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freelylearned

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About freelylearned

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    Hive Mind Level 3 Worker: Honeymaking Bee

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  • Website URL
    http://www.freelylearned.com
  • Location
    California's Central Valley
  • Occupation
    Homeschool Momma

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    Books
    Travel
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    Nature
  1. I make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and freeze them. They thaw beautifully and don't get soggy. I've only made two weeks worth at a time. They are so easy to grab and toss in a cooler with drinks, apples, yogurts, etc... Cold pasta salads with chicken, cheese, olives, and veggies are good for lunches, too.
  2. freelylearned

    Classes that meet once per week?

    Duolingo has a schools site that you can set up a classroom for outside practice. It's a good way to keep up with your student's progress.
  3. If she likes the treadmill, there's nothing wrong with letting her be on the treadmill for PE. You could always throw in a challenge her and there by signing up for a family fun run or even a short trail run. A race would get her out of her head and into the action, for sure! My son is a lot like your daughter he'd rather read or write stories or play legos or draw or play video games than do anything that requires him to sweat. We found our happy spot with bike riding. He happily rides at least 20 minutes a day and my husband takes him out on longer rides, with hills, on the weekends. To add strength, I have him do sit ups and push ups a few times a week or we walk to our neighborhood park which has a fitness course and we do a few stations and run up the hills a few times while my younger kids play. Once in a while, we play basketball or throw a frisbee or hit a baseball just so he has some experience with the "coordinated" sports. The best PE program is the one that gets done!
  4. I've worked at enough California high schools to know that there may be a wee bit of misinformation on this thread. You probably want to set up an appointment to see the counselor or administrator of your charter school to see how that particular charter school makes sure their students are meeting the A-G requirements. They may allow you to write your own course description, they may not. They may allow Christian materials if you prove they meet the same standards as their courses, they may not. You won't find out on this board; you have to ask the school itself. Also a nice thing about the UC system is that they arrange contracts with students through junior colleges. I know a lot of students who graduated high school, enrolled in JC, set up a contract with UC Davis or UC Berkely or one of the many CSUs in California, hit their grade and course goals and two years later went to the UC they handpicked without jumping through the hoops California high school students have to in order to go to the same school. It's a lot less stress too. It's worth talking to your local JC counselor too. I use a California charter school and every year I fill out forms to get approval for the alternate curriculum that I buy with my own funds. I just have to show that they meet the same academic standards. The law does not prohibit California homeschoolers from using Christian curriculum, we just can't use tax money to buy it. I can even turn in a work sample from a Christian curriculum...even if it quotes a Bible verse. Not all charters would accept that. Some schools prefer to hold up the separation of church and state and some hold up our right to freedom of religion. ETA: I guess I should mention that my oldest is in 6th grade and I don't plan to use our charter for high school mainly because I don't like the online classes that they require students to enroll in. I will probably go independent at that point and I don't care about A-G. I've been researching Master's programs for myself and its cheaper to pay out of state tuition for an online program than to pay the tuition for a state university in California while I am living in California. It's ridiculous.
  5. freelylearned

    Writing & Rhetoric

    If I were putting a 5th and 7th grader together, I would put them in either books 3, 4, or 5. One of the benefits of putting you kids in the same book is that there is a discussion section in each lesson. If you put your kids together, you could do the discussion as a group, instead of just one on one. There's a public speaking section at the end that they could do together, too. I tend to skip the speaking section because I have just one kid in W&R. My son spends 20-25 minutes a day on W&R. The first day he does his reading and narrates to me. The second day he does the questions on the reading and I choose a couple of discussion questions for us to talk about. The third day he does the shorter writing time exercises. The fourth day he starts the longer writing exercise and we sometimes take a fifth day to finish it. Once a month he chooses on of his longer assignments to revise and type.
  6. freelylearned

    What is the best secular geography?

    Too bad you can't use MP, our charter lets us use funds for a lot of MPs language arts and history materials because they are neutral. You can try Trail Guide to World Geography. It didn't strike me as a Christian geography program, but is from a Christian company, so your charter may blackball it. Uncle Josh's Outline maps has really good blank maps. It isn't a bad idea to invest some of that money in a really nice children's atlas.
  7. freelylearned

    Spanish for a 5 year old

    Song School Spanish from Classical Academic Press is pretty good for that age too. It comes with a cd and an activity book.
  8. freelylearned

    Channeling the need to build/ create

    I like the volunteering idea. She could make gifts for the children's section of a local hospital. A local charity I know of takes donations of old sheets or shirts and people repurpose the cloth to make quilts and donate them to the local police. Each officer has clean blankets in thier patrol cars to give to children during accidents. She could do flower arranging...because when the flowers wilt, you can throw them away...
  9. Singapore is a little ahead of other programs, so it's OK to be a little behind. When we started homeschooling my son was a half year behind in math because his public school switched programs midyear to adopt a Common Core aligned program. He ended up doing the first half of third grade math twice that year. We started Singapore a half year behind. This year (6th grade) we completed 5B and 6A, and we are right on track to finish 6B sometime in May. 6A and 6B are pretty short and can easily be completed in a semester. (I heard year 6 is a testing year in Singapore, which accounts for the shortness of the books. Short books leave a lot of time for review) 6A and 6B cover a lot of pre algebra topics, so even if we were still behind in the Singapore sequence, we wouldn't really be behind by US standards.
  10. freelylearned

    Please remind me school doesn't always have to be fun....

    I think it would be hard to keep up the fun all the way through high school. It seems more appropriate to give high school students an education that is interesting and challenging and middle school is a good time to transition from fun to engaging. There are a lot of good suggestions above for adding interest to the curriculum. Charlotte Mason-style short, yet challenging lessons in academic subjects may free up time for ongoing academic projects that really engage your kids' skills and creativity. "Engaged" in the upper grades is the equivalent of "having fun" in the lower grades. On the flip side, if your kids are getting boxes checked early in the day so they can pursue outside interests, that shows responsibility, organization, work ethic, and initiative! I don't think that's so bad.
  11. In the Al Capone Does My Shirts series by Gennifer Choldenko, the main character's sister has severe autism, I believe.
  12. freelylearned

    If you read "The Smartest Kids in the World"

    The Smartest Kids in the World and The Knowledge Gap by ED Hirsch gave me the confidence at the beginning of my homeschooling years to trust my gut and strike out on a path that was very different from the American norm. Am I fascinated by Finland's school system? Yes, yes I am.
  13. freelylearned

    Curriculum Sales

    ChristianBook.com gives discounts of 30-35% off of a lot of curriculum at least once during the year. You just have to check weekly for sales. Also, see if you local homeschool group does a used curriculum sale...that's where the best deals are! PS We enjoyed REAL Science Odyssey a lot. If I had to go back, I would buy the eBook because it was really hard to make copies out of the book or to even pull pages out because the binding was really tough and inflexible.
  14. I use Weebly for my blog. It's super easy. Everything is drag and drop. The phone app is good, too. You can even set up a teacher account for free and add on student accounts.
  15. My daughter has an ST Math subscription through our charter school, and sometimes I'll look at what she's playing and wonder something like, "Do I even need to teach subtraction now because she seems to get the concept."
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