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mom2bee

Thought Experiment: PreK-Kindergarten as a time for "Electives"

What would you do formal lessons in with a Kindergartener?  

59 members have voted

  1. 1. What would you like a curriculum/program/system for teaching to a PreK-Kindergartner?

    • A Musical Instrument
      3
    • A World Language
      10
    • Drawing (as a gradually developing skill)
      4
    • Art (general)
      10
    • Singing
      4
    • Dance (as a progressively developing skill)
      2
    • Science (as gradually/systematically increasing knowledge)
      8
    • History (as gradually/systematically increasing knowledge)
      2
    • Geography (as gradually/systematically increasing knowledge)
      4
    • Sports/Athletic Skills
      8
    • Drama/Story Telling
      4
    • What Else?
      0


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Thought experiment. If we, as a society, were to do a year or two of "formal lessons" on anything not the 3Rs, which topics, content knowledge or skills would you want to see given the spot light for a 4-6 year old childs pre-Academic education?

 

 

The assumption is that these are developmentally appropriate and geared towards meeting the child where they are at and the lessons  are meant to systematically increase a childs skill/knowledge in those areas.

 

There isn't a punishment or stigma if the child doesn't show marked improvement at the end, but the purpose/goal is to give the child some foundational skills or content knowledge.

 

Similarly, if you were to focus or center the HS education of your 4-6 year olds on something non-Academic, then what would you, in an ideal world, pick? 

 

 

Edited by mom2bee

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Well only voting for one is hard. This is the path we have choosen- too early to give results. But we focus on music, foreign language, art and storytelling/drama. I voted language because the bulk of our energy goes thete.

 

My experience around the world opened my eyes to how beautiful oral storytelling is and such a skill! Many kids learn that well before reading and conects back to our roots in humanity, families haven't had children's books for long in the history of humanity.

 

I think messy art is just a part if childhood and from the parts of the world I have lived and visited it seems to be common. We don't focus on skill as much as process, but I have given different methods and skill lessons to try and copy kind of like copywork with writing.

 

Music is a part of our daily life in our family. We have started piano lessons formally at a young age.

 

And language because we live overseas is needed. But I really do believe these young years build those skills best. And give an ear to hear the differences. How to learn a language will come at a much older age.

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I find this a bit hard to answer because as long as they are done in a developmentally appropriate way they are all valuable. Maybe not history so much? idk? Of course I'd tend to drop any the kids didn't want to go with as well.

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I've been thinking about this a lot lately and lean towards a subject where an early start will continue being an advantage to them over the long term, and something they can get relatively good at even at a young age. A (perhaps) relevant quote I found:

 

"Feldman proposed that children are most likely to be able to compete at an adult level in fields that are highly structured, with a clear set of established rules. Children seem especially drawn to domains like music or chess, which rely on symbolic representation that relate to each other in fixed patterns. Fields that have more open-ended goals, such as writing or scientific research, often require a depth of experience and abstract thinking that make them difficult for children to master."

 

Therefore I think the skills (e.g. musical instrument, language and sports) would be best. I would keep "formal lessons" on content knowledge and creative endeavours for later (though reading about/playing around with them can be encouraged).

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I've been thinking about this a lot lately and lean towards a subject where an early start will continue being an advantage to them over the long term, and something they can get relatively good at even at a young age. A (perhaps) relevant quote I found:

 

"Feldman proposed that children are most likely to be able to compete at an adult level in fields that are highly structured, with a clear set of established rules. Children seem especially drawn to domains like music or chess, which rely on symbolic representation that relate to each other in fixed patterns. Fields that have more open-ended goals, such as writing or scientific research, often require a depth of experience and abstract thinking that make them difficult for children to master."

 

Therefore I think the skills (e.g. musical instrument, language and sports) would be best. I would keep "formal lessons" on content knowledge and creative endeavours for later (though reading about/playing around with them can be encouraged).

 

I generally agree with this and find it interesting that you listed specifically music, language, and sports. Most of the items on the list above can be explored through play in a very relaxed manner at that age. The only formal lessons my pre-ker is doing right now (as it relates to this list) is World Language (Spanish immersion) and Sports (swimming lessons). Music (Suzuki violin) will follow shortly when she turns 5. Kindergarten will be more of the same.

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