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wingedradical

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About wingedradical

  • Rank
    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee
  • Birthday 05/31/1952

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Arizona
  • Interests
    Books, maps, music, Christianity, gardening.
  1. I know it isn't popular on this website (many think there isn't enough practice) but I have a friend who has a son who sounds like yours and he has done well with Life Of Fred. The chapters and assignments are short but when I looked through it, I thought it looked well explained. All the math problems are incorporated into the life of Fred, a 5 year old genius professor at KITTENS University in Kansas. If you don't use it, just reading it is a kick. After doing Lial for several year (my foster daughter IS a math person) and finishing calculus earlier this year, we have now started in Statistics. But we decided to take it easy and we are just doing Life of Fred Stats. It's a hoot.
  2. Would you spay a pregnant cat? Absolutely not!!!! (but I might pay a vet to do it if s/he thought it was medically necessary) Can Apraxia effect how my son writes his letters? Well, let's try a similar example for comparison. Can deafness affect how my son hears music? Well, then, there ya go!
  3. I'm just quoting the person on the phone. To their credit, by "real lab" I did not get the impression that they meant it had to be a fully equipped lab - they were talking to me, a homeschooler, and they were trying to be helpful; I did not feel they were being obstructionist. I got the impression they just meant it wouldn't do to do a few experiments with measuring cups and spoons and call it the equivalent to being able to identify a beaker or Erlenmyer flask and that we should use some chemicals besides those easily available in the kitchen. Is that fair? Well, if you have a really well designed kitchen chemistry program, maybe not. And maybe they will accept it if you explain it well enough. My impression was just that they wanted students to be comfortable about what lab equipment consisted of, how to measure, how to be safe and how to record before they allowed them in the lab there. As for whether every school in AZ has a fully equipped lab -- I don't know. I doubt it. The high schools in Tucson and Phoenix and their suburbs that I've seen have good ones. Whether every little district out in the desert or school on all Native Lands do, I very much doubt it.
  4. Just note that some colleges (those in the Arizona system, for example) require the name of your chemistry curriculum, make you fill out an example of a lab report and ask quite a few other questions to decide whether your chemistry homeschool class qualifies you to actually enter college chemistry. Arizona is otherwise homeschool friendly, so I suspect the chemistry department has been burned. So if you want it for credit, I'd be sure what the requirements are at any school your child might consider.
  5. Just note that some colleges (those in the Arizona system, for example) require the name of your chemistry curriculum, make you fill out an example of a lab report and ask quite a few other questions to decide whether your chemistry homeschool class qualifies you to actually enter college chemistry. Arizona is otherwise homeschool friendly, so I suspect the chemistry department has been burned. So if you want it for credit, I'd be sure what the requirements are at any school your child might consider.
  6. Safeway is expensive imo. I shop at Sprouts (do you have one nearby?) and sometimes, Fry's. Occasionally, Bashas', since it is local business. I only to to TJ's once in a while. Too many things there I can't resist that have wheat and sugar.
  7. I haven't used this since DH and I are fluent in Spanish, but I wonder if it might be a good answer for some homeschoolers: www.languageconvo.com From what I understand, it works this way: You pay $10/hour for lessons. You take your lesson over Skype, using video cams. The teachers are native speakers and work from an American book, although I can't remember which one. They will also work with a different book, if you so chose and if you buy them a copy of it.. Students do writing, listening and memory assignments between Skype lessons and the teacher tries to give a maximum of actual practice.. You can have as many hours a week as you want (always the same teacher) as long as you are willing pay $10/hr for each lesson.. The disadvantage "might" be that your child would end up with a bit of a Central American accent and learn Central American idioms since it is based out of El Salvador. But no matter where you learn Spanish, you will need to adjust for the country you live in so that isn't really an issue. Being based in El Salvador is what makes it fairly inexpensive, though -- you are only paying $10 for an hour but the tutor is being paid well by Salvadoran standards.
  8. Wow! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! After other research, which I could have gotten in one place had I come here first, :banghead: I am thinking of either Spectrum or Zumdahl along with the Don't Burn the House Down. I do have a question about the Zumdahl option, though. It is late at night and maybe I am just missing it but does the author of Don't Burn the House Down have recommendations for lab glassware and chemicals for the book's labs? I am not a math/science person at all, and like most non-science people, the idea of teaching chemistry scares me. When I homeschooled my oldest, he skipped it and when I homeschooled my youngest, I outsourced it. I can't do either of those at this time. My student is currently finishing up precalc as a sophomore. She has done biology with lab. She wants (and needs) to do chemistry. However, she is a foster child with many problems. I have concerns about teaching a class I don't know well if it is not student directed. I don't want for us to get bogged down in chemistry since she has other non-academic things to work on. So, I've thought maybe a regular class rather than honors or AP would be better for us, all things considered, even though with a knowledgeable teacher, I believe she is very capable of succeeding in a more advanced class. Also .. one other question. I did not take chemistry at all in school but my husband did. We qualify as senior citizens, so this was ages ago, but he said that in his high school chemistry course, the students were always coming up with completely different lab results than the book said and also, different from each other. This was not so true in university, he said. But we are a bit concerned because he does not have time to help and this is just what I need - for every experiment to turn out with confusing results. I feel stupid for asking, (ask me about humanities, I'm really good with those) but is his experience common or did he have dunces in his chemistry class (he was in a prep school, so that doesn't seem likely). But I've not heard anyone here mention it. What do you do if that happens? And does the fact that Spectrum gives you the exact amount of chemical(s) you need for each piece of lab work mean you can't repeat -- and is that therefore an issue with Spectrum? Thanks.
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