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The Amish Study Time Arithmetic is now at Rainbow Resource!!!!


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#1 Hunter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 02:45 PM

Study Time Arithmetic grades 3-8

One of the reasons, I haven't been using this was because it was expensive to replace the student workbooks, especially the shipping fees. Now that it is available at Rainbow, I need to reconsider this curriculum.

#2 Hunter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:14 PM

Grades 1 and 2 Schoolaid curriculum.

#3 BatmansWife

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:37 PM

Thank you for posting about these. They look really good. I like how they have a story throughout. We are using TT, but I think I might like to add these to use along with it. I'll be ordering TT4 soon, and I think I'd like to get Study Time 4 with the TE. Have you used these before Hunter? If so, do you think the TT is completely necessary? I ask because I almost think dd should start at Study Time 3, because she hasn't even gotten to multiplication yet in TT3 (we could skip anything really easy in 3 before going onto 4). I just wonder if I get Study Time 3 & 4 if I could get by without the TE for 3rd. I hope this makes sense.

#4 lorisuewho

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 04:01 PM

I had Study Time 3 and I don't see that the TE would be essential for it, especially if you are using it for a speed through.

#5 Spy Car

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 04:08 PM

I looked at the so-called 4th Grade samples and it looks like a mix of 1st, 2nd, and Kindergarten level work.

1+1. 2+2?

Telling time to the nearest hour?

In 4th Grade? For real???

Bill

#6 lorisuewho

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 04:18 PM

I looked at the so-called 4th Grade samples and it looks like a mix of 1st, 2nd, and Kindergarten level work.

1+1. 2+2?

Telling time to the nearest hour?

In 4th Grade? For real???

Bill


No, not for real.

These books are very thick. There is a good deal of review at the beginning of the year, and review built in throughout the year. However, I don't think these problems you listed are representative of the program. I'm sorry those are the samples they selected (I didn't check them out myself).

These books are "behind" say Singapore math, but that is because it is a different philosophy of teaching math.

#7 Spy Car

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 04:28 PM

No, not for real.

These books are very thick. There is a good deal of review at the beginning of the year, and review built in throughout the year. However, I don't think these problems you listed are representative of the program. I'm sorry those are the samples they selected (I didn't check them out myself).

These books are "behind" say Singapore math, but that is because it is a different philosophy of teaching math.


Saying they are "behind" is quite an understatement. I looked just now at the 5th Grade Table of Contents, it looks like easy Second Grade topics. Problems like 10-4=?

What is the "philosophy" of teaching math behind these books?

Bill

#8 stripe

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 05:30 PM

But they're up to 3 digit numbers on p 35 of grade 4, so I wonder if the start is a major review?

I think the philosophy is practical and aimed at those whose education lasts until 8th grade. I can't imagine single digit arithmetic could be enough for a society filled with people running businesses and not being technology fans.

Check out this sample
http://samples.miles...ks.com/39-340/#

#9 Susie in MS

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 05:50 PM

Just looking at the cover seems to be a good representation of what is taught. The 3rd grade book has division with remainders, 1/10 of 90, multiplying a 4 digit number by a 1 digit number, tablespoon to teaspoon conversion, subtraction and borrowing of 2 four digit numbers. Looks good to me! Once my dd gets her confidence built up and back on track I want to move her back to traditional math. I like that these are in wkbks. I have been considering them for a long time and am glad that RR now carries them! Thanks for posting Hunter.

#10 Hunter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:56 PM

I have used the complete grade 3 package including the flash cards, and own the 5th grade workbook but not the 5th grade TM. There is a lot of review, but this series is not behind in my opinion. Triple digit addition in 2nd grade is above what many children can handle. How could that possibly be behind?

The Amish do not hold their children back grades or skip grades, and teenagers often teach all grades at once. The curricula are designed to accommodate this situation. There needs to be extensive review at the beginning of each workbook to attempt to bring any late bloomers up to grade level if possible. But the curricula must also challenge the gifted students who will be holding important positions in the community despite only having 8 years of formal schooling presented mostly in a language that is not the language spoken at home.

The workbooks are broken into daily lessons, but the TM contains extensive instructions for adapting the volume of practice. Teachers know what can be skipped in the workbooks and the TM contains extra practice ideas and instructions for extensive flashcard review.

The scope is a bit wider than I would sometimes like for my slowest tutoring students but necessary for normal youngsters who are getting their primary instruction from the workbook and not a lot of formal hands on instruction and practice. So there are pages of practice on clocks, and measuring and counting money, that I personally could do without, but do think should be included in the workbooks anyway.

The workbooks were too expensive for me to be buying for students that were not committed to finish them, and included lots of practice I intended to skip. The workbooks are now in my price range though.

The lessons are designed so students can start lessons without the teacher teaching first. Difficult lessons are pre-taught, and children are taught to work on the review problems if they don't understand the new material at all. The teacher teaches at the same time she helps the students correct their work, later in the day.

You can read quite a bit of Train Up a Child about Amish educational practices, for free at Google.

#11 mytwomonkeys

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 07:08 PM

Check out this sample
http://samples.miles...ks.com/39-340/#



that looks good. it reminds me a lot of CLE.

#12 lorisuewho

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:56 PM

I just wanted to revisit this. I no longer have my Study Time Arithmetic Grade 3, but today I started one of my boys on Spunky 2-2 (second half of second grade) for his summer math. Spunky is by a different publisher but is designed specifically to use before Study Time. . .or maybe it was Study Time was designed to be used after Spunky; I don't remember which way it is. Regardless, there isn't overlap between the programs.

So, I can say with absolute certainty that the 2nd grade book covers multiplication/division (and addition/subtraction facts), addition and subtraction of numbers up to 4 digits with regrouping, time to the minute, roman numerals, reading gauges, adding columns of 3 digit numbers, counting money, adding money, fractions (1/3 of 9, 1/4 of 12, etc) along with shading and grouping fractions, conversions of pounds to ounces, quarts to pints, feet to yards, etc, number patterns, greater than/less than/ equal to, mathematic vocabulary (minuend, subtrahend, etc) and word problems throughout.

I hope that gives an accurate picture of what children are expected to be able to do before even starting Study Time.

We do use MEP as our main curriculum, but I count on the Amish programs to solidfy our computation skills.

#13 Ecclecticmum

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:13 PM

Here I was sitting in my cosy little chair thinking "AMISH? AWWWWW YEAAAH" Then realized it was Grade 3 onwards, so calmed down. UNTIL Hunter had another link for 1-2 grade........thank you, rofl.

Atlas loves workbooks, and loves variety, now I'm staring at them thinking "Want!"

I have 4 areas I am bad in (in that I have twitchy buying fingers) 1. Enyclopedias/Reference 2. Weird/Interesting/Out of the Ordinary Teacher Books 3. Amish Lifestyle & Educational Products 4. Math

And Hunter managed to hit 3 out of those 4 twitches......I'm doooomed.

:svengo:

#14 stripe

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:11 PM

Atlas loves workbooks, and loves variety, now I'm staring at them thinking "Want!"

I have 4 areas I am bad in (in that I have twitchy buying fingers) 1. Enyclopedias/Reference 2. Weird/Interesting/Out of the Ordinary Teacher Books 3. Amish Lifestyle & Educational Products 4. Math

And Hunter managed to hit 3 out of those 4 twitches......I'm doooomed.

:svengo:

Ha, I like all those except I'm not into the Amish....however, I took a look at the Spunky books. I totally missed that they're donkey themed. I am crazy about donkeys! But I don't want any more math programs!

#15 Ecclecticmum

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:11 PM

Ha, I like all those except I'm not into the Amish....however, I took a look at the Spunky books. I totally missed that they're donkey themed. I am crazy about donkeys! But I don't want any more math programs!


I like that the Amish community have a strict no-nonsense, no twaddle (and funnily enough, on that subject, I find CM to actually contain vast amounts of twaddle lol (from my POV anyway)) educational stand, and everything learned is applicable in their lives. They learn to sew from a very young age, since they will usually be making the clothes for their family, their dress sense is awesome (I love the little bonnets, dresses and pinafores/aprons) and they are very much about family & good, proper hard work ethic & morals. All of this is coming from a non-religious viewpoint, most of the above is because of their religion, but just from my point of view its awesome nonetheless.

I can't sew. I can make felt sheet things but my sewing lines are wonky, and make felt 3d sculptures, but anything else in the area of sewing I am sadly lax at (since they make their own clothing from scratch, I was hoping to find some sort of curricula/guide to teach me about hand sewing. I dislike sewing machines and would like to hand-sew costumes & clothing for the kids). Unfortunately, since most of their stuff is taught via the generations in the family, it doesn't seem possible to find a sewing curricula/big guide to take me through how they do that (I have looked at other guides non-amish, but they are either about sewing machines or using patterns you purchase).

#16 stripe

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:24 PM

Don't the Amish use treadle sewing machines?

Anyway, I have seen the book Sewn by Hand by Wasinger, a nice resource on Sew Mama Sew (check out http://sewmamasew.co...d-sewing-month/ ), and there was a Japanese blog I used to read where the lady sewed all sorts of stuff by hand, including clothes, http://mairuru.blogspot.com/ . There are a couple books about making your own patterns for clothes I will be back to give you the names of, that might help. Sew what! Skirts is nice but only (surprise surprise) about skirts, but the directions might help get you started. Improv Sewing by Nicole Blum and Debra Immergut has some ideas for duplicating t-shirts you already like and recycling existing clothes.

Eta: Dorothy Moore's Pattern Drafting and Dressmaking
And Diehl Lewis and May Loh's Patternless Fashions

#17 Ecclecticmum

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 12:17 AM

stripe - treadle is non-electric/manual, yes? If so, I may have to look at that. Electric sewing machines are my nemesis....they are always hungry for my body parts. Plus they are like a rocket, once they start they try to fly off the table. One wouldn't think I was *that* bad at sewing by looking at the high school projects I did for sewing class, but no-one saw the effort that went into doing it (more effort than hand-sewing, and lots of hurts, and LOTS of things I used to cover up the boo-boos). I'm terrible at cutting fabric too *blush* It just would of been nice to have the kind of upbringing where my mama taught me homekeeping and all of the associated parts.

As for Spunky....he is now on his way to me. Told you I was doomed. Along with Climbing to Good English and a bunch of other things (along with some stuff on bookdepository I found like Picture Speller, Drama School, and some Classic Curriculum workbooks for my Ray's) DD said the judgement is out on Rightstart. I know DS will be doing it no matter what (I just had the opinion the other two would want to do it as well) she said she'll try it, but she wants to continue on with her workbooks (and for the sake of peace she said she would learn the math card games no matter what so she can play with her brother) I can't wait to see the look on her face when I tell her I purchased more workbooks for her (poor ducky is sick right now, this is bound to cheer her up and make her squeal)

#18 stripe

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 05:55 AM

stripe - treadle is non-electric/manual, yes? If so, I may have to look at that.

There are non-electric sewing machines powered by pushing a treadle with the foot, which require a cabinet due to the mechanism, and there are also ones that are powered by a hand crank, which take up much less space. There are fans of these in the US among non-Amish and non-anti-electricity folks, most notably in a website called Treadle On, but plenty of others. It is possible to convert some electric machines to hand crank or treadle, too; I've seen people post their pictures and discuss it. I am sorry to hear you've been traumatized and hurt by sewing machines in the past!

And to be clear, I am not *anti* Amish, but I am not particularly interested in them. I am sure there are wonderful qualities one can learn from them, as in many contemplative studies of others, I just was saying I am not really more inclined to buy something because of an Amish connection. However, I am more inclined to buy something if it has a donkey on it. I am trying not to be offensive. This is absolutely true about donkeys.

#19 Hunter

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 06:02 AM

Very few Amish hand-sew clothes. They don't have time. They use treadle machines, and they can be harder to control than an electric one. Yes, I have used one :-) Not an Amish one, but in second form (8th grade) sewing class in Bermuda. Believe me, none of us wanted to be on the treadle machine!

#20 lorisuewho

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 06:31 AM

Stripe, to keep you from wishing to buy a donkey book that you don't need, I should tell you that the Spunky books really do NOT focus on the donkey throughout the book. Really the cover is about it.

My family has a treadle sewing machine. I never want to have to use it. I like electricity, but I suppose if I had to I would do it.

#21 Susie in MS

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 06:43 AM

Lorisuewho,

You said you no longer have the Study Time 3 book, yet you have Spunky 2. I was wondering if you finished ST3 or if you didn't like it for some reason and sold it? When I compare the two Spunky makes my eyes hurt with the format, and I know my dd would have a nervous breakdown with so many problems on the page. ST3 looks much nicer as far as format and white on page go. So I am thinking that if you didn't like it there must be a different reason. Would you mind sharing if you have time? Thanks!

#22 lorisuewho

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:45 AM

There are indeed a lot of problems on each page of Spunky. This has a purpose in a one-room or two-room schoolhouse. It is very clear to the children that they are doing one page a day and also it saves paper to make the books as cheap as possible. My Spunky 2-2 book cost me $5 (not bad for a 1/2 year of math).

We have done CLE math in the past, and that definitely has more white space on each page and the child doesn't need to write as small. Of course, the lessons are quite a few pages each day.

As for StudyTime, I bought the book 3 thinking I was going to use it as review for my oldest son this coming summer. I also bought it just because I could. Because I live near the Amish, I can go to the stores and check things out. I wanted to bring it home to really study it. As it turns out my oldest really didn't need that kind of review this summer, so I sold it. Honestly, sometimes space is more precious to me than owning a lot of curricula. I also know though that I can rebuy anything I need pretty easily. If I had to pay shipping or if I had to mail order things, I might have hung on to it. I also bought the entire TM series of Climbing to Good English just to check it out, and then gave away the upper grades because I truly didn't need them. It wasn't a reflection on the curriculum, it was a reflection on my trying to stay reasonable in how much "stuff" I keep, if that makes sense :o)

If you don't like the amount of white space on Spunky, I don't think you are going to find Study Time much different.

#23 Susie in MS

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:51 AM

Thank you very much! I understand fully about keeping clutter to a minimum . I appreciate your honestly about the white on pages. I am trying to decide where to go once dd is finished with Math Lessons for a Living Education. I will keep in mind what you have said.

#24 Ecclecticmum

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:32 AM

hmm....so much for the treadle idea then.....back to looking at hand sewing.

DD is excited about the coming curricula. She's really a basics girl (as well as a girly-girl, which is also why I finally relented and got I love Hands-on Math! for her to do in her spare time). She likes her projects, loves the idea of Konos, but with the 3r's she very much basic workbooks girl with computer/ipad games for drill. I suppose if she continues upon this idea, its easier to do doing just 2 session of Rightstart with the other two, and letting her do her own work. I also grabbed some Rod & Staff things for Art/Music, as she wants to do that more seriously apart from her siblings (who are currently doing Maryann Kohls works).

I now have 6 tubs of homeschool "stuff" which actually works REALLY well. Before everything was inside my teachers cupboard, making it so I had to schedule every extra and piece in order to get it done. Now I have a box of workbook based stuff (anything in book format) for each of my kids, they can pull out something they want to do, and just do it. One tub is for extras/activites - this is where the science experiment books, kids dictionary and pocket history enclopedia, kohls books, knitting books, and all those pieces go. One tub is my teachers manuals etc, this is what holds my 3r's and stuff that is important to get done regularly. The last box is the books I have to read/re-read. Everything is on a bookshelf in the dining room, lowest being Eve's, then Chaos, Atlas, Activity Books (Atlas can still reach this shelf and get the tub down) and then top shelf being my tub. The teachers closet holds the books to be read tub (I am way behind in my reading, soon this will be down to a more managable level that will be housed in my TM box). I find this keeps everything front and center, and I know whats going on, rather than forgetting what we have.

#25 stripe

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 12:41 PM

Stripe, to keep you from wishing to buy a donkey book that you don't need, I should tell you that the Spunky books really do NOT focus on the donkey throughout the book. Really the cover is about it.

My family has a treadle sewing machine. I never want to have to use it. I like electricity, but I suppose if I had to I would do it.

Ha ha. Thanks for the tip! Maybe what I need is a nice notebook with a donkey on the cover!

My sister in law has a treadle sewing machine. In fact my husband was surprised when I got an electric sewing machine, at how small it is.


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