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Mandylubug

Standardized testing and GA Law...

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So, GA states this in reqards to the requirement for standardized testing :

Students in home study programs shall be subject to an appropriate nationally standardized testing program administered in consultation with a person trained in the administration and interpretation of norm reference tests to evaluate their educational progress at least every three years beginning at the end of the third grade and records of such tests and scores shall be retained but shall not be required to be submitted to public educational authorities;

 

please help me define the underlines. Can I use a CAT test and mail it in for scoring? Is that considered in "consultation with a person trained in the administration and interpretation" of the test?

 

I know I have to give my older boys this test this spring but am confused of the law itself as it is written.

 

Also, what company do y'all recommend to purchase/score these tests?

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Yes, you can give a nationally normed test yourself. By following the directions you are given, you're administering it in consultation with an expert, and by having the publisher or another company score the answers and provide complete results to you, they're handling the interpretation aspect.

 

ITBS and Stanford definitely qualify. I think the older editions of CAT that are available to home schoolers are a bit of a gray area, though I don't think anyone has ever had any problems because of using it. Hewitt's PASS test would not work because it is not nationally normed.

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Yes, you can give a nationally normed test yourself. By following the directions you are given, you're administering it in consultation with an expert, and by having the publisher or another company score the answers and provide complete results to you, they're handling the interpretation aspect.

 

ITBS and Stanford definitely qualify. I think the older editions of CAT that are available to home schoolers are a bit of a gray area, though I don't think anyone has ever had any problems because of using it. Hewitt's PASS test would not work because it is not nationally normed.

 

Hmmm, what makes them a gray area? Just being older? This will be my first year giving/purchasing a standardized test. Wish we weren't required to give the test honestly.

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They results are for your records only. We test annually (ITBS) because I want to see how ds compared to his peers so I look at the results. If that's not important to you then file the results away in the sealed envelop and you're done.

 

You're also supposed to write an annual assessment, though the officials by law cannot ask to see the report or the test results. They are for your use only.

 

There has been talk about certain districts pressing parents to see the file but once the parent makes it known that they do not need to show them and that it's illegal to ask to see them district officials tend to back off.

 

As for proper administration you can apply to certain organizations to become qualified and they will sell the exam to you. We've gone though our local homeschool group and can also go through our CC group.

 

Jim

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They results are for your records only. We test annually (ITBS) because I want to see how ds compared to his peers so I look at the results. If that's not important to you then file the results away in the sealed envelop and you're done.

 

You're also supposed to write an annual assessment, though the officials by law cannot ask to see the report or the test results. They are for your use only.

 

There has been talk about certain districts pressing parents to see the file but once the parent makes it known that they do not need to show them and that it's illegal to ask to see them district officials tend to back off.

 

As for proper administration you can apply to certain organizations to become qualified and they will sell the exam to you. We've gone though our local homeschool group and can also go through our CC group.

 

Jim

 

So, Jim are you stating I can't use a company such as Seton Testing Services to purchase the test from for testing purposes in the state of Georgia?

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Yes, you can give a nationally normed test yourself. By following the directions you are given, you're administering it in consultation with an expert, and by having the publisher or another company score the answers and provide complete results to you, they're handling the interpretation aspect.

 

ITBS and Stanford definitely qualify. I think the older editions of CAT that are available to home schoolers are a bit of a gray area, though I don't think anyone has ever had any problems because of using it. Hewitt's PASS test would not work because it is not nationally normed.

 

:iagree:

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So, Jim are you stating I can't use a company such as Seton Testing Services to purchase the test from for testing purposes in the state of Georgia?

 

 

I'm not familar with their service, but I'm not saying that at all. When we looked into testing for the first time in 3rd grade we found BJU (among others) would sell the test to us if I filled out a form and met the requirements (not that difficult) or we could have someone else administer the test that already qualified and had a source. Either way, the answer sheet is sent back in and the results come directly from the testing company. The cost was about the same so it's six of one, half dozen of the other.

 

I sometimes like to put ds in with his peers (one of the reasons for CC) in the classroom setting so I used the opportunity to do so. I have thought about doing the paperwork so I could help the local group.

 

Hope this answered your question.

 

 

Jim

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I'm not familar with their service, but I'm not saying that at all. When we looked into testing for the first time in 3rd grade we found BJU (among others) would sell the test to us if I filled out a form and met the requirements (not that difficult) or we could have someone else administer the test that already qualified and had a source. Either way, the answer sheet is sent back in and the results come directly from the testing company. The cost was about the same so it's six of one, half dozen of the other.

 

I sometimes like to put ds in with his peers (one of the reasons for CC) in the classroom setting so I used the opportunity to do so. I have thought about doing the paperwork so I could help the local group.

 

Hope this answered your question.

 

 

Jim

 

Thank you Jim! It did answer my question.

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Where did you find this information? GHEA.org says this...

 

Georgia’s Home Study law (GA Code Ann. 20-2-690-©(7), requires that children take a national standardized achievement test every three years, beginning at the end of the third grade. These test scores are NOT to be submitted to public school authorities, but are only to be seen and kept on file for at least 3 years by the parents. There is NO exit exam required of home school high schooled students to graduate.

 

The teaching parent may use any nationally normed standardized test. The testing companies set the rules as to the qualifications of the person administering the test and under what circumstances the test should be given. The home schooling parent is responsible for the cost of the test and having their children tested. The state does not provide this service.

 

Ghea is actually where I found out about the PASS test. The PASS is linked to the Metropolitan Achievement Test to give a national comparison.

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Here is the exact wording from the GA Dept of Ed website:

 

"Students in home study programs shall be subject to an appropriate nationally standardized testing program administered in consultation with a person trained in the administration and interpretation of norm referenced tests. The student must be evaluated at least every three years beginning at the end of the third grade. Records of such tests shall be retained."

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Here is the exact wording from the GA Dept of Ed website:

 

"Students in home study programs shall be subject to an appropriate nationally standardized testing program administered in consultation with a person trained in the administration and interpretation of norm referenced tests. The student must be evaluated at least every three years beginning at the end of the third grade. Records of such tests shall be retained."

 

 

Right, they have to take a recognized test. The test must be given in consultation with a person trained... That training means the person giving the test (that's the consultation) must be trained/approved by the testing company. That's normally just filling out a form for the sellers records. Once that's done you can give your student the test yourself, if you'd like. Or, as staed earlier someone else or some approved group can give the test.

 

The consultation part does not mean that person is going to decifer the results for you. They are merely the test givers.

 

We might be making this harder than it needs to be.

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Here is the exact wording from the GA Dept of Ed website:

 

"Students in home study programs shall be subject to an appropriate nationally standardized testing program administered in consultation with a person trained in the administration and interpretation of norm referenced tests. The student must be evaluated at least every three years beginning at the end of the third grade. Records of such tests shall be retained."

 

Right, they have to take a recognized test. The test must be given in consultation with a person trained... That training means the person giving the test (that's the consultation) must be trained/approved by the testing company. That's normally just filling out a form for the sellers records. Once that's done you can give your student the test yourself, if you'd like. Or, as staed earlier someone else or some approved group can give the test.

 

The consultation part does not mean that person is going to decifer the results for you. They are merely the test givers.

 

We might be making this harder than it needs to be.

 

:iagree: I take this to mean that by registering with the testing company to administer the test (something BJU required) and following the specific directions for administering the test you have worked "in consultation." Further, when you receive your results, they usually include documentation on how to read and interpret the results. Lastly, you don't have to provide the test information or results to anyone. You just need to do it and keep in on file.

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Thanks everyone! After reading on GHEA.org and reading the law; I am comfortable with my options. I will choose one of the recommended testing providers listed on GHEA.org.

 

I do agree I was probably over thinking the entire thing. I personally think GA's laws for homeschooling is to just annoy us. Why do we have to keep attendance forms that we could very well be as dishonest as we wish on and it never be verified by any other source.. but if we don't turn these forms in we could get fined or sent to court due to the truancy laws. Not to mention the declaration of intent yearly and the testing.. I feel I should be rewarded with a refund of my taxes for all this effort ;) especially since they can't request to see any of it!!!

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