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Does anyone use Singapore Math *Intensive Practice*?


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#1 madteaparty

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:08 PM

I find the word problems therein well, intense. What's worse, I am not a naturally mathy person, and I hate that they provide no clue how the problem is to be approached. Are we to use the bar method (completely unnatural to me, but OK)? Construct an equation with the smallest unknown as X? I am using 4A Intensive practice with the 4A Standards curriculum (with which we have no trouble with). We are also making our way through BA and are up to 3C currently. I rather want to skip the darned Intensive Practice but do not wish to be accused of shortcutting math.

 

If you use Intensive Practice, how do you approach it?



#2 Dana

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:26 PM

The bar model approach leads really nicely into using a variable. We did standards through 5B and ds moved on to algebra. We used IP and CWP. I also used iExcel which is now being replaced by process skills http://www.singapore...roach_s/143.htm
These are great for understanding how the bar models work.

We'd do the text, workbook, then IP as needed, iExcel, and CWP. We didn't do all of IP at any point, but I had my son do all of CWP.

We played some with Beast when it came out, but ds was a bit beyond it at the time and didn't want to play with it.

Sounds like you're doing fine.

#3 Crimson Wife

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:40 PM

Many people use the IP books 1-2 semesters behind. Some of the problems in the 4th-6th grade books are VERY challenging, similar to what I remember being on the SAT. So you definitely wouldn't be shortchanging to go through the level 3 IP books along side the 4A/B textbooks.

#4 moominvalley

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 12:05 AM

I understood from a forum on the Singapore site that the Intensive Practice books are meant to be a mix of more practice problems with very challenging problems. It was said that some of the problems are so difficult, it takes days to mull them over. Yikes. My dd has 6a and was a bit confused using it at first. It looks different from the child friendly text and workbooks, sort of impersonal. And, I agree with pp, some problems remind me of SAT questions. When unsure how to help with a problem, I look the answer up and work backward through the problem with her. Good luck!



#5 matrips

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:00 PM

I am a mathy person and I still find them tough! At least to do without algebra. We are using the 4a IP this year instead of the workbook, but still reserving judgment on it. Usually we do text, workbook, and then ip and CWP a bit behind. But it seemed like too much. We will see.

#6 jennynd

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:16 PM

It is certainly challenging. But once you get used to bar, it really gets handy

#7 madteaparty

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:15 PM

It is certainly challenging. But once you get used to bar, it really gets handy

 

I feel like we are almost past the bar method now. He can construct simple equations with the n or x or whatever. So I either go back and reteach the bar (I mangled it the first time around), or live a bit longer with the equations and then go back and try to face 4A with that knowledge.



#8 marlowefamily

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 11:32 PM

For singapore intensive math, it's either a full page or 3 word problems as the math assignment for the day.... what's neat is seeing how hard the kids work to solve them, even when they have no clue...and some days you get lucky- the child states he has no idea how to do the problems, but still manages to solve them all within 30 minutes.  I also have no issue with my kids skipping those problems that are too hard for them.



#9 Candid

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 05:50 AM

The bars actually go beyond just variables. They also help the student see relationships in the problem that are just tough to pick up on with equations so you might give some thought to teaching them.

 

However, some IP problems won't use bars, they use other techniques so don't try to force every word problem into a bar diagram. 



#10 Heigh Ho

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:13 AM

We used it as a Problem of the Day if it was challenging...in other words, the student was expected to try more than onel approach and come back to it if he needed time to think of another approach. If it was an obvious exercise or problem, we skipped it.



#11 Dana

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:48 AM

The bars actually go beyond just variables. They also help the student see relationships in the problem that are just tough to pick up on with equations so you might give some thought to teaching them.

 

However, some IP problems won't use bars, they use other techniques so don't try to force every word problem into a bar diagram. 

 

I remember one problem that I would have solved using a system of equations & it was rather nasty that way. Using a bar model, my son was able to solve it in about one or two steps. I think the bar model is really cool.

 

I also like the iExcel books (now Process Skills) because they discuss multiple approaches for problem solving. I love the strategies Singapore gives.



#12 Momof3littles

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 02:12 PM

I do think mastery of the bar diagram is very helpful. It took me a while to get that down, but once I did, I wondered why I wasn't taught that way. I think it is a nice cross check of sorts even once they move to variables, kwim?

#13 madteaparty

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 03:14 PM

I do think mastery of the bar diagram is very helpful. It took me a while to get that down, but once I did, I wondered why I wasn't taught that way. I think it is a nice cross check of sorts even once they move to variables, kwim

Silly question, but do you recall how you learnt it? I do have to sit and do certain problems myself before assigning to the boy, but I cannot recall where the bath method is initially explained. Many thanks



#14 Candid

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 03:32 PM

Silly question, but do you recall how you learnt it? I do have to sit and do certain problems myself before assigning to the boy, but I cannot recall where the bath method is initially explained. Many thanks

 

If I might, there are two good resources for getting a handle on bar diagrams. 

 

I used the Primay Teacher's book to reteach the models to my oldest:

http://www.singapore...hers_p/hbpm.htm

 

When they were initially introduced he saw no purpose for them since he could do the early examples without them.

 

Later on I got this book which is more thorough than the teacher's guide: 

http://www.singapore...ool_p/bmpst.htm

 

Whatever you do, do not buy anything not written by either the US person (Jenny) OR someone from Singapore: I have also read some books written by American teachers that were horrible. 



#15 madteaparty

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:03 PM

If I might, there are two good resources for getting a handle on bar diagrams. 

 

I used the Primay Teacher's book to reteach the models to my oldest:

http://www.singapore...hers_p/hbpm.htm

 

When they were initially introduced he saw no purpose for them since he could do the early examples without them.

 

Later on I got this book which is more thorough than the teacher's guide: 

http://www.singapore...ool_p/bmpst.htm

 

Whatever you do, do not buy anything not written by either the US person (Jenny) OR someone from Singapore: I have also read some books written by American teachers that were horrible. 

Thank you, I ordered the second.




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