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luuknam

CAP W&R 2017-2018

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DS is loving Fable so far. He wrote his first re-creation fable today. The assignment was to re-write the Lion and the Mouse with the Mouse as the big animal. 

 

"The Mouse and the Snail

 

 

A small mouse lay on the soft green grass, sound asleep. A tiny snail came up to the mouse and accidentally slimed on her tail! The mouse woke up and found that the snail was hiding in its shell. The mouse peeked into the snail’s shell with her eye and said, “Hello. Is anybody home?â€

 

The snail replied, “No.â€

 

The mouse said, “I think I could use your shell as a decoration in my log house. Get out and I want to pick it up.†

 

The snail yelled, “No! The shell is my house, I live here. Just let me go, please. One day, I can do a good deed for you.†

 

The mouse was stunned. “Really? A snail helping a mouse? Haha, that’s funny.†

 

But, she was a nice mouse. She let the snail go. 

 

A couple of days later, the snail heard a squeaking sound of a mouse. He said to himself, “I think I know who that is. It’s Mouse. I wonder what’s wrong with her?â€

 

He could spot Mouse just a little ways up ahead. He started heading towards her. Mouse turned and saw Snail coming her way. 

 

“Snail!†she said. “I’m so excited to see you. I’m hungry and I don’t see any food. Have you seen any?â€

 

The snail replied, “I saw a sunflower patch up ahead. I bet there are some sunflower seeds in them. You can eat those.†

 

And Snail led Mouse to the sunflower patch he talked about. “I thought I would be able to help you someday,†said the snail. “Even though I am very small, I can still help.†

 

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"The Hunter and the Doves"

 

A flock of doves were flying up in the air, searching for food. At once, they all saw some pumpkin seeds lying on the ground. They decided to go down to investigate the pumpkin seeds and maybe eat them. A hunter came out of a tree and he decided to capture the doves. The hunter quickly threw a small net over the doves. They were trapped!

 

One of the doves said, “What should we do, we’re trapped! How can we get out?†

 

The King Dove said “Four of you should take each corner of the net and the other four go in between them. On the count of three, everyone lift up the net!†

 

“It worked!†said one of the doves. “We’re free again!†

 

They raised up the net and threw it back on the hunter! They went back and landed next to the pumpkin seeds. They ate them up and flew off, leaving the hunter trapped. 

 

Just before they left, one of the doves said “Good luck escaping from your own trap!†and he flew away as well.

 

 

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The Crow and the Pitcher - amplification

 

A crow was flying in the sky, sinking lower. He was very thirsty, and thought he was going to die, but then he saw a small pitcher with a little water at the bottom. His neck could not fit into the pitcher, because it wasn’t wide enough. Then, he had an idea. He gathered a few small rocks and put them in the pitcher. Every time each rock hit the bottom, the water came up a little higher than before. Finally, when the crow dropped the final rock he gathered, the water was up high enough for him to drink. He didn’t die after all.

 

 

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DS8 started Fable during the blackout, and I've been itching to get online and share his first story here. We'll probably alternate weeks with grammar for now, as I feel he's on the young side for this program and don't wish to rush him through it. I thought we might spend some time on varied ways for writing dialogue before the next lesson, so it will be interesting to see if that carries over to his fables.

Here's his first story, which he typed himself:

 

The Mouse and the Ant

A mouse was walking through the forest and nearly stepped on a fire ant nest. Then a fire ant guard said, "Spare the nest and one day we will repay you." The mouse said, "Well if you will be able to one day help me then yes." The ant said, "We can."

The next week the mouse was cornered by a snake. But the fire ants came to help and went into the lungs of the snake to kill it. 

The end!

 

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Summary:

Three Young Bulls and a Lion

A lion tried several times to attack three young bulls, but they stayed together and drove him back. One day the bulls quarrelled about who should eat a sweet patch of clover. The hungry lion saw them standing far apart from each other. That made it easy for him to eat them one by one.

 

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Amplification:

Once there was a flock of doves who flew over a hot windy desert and saw some seeds on the ground.  They went to eat the seeds but a hunter in a bush threw a net over them and they got caught. The doves were tense and nervous. 

"Aaargh! We're caught!" wailed a dove.

"You're right! We're caught!" exclaimed another dove.

"Even though we're caught, we should think of something to do," the King Dove sang out. 

"Like what?" demanded another dove.

"Well. We could try biting through the net," replied the King Dove.

"That would never work! The ropes are too tough, and our beaks are too thin," snorted one of the doves.

"Then what if we try digging?" suggested the King Dove. 

"Okay, let's try that. It may not work, since we're not meant for digging. But we'll give it a go," the doves agreed.  They tried digging, but it did not work, no matter how hard they dug.

The King Dove said, "Well that did not work, but maybe we can try squawking as loud as we can to annoy whoever threw this net on us." 

A different dove said, "How would that work?"

The King Dove sat and thought. Then he paced up and down. Finally he said, "That wouldn't work, you're right. But what if we try lifting the net?"

"Yes! Yes!" shouted all of the doves.

They tried lifting the net, all together, and it worked! They flew away into the distance, while the hunter cursed. He felt rather annoyed and muttered, "Curse those little feathery creatures. Now I can't sell their lovely feathers!"

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On April 12, 2018 at 6:34 AM, Pegs said:

Amplification:

Once there was a flock of doves who flew over a hot windy desert and saw some seeds on the ground.  They went to eat the seeds but a hunter in a bush threw a net over them and they got caught. The doves were tense and nervous. 

"Aaargh! We're caught!" wailed a dove.

...

Was the amplification a process taught in W&R? He did a very nice job with it! And I wondered how much of that language came from the story (descriptors, quotes, etc.) and how much came from his head? Did you go through a process or provide supports for that? 

Very nice. :)

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10 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Was the amplification a process taught in W&R? He did a very nice job with it! And I wondered how much of that language came from the story (descriptors, quotes, etc.) and how much came from his head? Did you go through a process or provide supports for that? 

Very nice. :)

The summary given in the book is only five sentences long. No dialogue, no descriptors.

We started out one sentence at a time - I would read just one sentence from the summary given, and DS would embellish it and type it out. It was a bit stilted at first, but then he got on a roll with the dialogue and there was no stopping him! He wanted the doves to exhaust their options before finally arriving at a solution. It doesn't really amplify the moral of the story, but I think he was trying to build tension? He had fun picking dialogue tags. Aside from the one sentence at a time thing, another support I provided was to ask, "How are the doves feeling now? How can you show that in their actions or their words?" And then when it was time to show how the hunter was feeling, he didn't need the same prompt.

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5 minutes ago, Pegs said:

The summary given in the book is only five sentences long. No dialogue, no descriptors.

We started out one sentence at a time - I would read just one sentence from the summary given, and DS would embellish it and type it out. It was a bit stilted at first, but then he got on a roll with the dialogue and there was no stopping him! He wanted the doves to exhaust their options before finally arriving at a solution. It doesn't really amplify the moral of the story, but I think he was trying to build tension? He had fun picking dialogue tags. Aside from the one sentence at a time thing, another support I provided was to ask, "How are the doves feeling now? How can you show that in their actions or their words?" And then when it was time to show how the hunter was feeling, he didn't need the same prompt.

I REALLY like that. That's totally applying the social thinking concepts to writing. Love it.

We're getting ready to begin expressive language therapy, and I'm really concerned about how they might do it. I have my own theories, and what you're describing falls in with it.

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