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mom2bee

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  1. 1) How often does he write and how much does he write at a time--a sentence? A few sentences? A paragraph? 2) Has there been improvement in his handwriting up til now? 3) Can you post a few samples of his writing? 4) What is the reason that you've never gotten an Eval or Diagnosis for a child you think may have a Learning Difference? 5) What kind of paper is he writing on? 6) What kind of pencils/pen is he writing with?
  2. Please do not hand a calculator to a sloppy student. It's just a machine and Garbage In -> Garbage Out. A calculator just gives her an electronic avenue to generate an incorrect answer. 1st) Are her answers correct? Meaning, did she get the correct answer to the problem that she wrote down even though it doesn't match what you'd expect based on the problem in the book? 2nd) What does a daily math lesson look like for her? 3rd) Does she produce similarly sloppy work in any other subject? First and foremost, what math is she doing and what does a lesson look like?
  3. Looks good to me! What all is in your ANKI decks?
  4. Option 1: Ultimate Phonics has a reading test that you can print for free and administer at home to determine how well your child can read phonetically. You can administer tests for K-4 level reading and the instructions are on the page. At the bottom of the page it tells you which phonetic concepts are being taught. It's super easy to do. Unfortunately, I don't know of anything as easy to do for arithmetic and this test is strictly measuring the skill of decoding. (Decoding fluency is super important in reading! It's probably 75% of the reading puzzle at the K-2 level) Option 2: You can use the website easyCBM and make a Lite account for free. It has a series of printable assessments that you can print for your students and input the scores for online. I haven't played with it extensively yet. It gives you access to Printable versions of all of the student materials for K-8. Reading has different subtests by grade: K-1: Letter Naming K-1: Letter Sounds K-1: Phoneme Segmenting K-3: Word Reading Fluency NOT PHONETICALLY BASED! Perfectly skipable in my opinion 1-8: Passage Reading Fluency 2-8: Multiple Choice Reading Comprehension Mathematics has different subtests by grade Numbers and Operations Geometry Measurement Numbers Operations and Algebra I'm not personally able to endorse the easyCBM tests, but they are there as a free option for you to administer to maybe look for specific skills that your children might be strong vs weak in for their grade ranges. Option 3: Let's Go Learn has online diagnostic assessments that you can purchase and your kids take online. It's $25 per subject and if you more than 1 there is a small discount. You don't have to do anything but pay and have the kids take the tests.
  5. How to Think Like a Coder Without Even Trying is written to be very kid-friendly. It could be a very good precursor to Programming Logic and Design which is definitely meant for an older audience and I do NOT recommend it for a child under 13! Hello Wold! is a coding book that uses Python to teach coding. Very accessible--it was written by a father who was teaching his 11/12 year old son to code. Once you have a plan for what you're focusing on, come and let me know. I have a huge collection of coding books and resources and I might be able to help you find resources.
  6. The best way might be to simply record yourself reading a list of words using Voice Recorder on your PC. Then you can simply scaffold in as much support as your child(ren) will need. So, they might just need to hear the word one time so that they can type it. or you might create a set "script" that you follow for each word. "The word is (pause) ________" "__________" [syllabicate_________] [A sentence that uses the word_________________] [syllabicate_________ again] "__________" So, for example "rascal" The word is (pause) rascal ras-cal Tom Sawyer is always making trouble for his Aunt Polly, he is a well-known rascal. ras-cal rascal You can run through a list of words within a few minutes if you establish a script and have a source for the words themselves. You can sit down and record a weeks worth of spelling words in less than an hour. If you name the files well, then you will be able to refer to them easily later and assign a list to a younger child or to reassign a list of words that you see being missed often.
  7. It's been true in my experience. I always wished that Zig & Co would've published more DI @ Home type stuff. If you want a good DI program, you have to buy a program designed for the school system outside of Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons which is a really wonderfully designed program but it's not enough. Just an FYI: The editions aren't interchangeable for the writing programs. If you have a 1991 writing book, it won't work seamlessly with the 2001 edition and vice versa.
  8. It almost sounds like you can't choose to speed read or not, and it just happens? I was thinking of learning to speed read for my own purposes--I have to read a lot of material in my field and I just want to be able to get through it faster. But would you say that it's detrimental to learn it @Clarita and @Resilient since it seems that you can't "toggle" between speed reading and normal reading at will?
  9. I worked at a school that used Classical Academic Presses Writing and Rhetoric and it was a huge flop for grades 4-6. I hope that the school decides to do something different next year. The students were really bored with the stories and mostly frustrated and most of the teachers hated the program after about 4 months. It did not get better as the year went.
  10. I taught 5th grade this past year for the first time. I worked at a K-8 school so I got to see what the 4th-8th graders writing looked like. I had a couple of students who struggled to write in complete sentences all year long. Most of my students learned to write complete and correct sentences but I had a few whose writing was very sloppy, misspellings were rampant and their thoughts were disorganized. I worked closely with the other 5th grade classroom teachers and checked in with the middle school teacher who was teaching grades 6-8. I'd say that it's definitely a spectrum of abilities.
  11. I'm crossposting this to the Chat Board because I know some of our best and brightest homeschooling momma's don't really frequent the Gen. Ed boards anymore. I am trying to come up with a good sign for my classroom door. It's a 5th grade class. The sign will read something like "STOP. When you enter this room, you must LEARN. But "learn" will stand for Listen Attentively Engage Your Mind or Enunciate Your Words (I have trouble with kids mumbling and muttering and repeating themselves at the same unintelligible volume/pace) Actively Participate Read??? or (Respect Mistakes yours and others) Note-down ??? (I can't think of anything for N. Note taking is an important part of the lesson, but is there something better that I could use?) I'm trying to think of another one for the inside of the room when we leave and are in the halls of the school building... We are about to LEAVE Line Up Egress Quietly and Advance Very Efficiently Hive, I need your help. Any Ideas?
  12. I am trying to come up with a good sign for my classroom door. It's a 5th grade class. The sign will read something like "STOP. When you enter this room, you must LEARN. But "learn" will stand for Listen Attentively Engage Your Mind or Enunciate Your Words (I have trouble with kids mumbling and muttering and repeating themselves at the same unintelligible volume/pace) Actively Participate Read??? or (Respect Mistakes yours and others) Note-down ??? (I can't think of anything for N. Note taking is an important part of the lesson, but is there something better that I could use?) EDIT: NEATLY complete work!!! What do you think of Listen Attentively Enunciate Clearly Actively Participate Read Neatly Complete Work I'm trying to think of another one for the inside of the room when we leave and are in the halls of the school building... We are about to LEAVE Line Up Egress Quietly and Advance Very Efficiently Hive, I need your help. Any Ideas?
  13. Yertle the Turtle and The Sneetches were on my initial list, but I had cut them because the Dr. Suess books take a while to read well and I doubt that we'll have time but I would like to do them at some point any way.
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