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MamaSprout

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About MamaSprout

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    Ohio
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    Tutor

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  1. ALEKS.com has integrated math and would do what you need.
  2. If you buy/ rent one of the current editions of the Larson books, CalChat.com offers tutoring and has step-by-step videos for the odd numbered questions in the books. Our edition is too old for that, but it's nice to know it's available.
  3. Have your dd look at the videos for both. My dd thinks Edward Berger is a goof ball, so it was a non-option for us. Besides, we really need a textbook. If you can help her through Doliciani Algebra 2, I think you could keep up with Larson/ Chalkdust Precalculus. I know Wilson Hill follows what you used for Alg 2 with Larson Precalculus. If cost is an issue and you don't find a used Chalkdust set, Cool Math Guy is also Dana Mosely. The precalculus book appears to be different edition, so you'd need to choose your own assignments, but maybe you've already done that with Dolciani? Larson Precalculus is free and lines up with several editions (and sometimes the previous edition to a listed one matches fine, too), but the videos are shorter topic-based segments.
  4. Correct- without buying another book. ETA- I’m glad we are discussing something that is not an outsourced class, which I think happens a lot this time of year. I hope there can be thoughts on how to use it rather than tearing down the specifics.
  5. I didn’t look closely at the examples. Most student writing makes me cringe. That’s why I like the idea of it: students look at and work with good writing without adding another piece of curriculum to the line up. It doesn’t need to come from the NYT.
  6. I think it's just the way one teacher teaches her high school classes. It might be similar to the Writing Revolution. It's actually very similar to some of the earlier assignments in most classical writing programs, too, where they work with a fable and re-write with different focus (p.o.v., etc). I've done pieces and parts of this, but my dd "gets" it laid out in an article this way and is excited to jump in with a biography she just finished.
  7. I saw this today. It looks like a great approach to “writing across the curriculum”. You could do this with news, great books, fiction, biographies... anything really. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/06/learning/teaching-great-writing-one-sentence-at-a-time.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ln_20190307&nl=learning-network&nl_art=1&nlid=85426744emc%3Dedit_ln_20190307&ref=headline&te=1
  8. We like and are using the England in Literature book this year. I recommend the series. ETA- How to Mark a Book (Adler): https://laurencelibrary.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/how-to-mark-a-book-ma.pdf
  9. I don't know, but if you find a secular homeschool friendly GB resources let me know... they are not abundant. Have you considered doing the Sonlight 500 spread out over 2 years? The first half is Lively Art of Writing, which is a very accessible writing text for early high school.
  10. I've read it. I remember being hung up on Don Quixote when I tried to apply it to myself. Maybe I'll look at the newer edition. I had a set of WTM-based questions for elementary that applied to any book. Maybe I'll revisit that idea for high school. I really want to keep things simple. I get a case of "add-one-more-thing" when I dive into the WTM, but may just one section will be okay. 🙂
  11. Thanks Lori. The comprehension questions look very useful... I'm using GoDuckGo for my search engine, and while I like that I'm not tracked, I definitely did not turn these up even using the terms you gave me. I might need to rethink using it.
  12. We need lightweight reading/ comprehension checks for literature next year. We're using this https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/literature/21l-001-foundations-of-western-culture-homer-to-dante-fall-2008/readings/ Dd likes the books and I like the writing assignments and will use them, but dd needs something to keep her focused while she's reading. I need either a process or a set of lightweight "fact-checky-without-being-stupidly-detailed" questions. I can discuss these books, but I've taught most of them before and know things will go better with a reading scaffold of some sort. I've looked at a lot of the usual suspects, and I really don't want to spend $20/ book for full-fledged literature guides. I really just need questions to keep dd's reading on task. I've thought about a commonplace book, but don't want it to be busywork. Anyone have any suggestions? Teacher's files they've come across? Thanks!
  13. We did it and it went fine. We got to Week 23 where it basically turns into applying what you've learned and decided to write across the curriculum.
  14. I think we're on the tail end of this. 7th was terrible. 8th has been a steady improvement. Our youngest dd had the worst acne of any of my kids, and definitely the worst transition through puberty. I'm hopeful for high school.
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