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JessBurs

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About JessBurs

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  1. I seem to have this problem more often with my 7 year old, but she sometimes just decides she doesn't want to do something and just straight out refuses to do it. It comes out in a "I caaaaaaaaaaaaan't" whine along with 'flopping'--- melodramatically laying down on the floor or putting her head on the table, etc. Mind you, this is all stuff she can, in fact, do. Most often it happens with math-- stuff we have gone over, stuff she did perfectly fine the day before. It is typically in response to something she finds tedious. For example, she is working on going from feet to inches and back again for length. She knows there are 12 inches in a foot and knows how to do the math, but find these conversions annoying after the 'fun' of doing the centimeters to meters and thus the flopping commences. How do you balance pulling out your hair, just putting away the book (so you don't pull your hair out or lose your temper), but also not 'rewarding' them for just refusing to do the work by letting them just skip that subject today. I find myself keenly aware that just not feeling like doing a subject would certainly not fly in a traditional school setting. Tips/advice/btdt? Thanks!
  2. To make a long story short, my husband was not completely on board initially with homeschooling, he thinks kids need more structure. Joining a co-op where they would have some group learning experiences was our compromise.
  3. So we have belonged to a great coop for the past few years, but for a variety of reasons we might not be meeting next year. If we do not, the only other option in my area would be Classical Conversations. If you do CC is there any room for your own curriculum? I admit that I am very reluctant to join them because it seems so restrictive and I love what we are doing right now in our homeschool. I have a second grader and a kindergartener this year. Unfortunately I have to do a co-op so just not doing one isn't an option. I know that generally CC the program gets mixed reviews on here, so I am hoping not to start a debate but instead learn a little more about how well I might be able to make it work with a homeschool that has already been working well, if that makes sense. Thanks to anyone who can offer some insight.
  4. My 2nd grade DD recently got into the My America books. She also flew through Magic Treehouse books and has gotten into historical fiction after reading the American Girls books (originals as well as the mystery books). The My America books are like the Dear America books but written for slightly younger kids (I think it is targeted 3-5). I loved the Dear America books myself as a kid, but some of the content is just a little too mature for my DD, but when we discovered the My America books she took to them immediately. Mary Pope Osborne actually writes some of them too, which can be a good transition for historical fiction, MTH lovers.
  5. My younger daughter seems to be struggling getting the whole idea of base 10 to really 'click'. She can do basic addition and subtraction of like 6+4 = 10, but the whole idea of: 6+4=10 so 16+4=20 26+4=30 etc. Seems to confuse her. She will see a set of problems like 6+4= 16+4 = and 26+4= and she will quickly right in 6+4=10 but then start counting on her fingers for the other ones. We spent time going over it with base 10 squares and she seemed to get it, but today it came up in a book review and we were right back at square 1, so I am looking to see if anyone has any brainstorms or ideas that can help her really *get* this. She also has the propensity to claim everything is *too hard* if it is not easy. Ie a resistance to struggling a little to get something, so I have been hearing all morning that her math is *too hard*, even though she did this exact same format of problem a few weeks ago and had demonstrated much more confidence with them. Any advice you have with that would also be helpful.... TIA.
  6. Definitely Singapore Math Intensive Practice. I remember my daughter doing ones with much larger numbers in 2B IP-- something like if a papaya + orange + apple+ banana = 354 and then would give you like two other clues where you had to plug in and create similar substitutions to how you solve your example problem (sorry the book is in storage and I don't feel like making up my own 😊) but I remember her doing it the same way. They also did similar problems with weights-- if 3 triangles weighs as much as 2 circles.... etc with substitutions Anyway, since 2B had those types of problems, I imagine the level 1 intensive practices and the 2A intensive practices would also have them but with similar numbers to your example. We didn't discover IP books until 2B, though, so sorry, can't be more precise than that.
  7. For my 2nd/3rd grader (according to age should be 2nd grade, but she had been eager to 'start school' a year early and I let her call that kindergarten, and she knew 1st grade came next, and thus, here we are going into '3rd grade'). Math: Wherever we are in Singapore, my guess is we will be somewhere in 4a at the start of the school year. Have found this year that using the Intensive Practice books instead of regular workbooks work well for her. Science: Real Science Odyssey Chemistry History: ~1600s to ~~1850. Usborne Book of World History as a spine with a ton of supplements. Have been building my list of biographies for her to read (a lot of Who Was....), Classic Starts of some classical literature from the time period (we do a combination of some abridged for children versions and some full versions), nonfiction about events during the time period, and activities for us to do. A field trip to Colonial Williamsburg tentatively in the works (crossing fingers). Language Arts: English Lessons Through Literature C plus Spelling work out C & D (starting C this year, will finish it next and start D). Her independent reading list will comprise of some bios for history, a few classic starts, and a few other quality children's literature (I like the book lists here: https://www.mensaforkids.org/achieve/excellence-in-reading/excellence-in-reading-k-3-list/ and https://www.mensaforkids.org/achieve/excellence-in-reading/excellence-in-reading-4-6-list/ for ideas) Foreign language: Continue to work on heritage language with Skype tutor. Continue to work on French with Rosetta Stone for an intro) Typing: Still looking.... Religion: Haven't put it together yet.
  8. I am starting to casually look through my book/curriculum options for next year and my older DD will be hitting chemistry (3rd grade). My younger DD will be doing the coursework with us (she will be 1st/2nd grade). What have you found to be the best ways to teach chemistry in elementary school? Science was not one of my strongest subjects (though I did fine, I do not feel as confident in my teaching abilities in chemistry as I do in say, history), so I am looking for something pretty self-explanatory. Both DDs also love hands-on activities in all subjects (our homeschool days are filled with projects), but I do not want to spend a fortune creating my own chemistry lab. With all that in mind, do you have any chemistry curriculum/books suggestions for us? I have one IRL friend who suggested Real Science Odyssey Chemistry, which definitely looks intriguing, so if you have any experience with that I would love to hear your impressions of it as well. TIA
  9. So I posted this last night in the Writing Workshop subforum, only to realize that forum is for actual writing samples... so sorry about that. I am new to the forums so unsure if there is some way to get that thread deleted. Anyway, I am hoping someone can help me here: So my daughter is a young second grader. We are using Writing Strands 2 this year and I have been feeling a bit ehh about it so far (of course, my feelings might change as we progress through the year, haha) but I was hoping people could help fill me in WRT some of the writing curriculum they have seen their children thrive with. I keep seeing people discuss different curriculum options and honestly have trouble tracking which ones are middle school vs. elementary school, what all the acronyms stand for, etc. Background: Elsewhere for language arts we are using English Lessons Through Literature L2 and we are really enjoying it so far (my daughter has really liked the reading selections so far). We also use Spelling Workout and she actually says spelling is one of her favorite subjects, so I do not need anything that incorporates grammar/spelling really. My daughter also loves to read and write. She learned to read early and loves fantasy books, adventure, etc. She also has a very active imagination and has notebooks filled with her own stories that she has created (many of them adopting characters from her favorite books and shows and crafting new adventures for them). Anyone have any curriculum that they would highly recommend? I am looking for something now that will nurture her natural writing and storytelling skills, ideally a curriculum that will mature through the ages and teach more academic writing later on: ie persuasive essays, research paper, etc. Thanks a lot!
  10. So my daughter is a young second grader. We are using Writing Strands 2 this year and I have been feeling a bit ehh about it so far (of course, my feelings might change as we progress through the year, haha) but I was hoping people could help fill me in WRT some of the writing curriculum they have seen their children thrive with. I keep seeing people discuss different curriculum options and honestly have trouble tracking which ones are middle school vs. elementary school, what all the acronyms stand for, etc. Background: Elsewhere for language arts we are using English Lessons Through Literature L2 and we are really enjoying it so far (my daughter has really liked the reading selections so far). We also use Spelling Workout and she actually says spelling is one of her favorite subjects, so I do not need anything that incorporates grammar/spelling really. My daughter also loves to read and write. She learned to read early and loves fantasy books, adventure, etc. She also has a very active imagination and has notebooks filled with her own stories that she has created (many of them adopting characters from her favorite books and shows and crafting new adventures for them). Anyone have any curriculum that they would highly recommend? Thanks a lot!
  11. My kids are young so take what I say with a grain of salt... But if I was in your shoes I would just enroll him in a comprehensive online school (ie not a class here or there, but like k-12), at least for this year. It would make him accountable to others and you would not have to be actively involved with the teaching, taking some of the pressure off of you. It would also give him a taste of what it would like to be in school (he would lose a lot of flexibility) and would also make him fend for himself grade-wise. From what I understand, these online schools also have communities of students for him to connect with/work on projects with/etc. Particularly if his goal is OxBridge, make him research the admission requirements and create a plan for himself to meet/exceed them and set him free for this year. If he flounders, at least it is only 8th grade and not high school and you can help him pick up the pieces next year. If he excels, well, then you reevaluate schooling choices for next year.
  12. I am intrigued by what you are saying about Beast Academy, particularly since it looks like by level 3 they can do the work through an online program. She is loving everything having to do with computers right now (of course, what kid isn't) and I try to limit screen time to educational things. She probably would eat it up-- as on the website it looks like math gamification and challenging problems. How would it work as a supplement course? Do you (or anyone else) know how well the topics covered in Singapore 3A align with BA 3A (I am not totally opposed to switching all together, but it is much more expensive than Singapore so I'm just thinking aloud...)
  13. Thank you, everyone for your advice! Today we just cracked up the 2B book (our fall curriculum) and it went much smoother, so I am feeling more hopeful than I did yesterday when I first posted. I also discovered MathPlayground and she has already found games she really likes. I think part of the reason I had not initially just continued with math was that I was afraid of 'pushing' her. I guess to spell it out, I come from a family of public school teachers (parents, aunts, cousins, etc). To be homeschooling I am really breaking the mold here. My daughter is a bit of an accelerated learner-- she is actually only 6 and has kind of "skipped" a grade in our homeschool. At least in the public school I went to there was always a ton of repetition and review, particularly in math. I think I am having trouble balancing knowing when to move on in a subject and when to hang back and spend more time on review. I mean she does all the math with ease (once she understands it, obviously she needed lessons on how to carry/rename, how to multiply, etc), and I guess I just saw the IP book as way of 'going deeper' with subjects, the way you know they do in 'gifted' classrooms in public school. Right now (based on how today went and what she articulated to me in our conversations) she seems, however, as though she would much rather move on and do new material. How do you balance knowing when to circle back and review subjects already covered and when to just move on?
  14. Thanks for the ideas. The reason I like the curriculum is I like the approach to teaching math-- I have seen her make fantastic progress when things 'click', last year understanding base ten and being able to start adding double digit numbers in her head, this year the whole idea of 'carrying/renaming' just clicked-- it has been so great to watch. And the thing is-- when these ideas do 'click' and she gets something new, she gets really excited about it! I also find the curriculum rigorous without being too repetitive, the right amount of practice for topics, etc. I sat down to speak with her and ask her articulate what her problem was with math: I was going to say, "Is it boring, hard, frustrating, etc" but I barely got out "is it boring" before she jumped in and said, "it's boring, very, very boring". I suggested giving up on our summer math book and just starting our fall math book so that we would cover different things and she jumped at the idea. I think for right now we will try that. Since we are starting the fall book a month early, I will have time to intermix it with some math games etc to try and keep it from being too many workbook problems per day. If we start having problems again, I may be back here for curriculum recommendations.
  15. Good afternoon, all. I am hoping someone will have some words of wisdom for me here. My rising second grade daughter professes to 'hate' math and I feel like a horrible teacher because of it, to be honest. She is actually quite good at math. But when she decides she does not want to do something, she will just fidget, whine, and profess to "I don't KNOWWWW" when asked to solve problems, that I know she very well can solve, because she did them fine the day before. The past school year we had some rough days, but over all pretty good. We follow Singapore math and I do like the curriculum. In the spring we did book 2A, so for the summer I got her Intensive Practice 2A. I wanted to keep the summers pretty light, and my plan was to just have her do like 15-20 minutes of work in the book a day. Since we had already done the curriculum, I thought these problems wold just make her think deeper, using skills she already had. It has been horrible getting her to do it, though. The first few days were fine. Then she started with the whining. I would come over to the book and it would be like a basic addition problem that she had done countless times before. There were several days where she did absolutely nothing during her math time. I discussed the problem with her and asked her what she thought might help. We decided that she might work better if I sat right with her. So we did that and it worked for maybe 2 weeks. Today, however, she did the same thing-- fidgeting with her pencil, whining "I don't knowwww" etc etc. In 30 minutes we got like one problem done. She then walked away saying, "I hate math!" and I am sitting here feeling defeated. I like the curriculum and want to keep following it-- I am just looking, I guess, for tips to inspire her to care? Or at least to try? What can you tell me here, homeschool vets?
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