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Julpost

Why does my bread fall flat in the oven????

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Good thing the kids still like it. However I would like to discover the secret to a nice, high, rounded loaf top. Any help??? I use freshly ground wheat and some extra gluten.

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It could be that your aren't kneading the dough enough. Do you hand knead or use a bosch/mixer?

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Or the yeast is old/dead or you over-proofed it and it just couldn't hold up long enough to bake. Or your pans are too big for the recipe - I have a recipe from a cookbook that I like, BUT although the book says to use 9x5 pans, I have to use 8x4 or I have un-domed, flat-looking loaves.

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You may also be letting your loaves raise too long. Then, when you move them they flatten out. If you are using active dry yeast you may only need to let it raise 45 minutes.

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I'm not sure if I'm kneading them long enough, so I just started a new dough and set the timer to make sure I get at least 8 minutes in. I use both a KitchenAid mixer and hand-kneading. I added extra gluten and we'll see. If it still falls, I'll try the next idea. I'll let you know what works! :)

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Sometimes the flour is so heavy it falls after a certain point, especially if using whole wheat flour. You might try using a blend of more than one type of flour. If you didn't proof the yeast, you may want to do that with a pinch in a small container of water to see if it is active.

 

I also agree that it may have something to do with letting your dough rise too long and/or the size of the pan vs. the amount of dough you are using for each loaf. I bet if you proof the yeast, switch to a less heavy blend of flour, use a slightly smaller pan and watch the rising carefully you may have more success.

 

There is a real science to bread making and just when you think you have it figured out, you enter a new season of the year with different atmospheric elements in your kitchen and you have to then calculate all that in too. Its so worth it though.

 

Happy baking!

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

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So, you put it into warm (not hot) water with a little sugar, and leave it for 15 minutes, and you see foaming bubbles on the top of the mixture.

 

Do you have the Laurel's Kitchen Bread Book? In "A Loaf For Learning" it describes in detail how to use a finger poke to figure out whether a dough loaf has risen enough, not enough, or too much; and telling what to do about it in each case. Also, they recommend using three rises rather than the two that you normally use for white bread, and I have found that that makes a big difference in oven spring which is what you're after.

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library, but don't own it. Maybe I should :D I'm not the op - I do use spring wheat but mixed w/hard red winter, about half and half. So I'm guessing this would still apply?

 

Also, Carol, I refrigerate my yeast once it's opened from the vacuum pack. Is this good? Thanks!

 

OP - how did your bread turn out the last time?

 

Thanks!

Cheryl

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