter has three sections: questions, problems, and general problems. Should questions and general problems sections be covered in their entirety or should I also just do a sample of questions from there as I am doing with the “problems†section?

I know those are stupid questions, but I am swimming blind in physics.

Edited by Roadrunner

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These are not stupid questions. I don't have this Giancoli text, but I have his other one. Its like any other text and has a large assortment of problems so instructors can customize.

I assign 5-8 worked out problems (depending on difficulty and number of sub-parts) per week in my algebra based physics class. I have not seen a big distinction between "problems" and "general problems" - only that the latter are not sorted by section, and may contain a few more challenging problems.

From the conceptual questions, I choose a few to work into class discussion.

 

ETA: If you have no physics expertise, I recommend finding a syllabus for a class that uses this text and use their assignments; the instructor will have put thought into the selection.

Edited by regentrude
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I don't know if it will help, but I found an AP Physics syllabus using the 6th edition Giancoli book.

I also found a high school physics page where the teacher puts the assigned problem #s on the calendar. Click on AP Physics 1, then Calendar, then check for dates with problem numbers & page numbers. AP Physics 2 also uses Giancoli 6th edition.

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I don't know if it will help, but I found an AP Physics syllabus using the 6th edition Giancoli book.

I also found a high school physics page where the teacher puts the assigned problem #s on the calendar. Click on AP Physics 1, then Calendar, then check for dates with problem numbers & page numbers. AP Physics 2 also uses Giancoli 6th edition.

 

Thank helps. 

I was looking for the old AP physics syllabus (before the redesign), but this should work. 

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You may also want to read 

https://www.aip.org/statistics/reports/high-school-physics-textbooks

High School Physics Textbooks
Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers
September 2010
 
Also when you find a syllabus you like down load it and save it - it may be gone the next week!
 
Are you looking for AP Physics B Syllabi that used the Giancoli 6th?
There may be a few left out there or folks here may have it saved.
 
update:
 AP Physics B Syllabi 
 
you can only print this one- button to the right
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwi4xZDJ54TYAhUH5yYKHTu_BHsQFgg_MAQ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fstudylib.net%2Fdoc%2F10095964%2Fsyllabus--ap-physics-b&usg=AOvVaw1gPxFXJQTD94-fJ1r2o_dM>

 

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Are you looking for AP Physics B Syllabi that used the Giancoli 6th?
There may be few left out there or folks here may have it saved.

 

 

Here's an old AP Physics B syllabus designed by Delores Gendes which is aligned with Giancoli's 5th or 6th edition. I used an earlier version of her planning guide when I taught from that text & found it to be very useful.

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Here's an old AP Physics B syllabus designed by Delores Gendes which is aligned with Giancoli's 5th or 6th edition. I used an earlier version of her planning guide when I taught from that text & found it to be very useful.

This one tells me exactly what to do. I needed this! 😋

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