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sangtarah

Auditory Processing

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Okay, talk to me about auditory processing, please. Dd9 has always had trouble with comprehending written directions, read alouds, and needs to be walked through her school work with bite-sized instruction from me. She can follow story books somewhat better, but still has confusion often. She has been through vision therapy, and made tons of improvement. So I’m looking into auditory processing. Where does one start? What is the best way to improve this, if it is a contributing factor? What teaching methods work for content & skill subjects? 

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You might try asking your vision therapist if she's aware of an audiologist that can test auditory processing. Not every audiologist tests for Auditory Processing Disorders--some only check hearing, which is different from processing. I'd also suggesting reading what you can about APD, but be aware that there are various types of auditory processing disorder. The first book I read about APD only addressed the type the author was familiar with and it didn't match my child's issues. APD may express itself as difficulty listening with background noise or difficulty distinguishing sounds in words or difficulty distinguishing between similar sounds or something else. How to address APD depends on what type it is. The first level of Barton deals with auditory processing of sounds within words. Barton has a screen before starting it because some people can't distinguish similar sounds and then programs like LiPS may help. A difficulty with background noise might mean locating the child near the teacher and away from outside sounds and including both written instruction to supplement spoken instruction or it might involve special equipment. APD can look like ADD/ADHD in some children, or there may be some co-morbidity that makes it difficult to diagnosis, particularly if one isn't specifically looking for it. 

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9 hours ago, sangtarah said:

Dd9 has always had trouble with comprehending written directions, read alouds, and needs to be walked through her school work with bite-sized instruction from me.

You just described a language disorder. She needs an SLP eval. The SLP can run the TAPS or another APD screening while they're at it, sure. 

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There is a lot that can be said about auditory processing, but the things you describe her having trouble with in your OP are not auditory. In addition to language issues, as PeterPan mentioned, your description suggests the possibility of inattention to me.

We had DS13 tested for what we thought were auditory processing issues. Over about a year of evaluations, he was tested by an audiologist, had an appointment with an ENT, had a speech and language test by an SLP, and ultimately was tested by a neuropsych. In his case, it was not APD, but an unfortunate mix of inattention, executive function issues, low fluid reasoning, and anxiety, most of which was at a low enough level to be recognized by the NP but not low enough to meet most diagnostic criteria (so, for example, he did not end up with an ADHD diagnoses, despite all of that).

What you describe is different that what we saw in DS, but I'm throwing his story out there to say that what looks like auditory processing might not be.

Inattention can cause what you describe. Even if other signs of ADHD are not present. The inattention can be internal, in the brain as part of the thinking process, and not show up as what is typically thought of as an inattentive or easily distracted child. DS, for example, was shown to be able to pay attention to the beginning and end of a list of instructions, but lose attention for the middle sections. The brain can be funny that way.

APD can be a real problem for some, of course!!

But you aren't really describing it here. Maybe there are auditory issues you didn't mention?

It sounds more like a reading issue to me. Students can have problems with comprehension, even if they don't have problems decoding. And some students have hidden problems with decoding that are not realized. What you are describing could be a reading disability.

Has basic hearing been tested by an audiologist (not just the pediatrician)?

 

Edited by Storygirl
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I reread my previous post, and it seems like I am throwing out a lot of possibilities. It's because your OP talks about her trouble with reading, comprehension, following directions, and needing material broken down into small pieces. Those symptoms suggest a reading or language disorder or possibly ADHD, to me.

I'm wondering, when you say that she does a little better with story books, what do you mean? Do you mean picture books, where she can get clues from the pictures?

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On 2/13/2019 at 8:48 AM, Storygirl said:

I reread my previous post, and it seems like I am throwing out a lot of possibilities. It's because your OP talks about her trouble with reading, comprehension, following directions, and needing material broken down into small pieces. Those symptoms suggest a reading or language disorder or possibly ADHD, to me.

I'm wondering, when you say that she does a little better with story books, what do you mean? Do you mean picture books, where she can get clues from the pictures?

 

Hmm, lots to think about. This is all new to me, so I’m not really sure what a language/reading or ADHD look like.

re: the story. Dd tells me it is less confusing for her to listen to or read a story; she seems to follow the general flow of what is happening better. Although she still often stops me when we do read alouds. She thinks directions or facts confuse her more. 

She has not been tested by an audiologist. 

I know excellent SLPs. I just have to convince her primary to give us a referral. 

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