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DesertBlossom

What do after LOE C with a barely 6 year old

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We are actually just starting C, but I am trying to look ahead. She will turn 6 about the time we finish C. She has breezed through LOE A&B and makes me feel like a rockstar of a teacher because she remembers everything. We skip a lot of the games in the books because she just doesn't need that much review. She also is the type who likes to figure out things on her own so I have to be careful about how many words I say lest she think I'm doing the teaching. 😉  She is one who sits down every day writing letters to family members using the stuff she's learned. She loves to write and practice. 

I don't have the manual for D so I don't know how it looks, but I hear a lot of people move to something else. I read other threads that suggested ELTL and RLTL. Just glancing through samples it looks like way more mom participation than she is going to want. I know FLL is not going to be her style either. 

I am okay with something that isn't all-in-one for language arts. But ideally, if it's something where I can give her a bit of instruction, glance over her shoulder now and then, and let her do her thing, we'll both be happier. I love the Pentime books and may use that for handwriting. But I'd need something for phonics review, reading and writing.

What do you do with a bright 6 year old who doesn't think she needs a teacher. :)

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For my kids, I had them read aloud to me each day from appropriate level early readers (Frog and Toad, Little Bear, etc). We do that to build stamina and continue to work on fluency.

I added WWE 1 for my youngest at that point, since she was reading and writing well enough for the copywork. My older two did what is now ELTL A instead of WWE 1. ELTL A covers mostly copywork and oral narration practice. Plus you get time to cuddle on the couch and read stories, poems, and fables.

I wait a bit on spelling. I feel that LOE Foundations does a good job of teaching reading, but for some reason my kids don't seem to be ready to cement the spelling rules learned at that age and need to see them again when they're older. So I've also done AAS levels 2 and 3 after the child is reading fluently (AAS level 1 material has been covered fairly well in LOE A-C).

I add grammar in 2nd grade. I did ELTL with my older two (grammar starts in level B). I think I'm going to do Beowulf with my youngest. 

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I have been using LOC D this year with my 2nd grader . D does not teach many more phonograms, but I do find the rules reinforcement helpful. Silent E rules, making words plural, adding suffixes. There was a lot of practice in these and I thought it was very helpful and definitely reinforced the idea.   I liked how the dictations and some activities were intergrated with the books they were reading. 

The problem came because he needed more reading practice, and the spelling words became a little too difficult so I went to using it for exposure so I could teach the rules, but then realized he was still having trouble with some of the really easy words so I needed to step back and focus on learning words in his grasp. I don’t think I will go back, maybe just pulling a couple of worksheets out.

So for you situation, since she catches on so quick when you get it to end of C she should be reading fairly well. So you want to keep going with phonics/spelling but won’t necessarily need a reading program. Just keep her supplied with lots of books and have her read everyday.  So for phonics I have been using MCP Plaid phonics and I think that would be great for you. It is a worksheet a day that teaches/practices a phonics rule. Little instruction and off she goes. There is lots in there , in my younger days I would have seen it as busy work but I’m coming to learn the value of writing to learn writing😜.  But even so there maybe too much practice in there for you , you could skip pages along the way.   The method is a hair different than loe in the way it deals with long vowels, so On those pages I would just reinforce the phonograms not reading their little blurb that the “first vowel says it’s long sound” Over all I found it useful for spelling/phonics practice. We started MCP B while he was in LOE C and he is in C now and 1/2 way through LoE D The online samples don’t give very good overview of exercises , but they are VERY varied. 

SWR is a really good follow up to LOE for spelling because it uses the same phonograms and rules, (if you like the rules ) I always found it difficult to go to a traditional program after learning the rules.   I actually like swr’s rule phrasing better.  SWR can require a bit from the teacher but seems like less than AAS and it seems more efficient when she won’t need a lot of work there.  I agree that you can wait on spelling , but it’s good to have something to keep the skill fresh in the mean time 

Anyway After loe C if she was pretty fluent I would have her read every day, and phonics page out of MCP and later when you feel the need and have the space start spelling with swr. (Though it you wait too long she may forget the phonograms)

At 6 with a child who writes a lot in her own you really don’t need to start a program yet. Keep encouraging the writing and maybe doing copywork/dictation to teach the mechanics. If you need a guide for that maybe WWE, or there are others I haven’t used....

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I strongly recommend that you complete LOE Foundations through D. The final book is very different from A-C; it offers new aspects such as paired texts, reading comprehension, and a stronger focus on grammar. I do agree with PP that the spelling later on was a bit much... I believe we largely dropped it. 

After Foundations is complete you could move on any middle-grade Language Arts program. We have been enjoying Michael Clay Thompson’s language arts series, but find what suits you and your daughter 😊

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I am trying to figure out what to do once we finish Logic of English Foundations D, (pretty certain it'll be either ELTL, or maybe a mix of FLL/WWE) in the next six months when she finishes. My daughter will just shy of 6.5 years when she finishes, and is pretty intuitive like yours when it comes to English.  Anyway, I am posting to say, if you can afford it I'd definitely do D. We're about halfway through it (I split the chapters in 2). It much more grammar, spelling, and reading intense with increasing challenges in reading. There are pop-up games to make sure phonograms are remembered, but overall D is a lot more yet rewarding work. It's also a good start on preparing yourself if you do go into ELTL or go FLL/WWE route, or even another route (LLATL? MCT? So many options!) 

We also do not plan on going into Essentials. I have looked it over and it seems a little too heavy for this family. Not that I don't think my daughter can handle it -- she can, but she needs more reading, and I'll have a Kindergartener when she starts it, as well as a two year old and newborn, so I'm just not interested. 

Anyway, good luck to you!

Edited due to poor grammar

Edited by JaLeSherman

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Thank you for all the replies! I will look more into foundations D. I really have loved the series because it's so easy to implement and we can do as much of the lesson we need. 

I have several of the plaid phonics books that I bought for my 2nd grader, but I bought several grades because I wasn't sure what would be the best fit for him. I do like it and may use that after, or go through it slowly at the same time. Depending on how busy she wants to be. 😆 

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My son is in first grade, just turned 7 about 3 months ago so is an older 1st grader.  We worked through LOE A and B slowly last year, and did C last semester and just started D.  I went more slowly with him because I did A, B & C in my daughter's kindergarten year and it was too much.   D seems like a big jump in reading, spelling, and concepts.  I would recommend trying level D.  I decided not to do Essentials with my daughter (and don't plan to with my son) because at her young age, it seemed too stark and boring and I didn't like that there is no diagramming, and writing and reading is separate and didn't interest me. 

Just a tip about level D, many lessons require outside readers (like Little Bear) so you need to look at the list and have the readers before you begin.  I think the very first lesson requires an outside reader.  I forgot about it and had to skip those reading assignments until the interlibrary loan for "Polar Opposites" arrives.

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